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ARTS 1690

This is an archive of the Common Course Outlines prior to fall 2011. The current Common Course Outlines can be found at http://www.gpc.edu/programs/Common-Course-Outlines.
Credit Hours 3
Course Title Art History - Prehistoric - Renaissance
Prerequisite(s) None
Corequisite(s) None Specified
Catalog Description
This course is a survey of the visual arts (painting, sculpture, and architecture) from prehistory through the Renaissance.

Expected Educational Results
As a result of completing this course the student should be able to:
1. Gain a knowledge of the art of the Prehistoric age through the Middle Ages.
2. Achieve an understanding of the creative process of the artist as influenced by the artists' needs and concerns.
3. Have an understanding of the cultural, political, religious, and social climates of these centuries in Western Europe and the effects of these climates on the visual arts.
4. Identify and discuss works of art through slide identification, multiple choice questions, essay questions, and definition of terms.
5. Identify and discuss the stylistic elements of artist and art movements during these centuries.
6. Produce a term paper on an artist or art movement from these centuries.

General Education Outcomes
This course studies the art of Prehistoric man, the early civilization, the Greek civilization the Middle Ages through the Renaissance. The course will include the study of the following periods: The Stone Age, Ancient Egypt, the Ancient Near East, the Aegean cultures, Greece (the Geometric, Archaic, Classical & Hellenistic Periods), Etruscan Culture, Rome, Early Christian & Byzantine, Romanesque, Gothic through the 14th-16th century. Through the use of lectures, discussion, slides, films, video tapes, art projects, and field trips to museums and galleries, Arts 1690 explores the cultural, political, religious, and social climates of Western Europe and their effects on art. Art work will be studied on several levels of content including the following:
Structure (the visual elements and their composition)
Subject matter
The works Iconography
The Medium used
The Stylistic Elements (form and content)

The course should provide the student with a knowledge of the major western art movements of the period from 30,000 BC – 14th, 15th and 16th century.

Course Content
This course studies the art of Prehistoric man, the early civilization, the Greek civilization the Middle Ages through the Renaissance. The course will include the study of the following periods: The Stone Age, Ancient Egypt, the Ancient Near East, the Aegean cultures, Greece (the Geometric, Archaic, Classical & Hellenistic Periods), Etruscan Culture, Rome, Early Christian & Byzantine, Romanesque, Gothic through the 14th-16th century. Through the use of lectures, discussion, slides, films, video tapes, art projects, and field trips to museums and galleries, Arts 1690 explores the cultural, political, religious, and social climates of Western Europe and their effects on art. Art work will be studied on several levels of content including the following:
1. Structure (the visual elements and their composition)
2. Subject matter
3. The works Iconography
4. The Medium used
5. The Stylistic Elements (form and content)

The course should provide the student with a knowledge of the major western art movements of the period from 30,000 BC – 14th, 15th and 16th century.

Assessment of Outcome Objectives
A.    Course Grade
The course grade shall be based on the following:
1. In-class tests consisting of slide identification, multiple choice, and essay questions.
2. A term paper or art history related project
3. A final exam

During the first week of the semester each instructor shall give to the class a syllabus containing information as to the weight assigned to each of these areas of testing.

B.    Departmental Assessment

This course will be assessed one term out of every three years. The assessment exam will contain slide identification, multiple choice, and discussion questions. Construction of this exam will be the responsibility of the visual arts faculty under the direction of the Fine Arts Department Chair. In semesters when this assessment is carried out, the assessment exam shall serve as the final exam for the course.
The evaluation of this examination shall be the responsibility of the Fine Arts Department Chair with the results for each student reported to the instructors as soon as possible so that the instructor can weigh the results in the computation of the student's grade for the semester.

C.    Use of Assessment Findings

A thorough item analysis shall be performed on the results of the assessment exam. During the term following the administration of the exam the Department Chair shall meet with the participating faculty members to review the results and consider modifications in the course content, instructional improvement and curriculum change. All recommendations shall be documented and used for strengthening the course.

Last Revised: Aug. 19, 2011
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