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MATH 1001

This is an archive of the Common Course Outlines prior to fall 2011. The current Common Course Outlines can be found at http://www.gpc.edu/programs/Common-Course-Outlines.
Credit Hours 3
Course Title Quantitative Skills And Reasoning
Prerequisite(s) Exit or Exemption from Learning Support Mathematics
Corequisite(s) None Specified
Catalog Description
This course places quantitative skills and reasoning in the context of experiences that students will be likely to encounter. It emphasizes processing information in context from a variety of representations, understanding of both the information and the processing, and understanding which conclusions can be reasonably determined.
NOTE: This course is an alternative in Area A of the Core Curriculum and is not intended to supply sufficient algebraic background for students who intend to take Precalculus or the Calculus sequences for mathematics and science majors.

Expected Educational Results
As a result of completing this course students will be able to:
1. Solve real-world application problems using ratio, proportion, and percent.
2. Use geometric formulas and principles to solve applied problems.
3. Use logic to recognize valid and invalid arguments.
4. Apply fundamental counting principals and fundamental laws of probability to determine the probability of an event.
5. Compute and interpret measures of central tendency and variation.
6. Read and interpret data presented in various forms, including graphs.
7. Solve application problems involving consumer finance.
8. Students will create a scatter plot of data and determine if it is best modeled by a linear, quadratic, or exponential model.
9. Students will create models for data that is exactly linear and use the model to answer input and output questions in the context of applications.
10. Students will use the calculator to create models for data that is nearly linear, and use the model to answer input and output questions in the context of applications.
11. Students will use quadratic and exponential models to answer input and output questions.

General Education Outcomes
I. This course addresses the general education outcome relating to communication by providing additional support as follows:
a. Students improve their communication skills by taking part in general class discussions and in small group activities.
b. Students improve their reading skills by reading and discussing the textbook.
c. Unit tests, examinations, or other assignments provide opportunities for students to practice and improve mathematical writing skills. Mathematics has a specialized vocabulary that students are expected to use correctly.

II. This course addresses the general education outcome of demonstrating effective individual and group problem-solving and critical-thinking skills as follows:
a. Students will apply mathematical principles to solve a variety of application problems involving ratios, proportions, percentages, and probabilities.
b. Students will apply geometric principles to solve applied problems.
c. Students will solve problems involving consumer finance.
d. Students will use linear, quadratic, and exponential models to solve real-world problems.

III. This course addresses the general education outcome of using mathematical concepts to interpret, understand, and communicate quantitative data as follows:
a. Students will read, interpret data, and communicate results presented in various forms, including graphs.
b. Students will compute, interpret measures, and communicate results of analysis of central tendency and dispersion.
c. Students will create scatter plots, determine on an appropriate mathematical model for the data, and communicate results.
d. Students will use linear, quadratic, and exponential models to solve real-world problems and to communicate results.

IV.This course addresses the general education outcome of organizing information through the use of computer software packages as follows:
a. Students will use a graphing calculator or Excel to create scatter plots and decide on an appropriate mathematical model.
b. Students will use a graphing calculator or Excel to perform linear regression.
c. Students will use a graphing calculator or Excel to compute measures of central tendency and dispersion for a set of data.

Course Content
1. Applications of rates, ratios, and percent
2. Graphs and measurement
3. Basic Probability
4. Data Analysis
5.Modeling from Data

ENTRY-LEVEL COMPETENCIES
The student is expected to have completed successfully the equivalent of Algebra II. Essential to success in MATH 1001 is mastery of the following:
1. Solving linear equations and inequalities.
2. Solving quadratic equations.
3. Understanding and using integral exponents.
4. Applying basic geometric concepts including the Pythagorean Theorem, the distance formula, areas and perimeters of rectangles, triangles, and circles.
5. Graphing linear relationships.
6. Computing slope.
7. Writing linear equations given appropriate information.
8. Creating a table of values and using it to graph a function.
9. Carrying out basic arithmetic with polynomials including factoring.

Assessment of Outcome Objectives
I. COURSE GRADE
The course grade will be determined by the individual instructor using a variety of evaluation methods. A portion of the course grade will be determined through the use of frequent assessment using such means as tests, quizzes, projects, or homework as developed by the instructor. Some of these methods will require the student to demonstrate ability in problem solving and critical thinking as evidenced by explaining and interpreting solutions. A portion of the evaluation process will require the student to demonstrate skill in writing both correct prose and correct mathematics. A comprehensive final examination is required. The final examination must count at least one-fifth and no more than one-third of the course grade. The final examination should include items which require the student to demonstrate problem solving and critical thinking.

II. DEPARTMENTAL ASSESSMENT
This course will be assessed on a regular assessment schedule determined by the discipline. An appropriate assessment instrument will be determined by the Math 1001 committee.

III. USE OF ASSESSMENT FINDINGS
The Math 1001 committee, or a special committee appointed by the Academic Group, will analyze the results of the assessment and determine implications for curriculum changes. The committee will prepare a report for the Academic Group summarizing its findings.
EFFECTIVE DATE: Fall 2011

Last Revised: Jul. 15, 2011
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