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Collaborative/Peer Editing

Last Updated: June 30th, 2017

Tool Types: , ,

Overview

Collaborative/Peer editing refers to a group of students who edit a document together. This can be done simultaneously in a face to face environment or in a distance education environment by using collaborative tools such as IM, and Whiteboards. Collaborative Editing can also be accomplished asynchronously by using tools such as Discussion Boards, and E-mail. Collaborative/Peer editing assignments can include projects, papers, presentations and wikis.

Application to All Courses

Communication

  • Allows students to co-author papers and projects.
  • In large enrollment classes collaborative editing can allow students to take “community notes” thus improving quality and consistency of note taking.
  • Streamlines the authoring and revision process; promotes coherence, structure, and stability in the document; increases the quality of the content.
  • Increases communication abilities of students by requiring students to negotiate and collaborate.
  • Allows for users to keep and learn from prior versions of the content.

Classroom Environment

  • Establishes a sense of community among learners participating at a distance.

Examples

View a brief photo slideshow of Microsoft Change Tracking being utilized as a peer editing tool.

Face to Face

  • Create the assignment.
  • Create a set of guidelines for acceptable behavior in the group. For example:
    • Will students be assigned specific jobs?
    • What is an acceptable level of participation and how will students be held accountable for their participation?
  • Create a set of guidelines for assessing student work. For example:
    • Will students be graded on participation?
    • Will students be graded as individuals, as a group, or both?
    • Will the content be evaluated and how?
    • Will the process be evaluated and how?
  • Assign students to a group to begin collaborative/peer editing.

Synchronous Distance Learning

  • Create the assignment.
  • Create a set of guidelines for acceptable behavior in the group. For example:
    • Will students be assigned specific jobs?
    • What is an acceptable level of participation and how will students be held accountable for their participation?
  • Create a set of guidelines for assessing student work. For example:
    • Will students be graded on participation?
    • Will students be graded as individuals, as a group, or both?
    • Will the content be evaluated and how?
    • Will the process be evaluated and how?
  • Assign students to the a group to begin collaborative/peer editing.
  • To facilitate collaborative/peer editing in a synchronous environment the following communication tools may be utilized:

Asynchronous Distance Learning

  • Create the assignment.
  • Create a set of guidelines for acceptable behavior in the group. For example:
    • Will students be assigned specific jobs?
    • What is an acceptable level of participation and how will students be held accountable for their participation?
  • Create a set of guidelines for assessing student work. For example:
    • Will students be graded on participation?
    • Will students be graded as individuals, as a group, or both?
    • Will the content be evaluated and how?
    • Will the process be evaluated and how?
  • Assign students to the a group to begin collaborative/peer editing.
  • To facilitate collaborative/peer editing in a synchronous environment the following communication tools may be utilized:

Additional Resources

For information on tools to help with synchronous Collaborative/Peer Editing activities visit:

For information on tools to help with asynchronous Collaborative/Peer Editing activities visit:

For information on similar tools visit:

Accessibility Statement

Keep accessibility in mind as you develop course content and build assignments and assessments. Many online tools are not fully accessible, so it’s important to think about how you will make the assignment accessible if requested. The Disability Resource Center and the UF Accessibility page will guide you in making appropriate accommodations. You can also find out more about accessibility at our toolbox page on Accessibility in the Online Classroom.

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