Apply for the new MHS Online program for Fall 2017!

Accepting applications now! Starting Fall 2017, students pursuing our MHS One Health degree will have the option of the traditional, on-campus curriculum or our new fully online program. Click here to […]

Events with the EGH Student Council

Our EGH Student Council has a variety of social events, service opportunities, and workshops planned for the Spring 2017 semester. Please join us for the following events in the month […]

Dr. Sabo-Attwood Appointed to Advisory Board nanotechnology journal

Dr. Sabo-Attwood has been recently appointed to the Advisory Board for the journal Environmental Science: Nano.  The first issue was published in February 2014 and was developed to “serve as […]

PhD Student Sarah White published on Atlas of Science

Sarah White, MPH, a fourth year Environmental and Global Health PhD student, recently published a research summary, “Occupational exposure to new influenza virus that infects cows” on the Atlas of […]

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Student Spotlight: Tania Bonny

Tania Bonny comes from Bangladesh where she received her bachelor and master’s degrees in microbiology. She was accepted into the One Health Concentration PhD Program in 2013 with a UF Graduate School Fellowship based on stellar academic performance.  A proud member of “team Lednicky,” she is training to be a virologist, specializing in aerobiology relevant to respiratory virus transmission, and the isolation and identification of mosquito-borne viruses. Her aspiration is to work in the public health sector.

Respiratory viruses can be transmitted through inhalation of airborne virus particles or by direct contact of virus-containing material such as cough droplets with mucus membranes that line the respiratory tract of a susceptible host. It is technically difficult to collect airborne viruses using currently available air samplers, and it is known that airborne viruses can be inactivated by ambient ultraviolet light and other factors. To establish a true risk assessment for airborne viruses, there are two major challenges that include effective collection of the virus suspensions in breathing air and maintaining the viability (“infectivity”) of the viruses. Collection of non-viable viruses, on the other hand, confounds risk assessments: do the viruses pose a risk or not? Tania’s aerobiology research focuses on the development of optimal methods for the collection of airborne viruses while maintaining their viability.

Some of her exciting findings include: collection of virus aerosols from indoor settings using a newly developed virus aerosol sampler (VIVAS), concomitant with the isolation and identification of human respiratory viruses including influenza A and B viruses, respiratory syncytial virus, coronaviruses, adenovirus, parainfluenza viruses and metapneumovirus; isolation and identification of human influenza virus A and coronavirus 229E from environmental surfaces; detection of alphacoronavirus  vRNA in Brazilian free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) from a colony in Florida; isolation and identification of Zika virus, and dengue and other viruses from human plasma samples.

Recent News

EGH Faculty to Co-Lead new Center with CDC grant

Four state universities collaborated recently to gain $10M in funding from the Center for Disease Control for the new Southeast Regional Center of Excellence in Vector-Borne Disease. The center will...

PhD Student Sarah White published on Atlas of Science

Sarah White, MPH, a fourth year Environmental and Global Health PhD student, recently published a research summary, “Occupational exposure to new influenza virus that infects cows” on the Atlas of...

Caronne Rush named PHHP Employee of the year!

Our very own Caronne Rush was named this year’s PHHP Employee of the Year, along with Sharla Alexander in the department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences. Caronne Rush, an […]

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