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Colloquia

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Talks begin at 4:05 pm in the room listed. They usually last about an hour, with a question and answer session. Abstracts are provided by the presenters and can be downloaded as PDF files.

FALL 2017

Date Room Speaker(s) Topic Abstract
Nov. 9 MAT
018
Dr. Archna Bhatia  Adapting computers to humans: How linguistics can help. Abstract
Oct. 12 FLG
280
Dr. Stefanie Wulff What corpus linguistics can contribute to SLA research Abstract
 Sept.  7 FLG 280 Dr. Plato L. Smith II Accessing Data Management Needs and Practices to Enable Research Data Support Services Abstract

SPRING 2017

Date Room Speaker(s) Topic Abstract
 Apr. 13  TBA Dr. Akinlabi Akinbiyi  TBA
Feb. 28 MAT 18 Dr. Martina Martinović, University of Leipzig Deriving variation in syntactic structure  Abstract
Feb. 23 FLG 260 Dr. Kristy Boyer, University of Florida Computational Models of Dialogue for Teaching and Learning  Abstract
Feb. 21 MAT 18 Asia Pietraszko, University of Chicago How many verbs and why? Deriving synthesis and periphrasis from their syntactic context  Abstract
Feb. 16 FLG 285 James Collins, Stanford University Samoan predicate fronting: Constructing word order alternations Abstract
Feb. 9 AND 13 Erik Zyman, University of California, Santa Cruz Raising out of Finite Domains: The View from P’urhepecha  Abstract
 Jan. 12 FLG 260 Dr. Michael Kenstowicz, MIT The accent of surnames in Kyengsang Korean: A study in analogy. Abstract

FALL 2016

Date Room Speaker(s) Topic Abstract
Sept. 8 FLG 245 Dr. Susan Nittrouer, University of Florida Evidence for the separability of levels of linguistic structure from the language development in deaf children 
Abstract
Oct. 6 Little Hall 113 Isa Hendrikx, Université Catholique de Louvain The expression of intensification in the interlanguages of French-speaking CLIL and non-CLIL learners of Dutch and English Abstract
Nov. 3 Little Hall 113 Dr. Edith Kaan, University of Florida  Prediction and Adaptation in Language Processing Abstract
Dec. 1 Little Hall 113 Dr. Debra Titone, McGill University What the eyes reveal about bilingual language processing Studies of cross-language competition, emotion and individual differences Abstract

SPRING 2016

Date Room Speaker(s) Topic Abstract
Jan. 21 Pugh 210 Dr. Kathleen Bardovi-Harlig, Indiana University

‘Disinvitation: You’re not invited to my birthday party’ Abstract
Feb 25th Pugh 210 Dr. Theresa Antes & Amanda Catron TBA Abstract
Mar 17th Pugh 210 Dr. Valdes-Kroff  Abstract
April 7th Pugh 210 Dr. Diana Boxer TBA  Abstract
April 14 FLG 210 UF Linguistics Pechakucha 20×20

FALL 2015

Date Room Speaker(s) Topic Abstract
October 1 Pugh 210 Aaron Broadwell, UF Anthropology Syntax from the bottom up: Elicitation, corpus data, and thick descriptions Abstract
October 8 Pugh 210 Marc Matthews, UF Linguistics TBA Abstract
October 29 Pugh 210 Robert Smith & Deniz Kutlu, UF Linguistics Markedness Theory as the means of accounting for copula deletion and retention in African American English
M-reduplication in Turkish
 Abstract
December 3 Pugh 210 Stephanie Lindemann, Georgia South University TBA  Abstract

SPRING 2015

Date Room Speaker(s) Topic Abstract
January 22 Little 109 Arielle Borovsky
FSU
Real-time activation of world knowledge in language processing and development Abstract
February 6 CSE E222 Andrea Tyler
Georgetown University
Applying cognitive linguistics in the classroom: Teaching the multiple meanings of English phrasal verbs Abstract
February 12 Little 109 Jacomine Nortier
Universiteit Utrecht
Urban Youth Speech Styles and (other?) contact phenomena Abstract
February 19 Little 109 Graduate Professional Development Series
February 26 Little 109 Dan Edmiston University of Florida
March 7-8 Florida Linguistics Yearly Meeting 2
Eckerd College, St. Petersburg, Florida
March 19 Pugh 210  10am – 4pm Student Research Colloquium
March 20 Grinter 404  8:30am – 5:30pm The University of Florida Language Archive Workshop Abstract
April 2 Little 109 Claire Harter
University of Florida
Loo Fey?’: A Linguistic Ethnography of Bargaining in the Dakar Marketplace
April 9 Little 109 Eva Kardos
University of Debrecen
Argument Structural Complexity is Reflected in Event Structural Complexity: Evidence from English and Hungarian
April 16 Little 109 Graduate Professional Development Series



FALL 2014

Date Room Speaker(s) Topic Abstract
September 11 CSE E121 Graduate Professional
Development Series
Grants and Grant Writing 9-11-2014
September 18 CSE E121 Kimberly Geeslin
Indiana University
The acquisition of variable structures in second language Spanish Abstract
October 2 CSE E121 Sarah Howard
University of Florida
The function of silence in police interviews
October 9 CSE E121 Judith Kroll
Pennsylvania State University
 Bilingualism as a tool to investigate language, cognition, and the brain
October 30 CSE E121 Francisco J. Fernández Rubiera
University of Central Florida
Interface conditions and the syntax and pragmatics of enclisis/proclisis in Asturian Abstract
November 6 CSE E121 Diana Boxer
University of Florida
Discourse, politics, and women as global leaders Abstract
December 4 CSE E121 Graduate Professional
Development Series
Abstract

SPRING 2014

Date Room Speaker(s) Topic Abstract
January 16 Pugh 210 Dr. Grazyna Drzazgna Speaking in LGBT tongues in Eastern Europe: Linguistic Borrowings in Lavender Polish Abstract
January 30 Pugh 210 Dr. Fiona McLaughlin Abstract
February 13 Pugh 210 Graduate Professional
Development Series
All about conferences Abstract
February 20 Pugh 210 Dr. Toribio TITLE Abstract
February 27 CSE E222 Graduate Professional
Development Series
Writing your Abstract Abstract
March 20 CSE E222 Yu Lei & Jorge Gonzalez Alonso TITLE Abstract
April 3 CSE E222 Dr. Camilla Vasquez Analyzing the Discourse of Online Reviews Abstract
April 10 CSE E222 Graduate Professional
Development Series
From Paper to Article Abstract
April 17 CSE E222 Todd Hughes TITLE Abstract

FALL 2013

Date Room Speaker(s) Topic Abstract
26 September Pugh 210 Bryan Gelles, Todd Hughes,
Ashima Aggarwal
TITLE Abstract
10 October Pugh 210 Joel Deacon TITLE Abstract
31 October Pugh 210 Brent Henderson More than Words: Towards a Development Approach to Language Revitalization Abstract
14 November Pugh 210 Diana Boxer Senior Confessions: Narratives of Self-Disclosure Abstract
21 November Pugh 210 Paula Golombek Unifying Cognition, Emotion, and Activity and Language Teacher Development Abstract

Spring 2013

Date Room Speaker(s) Topic Abstract
17 January Pugh 210 Mohammad Alanazi
Dong-yi Lin
The Syntactic Function of Gulf Pidgin Arabic
Restrictions on Wh-in-situ in Kavalan and Amis
Alanazi Abstract
Lin Abstract
14 February Dauer 215 John Clifton African Tone in a Tibeto-Burman Language: The Case of Mro Khimi Abstract
28 February Pugh 210 Si Chen Contextual Variations of Tones in Nanjing Chinese Abstract
14 March Pugh 210 D. Gary Miller Are English Blends Predictable? Abstract
18 April Pugh 210 Ningyun Xu A Cognitive-Linguistics Approach to ‘Framing’ Strategies in American Political Discourse Abstract

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