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Past Semesters

Fall 2016

Introduction to Health Disparities

Laura K. Guyer
WST 2322 – Section 045A
MWF 2; FLG 0280; 3 Credits

This introductory course examines the multifaceted issue of health disparities through the lens of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, disability, and special populations. It also addresses the concepts of medically underserved areas/populations, health literacy, cultural competence, readability & linguistic appropriateness and social determinants of health as they relate to health equity.(WST: SS, G&S; GenEd: S, D; HDS Minor: Core.) Syllabus

Introduction to Health Disparities

Laura K. Guyer
WST 2322 – Section 1H73
WEB; 3 Credits

This introductory course examines the multifaceted issue of health disparities through the lens of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, disability, and special populations. It also addresses the concepts of medically underserved areas/populations, health literacy, cultural competence, readability & linguistic appropriateness and social determinants of health as they relate to health equity.(WST: SS, G&S; GenEd: S, D; HDS Minor: Core.) Syllabus

Humanities Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality

Carolyn Kelley
WST 2611 – Section 0167
MWF 4; TUR 2319; 3 Credits

This course uses close readings of cultural representations (in literature, the visual arts, movies, television, the internet, etc…) to understand intersecting categories of identity such as gender, sexuality, class, and race. We will examine how such categories operate in everything from novels to YouTube to the evening news. (WST: HUM; TPS; GenEd: H, D; Gordon Rule 2000) Syllabus

Interdisciplinary Perspectives in Women’s Studies

Connie Shehan
WST 3015 – Section 04E6
T 5-6, R 6; CSE E119; 3 Credits

Drawing on materials and methodologies from a variety of disciplines, this class explores the diverse experiences of women, both in past eras and in the present, in the U.S. and abroad. Required for the Women’s Studies major and minor; fulfills the General Education requirement in diversity. (WST: Core; Gen Ed:  H, SS, D and Gordon Rule 4000) Syllabus

Writing for Women’s Studies: Feminist Voice(s)

Carolyn A. Kelley
ENC3254– Section 03H3
MWF, 7; TUR 1101;  3 Credits

For centuries, women’s voices as artists, writers, and creators have been silenced or suppressed. Although women writers have fought to have their voices heard, the hangover of oppression lingers. What about the students who read their work? Do you ever feel your own voice as a writer has been oppressed or even silenced? What forces keep you from being a confident reader, writer, and thinker? Are any of these forces or pressures the results of your intersectionality – your biological sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, class, or ability?  Do women write differently than men? Also, who gets to decide what “women’s writing” actually is? Along with discussing these questions, students will work on becoming better readers, writers, and thinkers. We will concentrate on building your abilities in these three areas, so that you will leave the class a more confident reader, thinker, and writer. If you can write with skill and confidence, you have a powerful tool in achieving any future goals you’ve set for yourself. (GR6; WST: HUM) Syllabus

Gender, Bodies, and Health

Alyssa N. Zucker
WST 3323 – Section 09BH
M 6-8; FAB 0105; 3 Credits

In this class we will examine how gender is “worn” on the female body. Adopting a feminist interdisciplinary approach, we will explore three major themes: female biology in a social context, bodily practices concerning food and exercise, and disease (i.e., cancer). Throughout, we will examine how these topics are shaped by intersections of gender, race, and class. We will also focus on the role of activism and policy changes in improving health for all people. (SS, G&S; HDS Minor: Tier 1) Syllabus

Women, Leadership, and Diversity in a Global Environment

Anita Anantharam
WST 3371 – Section 1598
WEB; 3 Credits

This course examines key leadership concepts in general, and women in particular. The course is not set up to teach you how to be a leader (or be a better leader), per se, but it will operate with the assumption that if you know how successful women and men have navigated power and authority, applied knowledge and core competencies, and balanced life and work, you will be better able to direct your own academic endeavors and professional development. We will explore leadership theory in general, examine the extent to which leadership, as it is currently researched/theorized is framed for American audiences, and consider whether or not these metrics are useful for understanding leadership in diverse populations and across national borders.(SS) Syllabus

Sexualities Studies

Kathryn Nutter-Pridgen
WST 3603 – Section 0900
T, 4, R4-5; TUR L011; 3 Credits

Sexualities Studies is the interdisciplinary study of sexualities covering diverse theories of sexualities and desire, and how these theories are socially constructed and regulated. Central to the class will be the connections between sexualities and other social locators such as race, ethnicity, gender, social class, age and ability or disability.(WST: SS; TPS: Core; HDS Minor: Tier 2; GenEd: SS) Syllabus

Gender and Transnational Food Politics

Anita Anantharam
WST 3930 – Section 2050
F 4-6; WEIM 1094; 3 Credits

The past few years have been witness to a burgeoning of scholarship and literature on food. Hit-movies like Julie and Julia and best-selling fiction like Eat, Pray, Love, have brought into the American psyche the role and place of food in our lives. This class will focus on Gender and Transnational Food Politics on three continents: in Europe, North America, and South Asia. The course will provide a historical context for contemporary environmental and anti-globalization activism within the European Union, in the European colonial encounters in North Africa and Asia, and in modern-day nations of South and Southeast Asia and North America. This class will require a service learning component. (SS/H, IPG, service learning) Syllabus

Women’s Diversity in U.S. History

Mallory Szymanski
WST 3930 – Section 07C2
MWF 5; TUR 2319; 3 Credits

This course explores the history of women in the United States from 1500 to the present by focusing on such social differences as ethnicity, class, race, age and sexual orientation. (HUM/ SS) Syllabus

Women in Politics

Lynn Leverty
WST 3930 – Section 1H90
MWF 8; AND 0134; 3 Credits

This course provides an analysis of the roles women play in American politics, including political behavior and public policy issues.(SS) Syllabus

Women and Politics in the Middle East

Patricia Woods
WST 3930 – Section 03GE
T 7, R 7-8; TUR 2353; 3 Credits

Examines women and gender in the politics of the modern Middle East from the late 19th century through the 1990s. (SS) Syllabus

Women in French and Francophone Literatures

Brigitte Weltman-Aaron
WST 3930 – Section 11F9
T 4, R 4-5; AND 0034, AND 0101; 3 Credits

This course will analyze short fictional texts, plays, and films by French and Francophone women writers and directors in English translation. We will first examine several feminist approaches to sociopolitical issues revolving around the question of equality and difference as they are addressed by Francophone women. We will study the ways in which Francophone women have defined themselves in different historical and geographical contexts, and their ensuing reflection on violence and oppression, as well as their endorsement of solidarity among women and their multifaceted strategies when advocating and struggling for equal rights. Francophone women writers are also known for their assessment of writing as a militant act in itself, above and beyond other acts of political participation. We will then analyze as well some of the feminist potentialities called for in Francophone women writings.(HUM) Syllabus

The Arab Woman

Sarra Tlili
WST 3930 – Section 05E5
T 7, R 7-8; MAT 0151; 3 Credits

This course investigates gender roles and relations in the Arab world and the ways Arab women and men have historically negotiated social roles and influences. The course will investigate these roles during different historical periods, starting from the pre-Islamic epoch to the modern age, and will focus on gender roles in five specific areas, namely: (1) literature, (2) arts, (3) social and economic life, (4) religion and religious scholarship, and (5) politics. All readings for this course are in English. Audio-visual materials are either in English or in Arabic with English subtitles.(SS; HDS Minor: Tier 3) Syllabus

Independent Study

Faculty
Variable Credits 1-3; Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 4905 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair
For advanced undergraduate students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research. Online Application .

Undergraduate Research in Women’s Studies

Faculty
Variable Credits 1-3
WST 4911 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of Undergraduate Coordinator/Program Chair
For advanced undergraduate students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research

Women Writing about Race

Debra Walker King
WST 4930 – Section 03F4
M 9-11; TUR 1315; 3 Credits

This course surveys women’s writing during the late 20th Century to the present, focusing on gendered Black and White race relations as presented in their literature and in American culture critiques. Students will trace, analyze and discuss how Black and White women talk about each other, coop and reject each other, or, simply, ignore each other in literature as they and their characters negotiate gendered social, political, and personal challenges. (HUM) Syllabus

Internship

Faculty
Variable Credits 1-3; Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 4940 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of undergraduate coordinator

Designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. Click here for more information and an on-line application.

Practicum in Health Disparities

Laura K. Guyer
WST 4941C – Section Departmentally Controlled
M 10-E1; TUR 1101; 3 Credits

WST 4941C is a capstone experience for seniors who have taken WST2322,, Introduction to Health Disparities in Society. Students are matched with preceptors from community agencies working with under-served and disadvantaged populations. Students will learn about the agency and its organizational culture while applying concepts of cultural competence, linguistic appropriateness and health disparities. To register, contact Dr. Laura Guyer. (HDS Minor: Core) Syllabus

Women’s/Gender Honors Thesis

Faculty
3 Credits; WST 4970- Section Department Controlled

Students register for this course when pursuing an Honors Thesis in the WST major.  In accordance with the protocols established by WST and the Honors Program, students design and pursue an independent research project with guidance from an advisor. Guidelines for the Honors Thesis are available here and the Application for the Honors Thesis is here.

Summer 2016

Introduction to Health Disparities in Society

Laura K. Guyer
WST 2322 – Section 0197
(Summer A) MTWRF 2; CSE E220; 3 Credits

This introductory course examines the multifaceted issue of health disparities through the lens of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, disability, and special populations. It also addresses the concepts of medically underserved areas/populations, health literacy, cultural competence, readability & linguistic appropriateness and social determinants of health as they relate to health equity. (WST: SS, G&S; HDS Minor: Core)

Humanities Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality

Carolyn A. Kelley
WST 2611 – Section 4794
(Summer B) MTWRF 4; LIT 0113; 3 Credits

This course uses close readings of cultural representations (in literature, the visual arts, movies, television, the internet, etc) to understand intersecting categories of identity such as gender, sexuality, class, and race. We will examine how such categories operate in everything from novels to YouTube to the evening news.  (WST: HUM; TPS; Gen Ed: H, D)

Social Science Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality

Mallory Szymanski
WST 2612 – Section 4797
(Summer B) MTWRF 5; FLI 0105; 3 Credits

This course considers the social contruction of gender, sexuality, race, class, and other identity categories. Readings focus on families and cultural groups mainly in the U.S. but with attention to other nations. Subjects as intimate as the body and violence and as pervasive as politics and the law are included. We emphasize differences in daily life experiences of health care, education, sports, and religion. Finally, we examine the potential of movements for social change. (WST: SS; TPS; Gen Ed: SS, D)

Women, Leadership, and Diversity in a Global Environment

Anita Anantharam
WST 3371 – Section 02AH
(Summer A) On-Line; 3 Credits

This course examines key leadership concepts in general, and women in particular. The course is not set up to teach you how to be a leader (or be a better leader), per se, but it will operate with the assumption that if you know how successful women and men have navigated power and authority, applied knowledge and core competencies, and balanced life and work, you will be better able to direct your own academic endeavors and professional development. We will explore leadership theory in general, examine the extent to which leadership, as it is currently researched/theorized is framed for American audiences, and consider whether or not these metrics are useful for understanding leadership in diverse populations and across national borders.(SS)

Practicum in Health Disparities

Laura K. Guyer
WST 4941C – Section 0143
(Summer A) MTWRF 1; TUR 1315; 3 Credits

WST 4941C is a capstone experience for seniors who have taken WST 2322, Introduction to Health Disparities in Society. Students are matched with preceptors from community agencies working with under-served and disadvantaged populations. Students will learn about the agency and its organizational culture while applying concepts of cultural competence, linguistic appropriateness and health disparities. To register, contact Dr. Laura Guyer at lkguyer@ufl.edu. (Health Disparities: Core)

Independent Study  (Undergraduate)

Staff
1-3 Credits, Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 4905 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chairFor advanced undergraduate students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research. Online Application .

Internship (Undergraduate)

Staff
1-3 Credits, Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 4940 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chairDesigned for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. Click here for more information and an on-line application.

Spring 2016

NOTE: Letters in parenthesis indicate whether the class fills the Humanities of Social Science distribution requirement in the WST General Concentration and/or whether it counts for the TPS or IPG track in the major. If a course fills a Gen Ed requirement, that is specified separately. To view a syllabus, click on the hyperlinked course and section number.
Majors may count any one 2000-level class towards the WMS major. Only WST2322, 2611, or 2612 count towards the WMS minor; only WST2611 or 2612 count towards the TPS minor.

Introduction to Health Disparities

Laura K. Guyer
WST 2322 – Section 08GD
MWF 2; TUR L005; 3 Credits

This introductory course examines the multifaceted issue of health disparities through the lens of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, disability, and special populations. It also addresses the concepts of medically underserved areas/populations, health literacy, cultural competence, readability & linguistic appropriateness and social determinants of health as they relate to health equity.(WST: SS, G&S; GenEd: S, D Health Disparities: Core.)

Humanities Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality

Mallory Szymanski
WST 2611 – Section 1304
MWF 7; TUR 2319; 3 Credits

This course uses close readings of cultural representations (in literature, the visual arts, movies, television, the internet, etc) to understand intersecting categories of identity such as gender, sexuality, class, and race. We will examine how such categories operate in everything from novels to YouTube to the evening news. (Gen Ed: H, D; Gordon Rule 2; WST: HUM; TPS)

Transnational Feminism

Anita Anantharam
WST 3415 – Section 08H0
T 5-6, R 6; AND 0134; 3 Credits

This course places women and feminism in a transnational perspective, focusing on various theories and movements engendered by women in contemporary national contexts. Development, reproductive politics, women’s health, etc. will be examined. (WST: Core; Gen Ed: S, N)

Writing for Women’s Studies: Feminist Voice(s)

Carolyn A. Kelley
ENC 3254– Section 03FD
MWF, 6; XXXX; 3 Credits

For centuries, women’s voices as artists, writers, and creators have been silenced or suppressed. Although women writers have fought to have their voices heard, the hangover of oppression lingers. What about the students who read their work? Do you ever feel your own voice as a writer has been oppressed or even silenced? What forces keep you from being a confident reader, writer, and thinker? Are any of these forces or pressures the results of your intersectionality – your biological sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, class, or ability? Do women write differently than men? Also, who gets to decide what “women’s writing” actually is? Along with discussing these questions, students will work on becoming better readers, writers, and thinkers. We will concentrate on building your abilities in these three areas, so that you will leave the class a more confident reader, thinker, and writer. If you can write with skill and confidence, you have a powerful tool in achieving any future goals you’ve set for yourself. (GR6; WST: HUM)

Women’s Health and Well-Being

Laura K. Guyer
WST 3930 – Section 03H8
MWF 5; TUR 2319; 3 Credits

This course draws on a range of social science, pre-professional/professional and public health disciplines to examine the health and well-being of women. The Holistic Model of Health will be used to explore the physical, social, emotional and spiritual aspects of women’s health. Health issues across the lifespan will be examined: health disparities, clinical trials, sexual identity, women of color, chronic disease, mental health, tobacco use, substance abuse, domestic violence and care giving. (WST: SS)

Women in French Literature and Cinema

Carol J. Murphy
WST 3930 – Section 1D46
T 5-6, R 6; TUR 2353, TUR 2354; 3 Credits

Introduction to the rich heritage of feminist traditions in France and Francophone countries through an exploration of women writers and thinkers (filmmakers, theorists), primarily of the 19th and 20th centuries. Selected topics include L’écriture féminine (Writing the Feminine), autobiographical writing by French and Francophone women, women in French cinema and representations of women in French film and literature. Students will read, discuss and analyze a broad spectrum of primary and secondary sources from a feminist viewpoint.(WST; HUM)

Women and Religion

Whitney Sanford
WST 3930 – Section 1D46
M 8-9, W 9; AND 0134, 3 Credits

This course is meant as an overview and introduction to issues related to women and religion. The course will be divided into three sections: first, students will gain some background information about gender distinctions in world religions and also read primary texts from several world religions. Next, we will turn to historical and ethnographic descriptions of women in religious communities and discuss how they are interpreting their roles through religious practice. Finally, we will turn to feminist critique of religion and examine how feminist theologians are attempting to challenge traditional religions, through either challenging them from within, or rejecting them and building new religious visions. While this course cannot hope to cover everything contained under the title “women and religion” it will provide an introduction to some of the debates and controversies in the fields of religious studies and women’s studies, along with some historical background on women’s religious experiences. (WST: HUM)

Women in Hollywood, 1950 – Current

Carolyn Kelley
WST 3930 – Section 1591
MWF 4; LIT 0113, 3 Credits

This course examines the ways Hollywood cinema represents women by focusing on close readings of filmic texts (both discursive and formal elements) and blending these close readings with feminist theory/ feminist film theory in relation to the feminism versus post-feminism debate, “the chick flick,” the gaze, and the new Hollywood “Fempire.” We will also discuss types of women characters found in Hollywood films, such as “the working girl,” “the good wife/mother,” and” femme fatale.” Throughout the course, we will study how race, gender, sexual orientation, social class, and historical context intersect with Hollywood cinema. Films will include Alien (Ridley Scott, 1979), The Blue Gardenia (Fritz Lang, 1953), Body Heat (Lawrence Kasdan 1981), Bridesmaids (Paul Feig, 2011), The Children’s Hour (William Wyler 1961), Go Fish (Rose Troche 1994), Legally Blonde (Robert Luketic, 2001), Real Women Have Curves (Patricia Cardoso 2002), and Working Girl (Mike Nichols, 1988). Students who have not taken a prior film class will need to review an introductory film style guide/textbook before or during the semester. (WST: HUM)

Women in 19th Century US History

James Gallman
WST 3930 – Section 1732
MWF 5; PUGH 120; 3 Credits

The nineteenth century was a time of flux for many American Women. Despite cultural rules limiting the public behavior of women, various individuals and groups challenged these dominant gender norms. This course will explore a variety of ways in which women entered the public arena dueing this period. Readings and discussions will examine topics ranging from activists and reformers, to novelists and orators, from slave owners and the enslaved, to seamstresses and prostitutes. (WST; HUM/SS)

African Women Writers

Rose Sau Lugano
WST 4930 – Section 079B
T 7-8, TUR 2305; R 8 TUR 2306; 3 Credits

In this class we will explore African women writers and critics, looking at their theoretical priorities and cultural positions. This course is designed to provide students with both a specific and a general view of the status, achievements and experiences of African women in fiction. Using different genres (novels and plays) we will endeavor to understand how women’s literary expression has been shaped by history, culture, and their experiences, as well as see how they are addressing issues of gender in their respective societies. Our discussions will focus on issues of identity, oppression, resistance, exile, language, translation and colonialism, using as points of entry a diverse set of texts. The framework for classroom discussion will revolve around two central issues: 1) The way in which women authors represent gender as a crucial variable for social stratification. 2) The use of writing itself as a tool for social transformation and critique.(WST: HUM)

Independent Study (Undergraduate)

STAFF
WST 4905 – Section Departmentally Controlled; Credits: 1-3

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair

For advanced undergraduate students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research. Online application.

Women and Therapy

Trysh Travis
WST 4930 – Section 09A3
T 4, R 4-5; MAT 0016; 3 Credits

Contemporary “psychology” had its origins in the 19th century treatment of mad women. Today, men constitute the bulk of in-patient mental health clients, while the vast majority of out-patient services go to women, who are diagnosed with depression, anxiety, and related somatic complaints at approximately three times the rate of men. Unsurprisingly, women are the largest consumes of “self-help” culture as well. And at the same time, the American Psychological Association estimates that 75% of postgraduate students in psychology and related fields today are women. This class examines the relationship between women and therapy as it has evolved since the 19th century, looking at women both as patients and as practitioners. While attending to the bio- and neurological dimensions of mental illness, it is grounded in a social constructivist approach, and draws on history, literature, and feminist and critical theory as well as clinical writings. Attention will be paid to traditionally “female complaints,” including hysteria (and its contemporary analogue, borderline personality disorder), eating disorders, and depression as well as to the innovations of feminist therapy and multicultural counseling. Students will do weekly short papers and a substantial final project. Although the class will not dwell at length on the psychoanalytic theories of Sigmund Freud, the class presumes some knowledge of Freud, if for no other reason than to understand both his continued utility and the feminist critique of him. Students should purchase and read Freud for Beginners (Appignanesi and Zarate; available through amazon.com) in preparation for the first class meeting. (WST: SS/HUM)

Discrimination and Health

Alyssa Zucker
WST 4930 – Section 1D49
W 7-9; FLG 0285, 3 Credits

In this class we will study discrimination and health from a variety of disciplinary perspectives (e.g., psychology, women’s studies, public health). The course is organized into three broad sections. The first explores mechanisms by which discrimination “gets under the skin” to affect health behaviors and health outcomes. The second focuses on discrimination within healthcare settings. The third emphasizes routes to eliminating discrimination and improving health at individual, group, and legislative levels. Within each of these sections we will focus on a variety of types of discrimination, including those based on race, sex, social class, and sexual orientation/gender identity. Because these categories do not influence people in isolation, we will examine the intersection of identities whenever possible in our analysis. We will read original research reports (not a textbook) and all students will be required to participate actively in class discussions. (WST: SS/HUM;G&S )

Sociolinguistics of Gender and Language

Diana Boxer
WST 4930 – Section 1E78
T 8-9; MAT 0009, R 8; MAT 0011; 3 Credits

Have you ever wondered why people who say they are not sexist (or racist) nevertheless act in ways that are sexist (& racist)? Have you ever wondered why you feel excluded even when material is said to be inclusive? Have you ever wondered what it means for a language to be sexist? Have you ever wondered what language structure has to do with sexism (& racism)? This course will give you a guidebook around the sinkholes of English that sabotage even people of good will who ideologically, and ethically, would choose to be non_sexist (& non_racist). We will look, briefly, at some of the other ways in which other human beings have organized their interrelationships through grammars that incorporate other organizational principles. (WST: SS)

Queer Life/Writing

Kim Emery
WST 4930 – Section 1F51
T, 8-9, R 9; TUR 1315, TUR 2322, 3 Credits

This course explores autobiography, memoir, and autobiographical fiction produced by LGBTQ writers in the US, post-Stonewall. Because queer self-fashioning has, historically, most often occurred within hostile and/or uncomprehending environments, we will seek to contextualize our readings not only in relation to the larger literary tradition of life writing, but also in connection to the theoretical and historical frameworks of specifically queer self-invention and representation.(WST: HUM; TPS)

Women and Islam

Zoharah Simmons
WST 4930- 4352
T 7, R7-8; AND 0021; 3 Credits

This course brings a feminist insider perspective to the volatile subject of “Women and Islam.” Most non-Muslims see Islam as the root cause of the oppression of women in the Muslim world. However, a growing number of Muslim women scholars and activists have begun to challenge the notions that Islam is synonymous with the oppression of women. In this course, we will review the history of the religion and women’s place in it, bringing to the foreground the significant role women played in Islam’s early history. We will also examine the situation of contemporary Muslim women from both the perspectives of Islamic Nationalists and Islamists. Both groups see women as a crucial component for the preservation of Islamic societies. (WST: HUM; IPG)

Early LGBT Literature

Jodi Schorb
WST 4930- 173B
T 7, R7-8; TUR 2333; 3 Credits

This upper-division English literature course surveys and analyzes early literature of same-sex desire (before the word “homosexuality” was coined in 1869), from Greek and Roman myth, to Renaissance poetry and neoclassical satire, to a sustained unit on 19th-century American literature (fiction, poetry, diaries and private correspondence). Two literary-analysis essays (5-8 pages); group work including creative writing and oral presentations, and regular participation required. (WST: HUM; TPS)

Capstone Seminar in Women’s Studies

Tace Hedrick
WST4935 – Section 4900
T 8-9, R 8; UST 108; 3 Credits

This course (required for all majors) is the culmination of the Women’s Studies major. It explores some examples of past and present scholarship to reaffirm the interdisciplinary nature of the field and to highlight the relationships among feminist theory, intellectual practice, and social change. The bulk of the semester is devoted to a full-length independent project on a topic of student’s own choosing. (WST: Core for all tracks in major)

Internship (Undergraduate)

STAFF
WST 4940 – Section Departmentally Controlled; Credits 1-3

Prerequisite: Approval of the undergraduate coordinator. This course is designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. Click here for more information and an on-line application.

Practicum in Health Disparities

Laura K. Guyer
WST4941C- Section Departmentally Controlled
M 10-E1; TUR 2328; 3 Credits

WST 4941C is a capstone experience for seniors who have taken WST 2322, Introduction to Health Disparities in Society. Students are matched with preceptors from community agencies working with under-served and disadvantaged populations. Students will learn about the agency and its organizational culture while applying concepts of cultural competence, linguistic appropriateness and health disparities. To register, contact Dr. Laura Guyer at lkguyer@ufl.edu. (Health Disparities: Core)

Women’s/Gender Honors Thesis

STAFF
WST 4970 – Section Departmentally Controlled; 3 Credits

Students register for this course when pursuing an Honors Thesis in the WST major. In accordance with the protocols established by WST and the Honors Program, students design and pursue an independent research project with guidance from an advisor. Guidelines for the thesis is available here; the application, available here, must be signed by the student, the advisor, and the other committee member(s) and submitted to the Undergraduate Coordinator by the last day of drop/add.

Fall 2015

NOTE: Letters in parenthesis indicate how the class fills a distribution requirement in the WST General Concentration and/or whether it counts for the TPS or IPG track in the major. If a course fills a GenEd requirement, that is specified separately. Click on the hyperlinks below for a course syllabus.
Majors may count any one 2000-level class towards the WMS major. Only WST2322, 2611, or 2612 count towards the WMS minor; only WST2611 or 2612 count towards the TPS minor.

Introduction to Health Disparities

Laura K. Guyer
WST 2322 – Section 045A
MWF 2; MAT 0018; 3 Credits

This introductory course examines the multifaceted issue of health disparities through the lens of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, disability, and special populations. It also addresses the concepts of medically underserved areas/populations, health literacy, cultural competence, readability & linguistic appropriateness and social determinants of health as they relate to health equity.(WST: SS, G&S; GenEd: S, D; HDS Minor: Core.)

Humanities Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality

Carolyn Kelley
WST 2611 – Section 0167
MWF 4; NZH 0112; 3 Credits

This course uses close readings of cultural representations (in literature, the visual arts, movies, television, the internet, etc…) to understand intersecting categories of identity such as gender, sexuality, class, and race. We will examine how such categories operate in everything from novels to YouTube to the evening news. (WST: HUM; TPS; GenEd: H, D; Gordon Rule 2000)

Interdisciplinary Perspectives in Women’s Studies

Patricia A. Travis
WST 3015 – Section 04E6
T5-6, R 6; MAT 0016; 3 Credits

Drawing on materials and methodologies from a variety of disciplines, this class explores the diverse experiences of women, both in past eras and in the present, in the U.S. and abroad. Required for the Women’s Studies major and minor; fulfills the General Education requirement in diversity. (WST: Core; Gen Ed: H, SS, D and Gordon Rule 4000)

Sexualities Studies

Lorna N. Bracewell
WST 3603 – Section 0900
MWF 8; FAB 0105; 3 Credits

Sexualities Studies is the interdisciplinary study of sexualities covering diverse theories of sexualities and desire, and how these theories are socially constructed and regulated. Central to the class will be the connections between sexualities and other social locators such as race, ethnicity, gender, social class, age and ability or disability.(WST: SS; TPS: Core; GenEd: SS)

Gender, Bodies, and Health

Alyssa N. Zucker
WST 3930 – Section 2233
M 6-8; MAT 0016; 3 Credits

In this class we will examine how gender is “worn” on the female body. Adopting a feminist interdisciplinary approach, we will explore three major themes: female biology in a social context, bodily practices concerning food and exercise, and disease (i.e., cancer). Throughout, we will examine how these topics are shaped by intersections of gender, race, and class. We will also focus on the role of activism and policy changes in improving health for all people. (SS, G&S; HDS Minor: Tier 1)

Women’s Diversity in U.S. History

Mallory Szymanski
WST 3930 – Section 07C2
MWF 7; TUR 2319; 3 Credits

This course explores the history of women in the United States from 1500 to the present by focusing on such social differences as ethnicity, class, race, age and sexual orientation. (HUM/ SS)

History of Black Women’s Health

Evan Hart
WST 3930 – Section 15ED
MWF 6, MCCA 2196; 3 Credits

This course explores black women’s health issues in American history from the eighteenth through the twentieth centuries. In particular we will examine the personal experiences and medical views of black women’s life cycle events, the roles of black women as patients, providers and activists, and the effects of race and gender on perceptions of health, wellness and illness. (HUM/SS/G&S; HDS Minor: Tier 1)

Women in Politics

Lynn Leverty
WST 3930 – Section 1H90
T 5-6, R 6; AND 0134; 3 Credits

This course provides an analysis of the roles women play in American politics, including political behavior and public policy issues.(SS)

Queer Nations

Jack Hutchens
WST 3930 – Section 11F9
T 5-6, R 6; TUR 2342, TUR 2349; 3 Credits

There has been much theoretical work in redefining identity as a construction or performance, and consequently questioning its perceived stability. Instead of accepting the notion that identity is an always-already bounded structure, scholars have pointed out its actual permeability. Notions of gender and national identity are just two areas of this kind of investigation. This course will critically investigate the intersection between gender and nation in various works of fiction from nations around Central and Eastern Europe such as Poland, The Czech Republic, Russia, Hungary, and Germany. We will ask how these texts work against nationalist and hetero-normative regimes of exclusivity, and whether their subversiveness has any effect in the political and practical realm. (HUM/SS)

Independent Study

Faculty
Variable Credits 1-3; Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 4905 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair

For advanced undergraduate students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research. Online Application.

Women and Leadership

Anita Anantharam
WST 4930 – Section 03F4
WEB; 3 Credits

This course examines key leadership concepts in general, and women in particular. The course is not set up to teach you how to be a leader (or be a better leader), per se, but it will operate with the assumption that if you know how successful women and men have navigated power and authority, applied knowledge and core competencies, and balanced life and work, you will be better able to direct your own academic endeavors and professional development. We will explore leadership theory in general, examine the extent to which leadership, as it is currently researched/theorized is framed for American audiences, and consider whether or not these metrics are useful for understanding leadership in diverse populations and across national borders.(SS)

Hebrew Goddess

Patricia Woods
WST 4930 – Section 055A
T 5-6, R 6; TUR 2318; 3 Credits

This course investigates the Goddess in Ancient Israelite religion as it moves from inclusion of both feminine and masculine aspects of the Divine to a strict form of monotheism associated with only a masculine God. There is less debate about the role of the Goddess or the feminine aspect of the Divine in other religions of the Ancient world. However, in part because of the political climate today, the topic of the Hebrew Goddess remains controversial. We will analyze some of these controversies as well as the evidence for the feminine aspect of the Divine in Ancient Israel. (HUM)

Gender and Development in Africa

Renata Serra
WST 4930 – Section 1H34
T 7, R 7-8; TUR 2333; 3 Credits

The course enables students to learn about gender issues across a variety of geographical contexts and sectors and to question existing stereotypes about gender roles and relationshipsin developing countries. We will reflect on the complexity of the issues at stake, involving different and overlapping aspects of subordination and empowerment, global constraints andlocal resistance. Moreover, we will examine the “discovery” of gender in the development policy arena, discussing various and contrasting perspectives, from mainstream development positions to feminist critiques; as well as efforts and challenges of mainstreaming gender into policy making (by governments, NGOs and donor agencies). (SS; IPG)

Black Women, Writing, and Race

Randi Gill-Sadler
WST 4930 – Section 22D8
MWF 7; AND 101; 3 Credits

In 1982, Gloria T. Hull, Patricia Bell-Scott, and Barbara Smith compiled a collection of essays by Black women on topics ranging from political theory to literary analysis and entitled All the Women are White, All the Blacks Are Men, But Some of Us are Brave. Taking its name from that groundbreaking collection, this course examines Black women’s literature and theory about race and processes of racialization throughout the Americas: North America, South America, and the Caribbean. The course seeks to highlight the ways that Black women’s literature has challenged dominant concepts of blackness that are firmly rooted in masculinity or a United States geopolitical context. In addition to surveying literature from writers such as Mary Prince, Zora Neale Hurston, Gayl Jones, and Edwidge Danticat, students will also engage with theories of Black women’s writing by scholars such as Carole Boyce Davies and Madhu Dubey. Students will be encouraged to consider multiple “blacknesses,” how gender shapes expressions of blackness, and why some literary expressions of blackness rise to prominence while others do not. Students will be required participate thoughtfully and critically in class discussions and to complete weekly readings, 6–8 weekly reading responses, a panel presentation, and a final paper. (HUM)

Queer Theory

Kim L. Emery
WST 4930 – Section 22D9
T 7, R 7-8; TUR 2346, TUR 1315; 3 Credits

This course is an overview of major concerns, methodologies and texts in queer theory, illuminating the theoretical insights, assumptions and implications of various constructions of gender, sex and sexuality. (HUM; TPS: Core)

Human Sexuality

Laurie Mintz
WST 4930 – Section 222C
W 9-11; CLB C130; 3 Credits

This class will cover the topic of human sexuality from a psychological perspective. We will examine current research on sexuality. A wide range of topics will be covered including but not limited to: 1) Sexual responses; 2) Sexual practices; and 3) Sexual dysfunctions and the treatments for them. There will be a focus on understanding common misconceptions regarding sexuality and current controversies in the field. (SS; TPS)

Women and French Cinema

Sylvie Blum
WST 4930 – Section 225C
M 7-8, W 7, T 9-11; TUR 2322, ROL 0115, 4 Credits

In this course we will explore representative works by some of the most powerful and influential French and Francophone women writers of the 20th and 21st centuries as they reflect on the role of family dynamics in the shaping of their identities. Camaraderie, conflict, cultural dislocation, and oftentimes turbulent explorations of self through a family other—sibling or parent—mark these texts as meditations on familial relationships.(HUM;IPG)

Internship

Faculty
Variable Credits 1-3; Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 4940 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of undergraduate coordinator

Designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues.

Click here for more information and an on-line application.

Practicum in Health Disparities

Laura K. Guyer
WST 4941C – Section Departmentally Controlled
M 10-E1; TUR 1101; 3 Credits

WST 4941C is a capstone experience for seniors who have taken WST2322,, Introduction to Health Disparities in Society. Students are matched with preceptors from community agencies working with under-served and disadvantaged populations. Students will learn about the agency and its organizational culture while applying concepts of cultural competence, linguistic appropriateness and health disparities. To register, contact Dr. Laura Guyer. (HDS Minor: Core)

Women’s/Gender Honors Thesis

Faculty
3 Credits; WST 4970- Section Department Controlled

Students register for this course when pursuing an Honors Thesis in the WST major. In accordance with the protocols established by WST and the Honors Program, students design and pursue an independent research project with guidance from an advisor. Guidelines for the Honors Thesis are available here and the Application for the Honors Thesis is here.

Summer 2015

NOTE: Letters in parenthesis indicate how the class fills a distribution requirement in the WST General Concentration and/or whether it counts for the TPS or IPG track in the major. If a course fills a GenEd requirement, that is specified separately. Click on the hyperlinks below for a course syllabus.
Majors may count any one 2000-level class towards the WMS major. Only WST2322, 2611, or 2612 count towards the WMS minor; only WST2611 or 2612 count towards the TPS minor.

Introduction to Health Disparities in Society

Laura K. Guyer
WST 2322 – Section 0197
(Summer A) MTWRF 2; TUR2319; 3 Credits

This introductory course examines the multifaceted issue of health disparities through the lens of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, disability, and special populations. It also addresses the concepts of medically underserved areas/populations, health literacy, cultural competence, readability & linguistic appropriateness and social determinants of health as they relate to health equity. (WST: SS, G&S; HDS Minor: Core)

Humanities Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality

Carolyn A. Kelley
WST 2611 – Section 4794
(Summer B) MTWRF 4; TUR 2319; 3 Credits

This course uses close readings of cultural representations (in literature, the visual arts, movies, television, the internet, etc) to understand intersecting categories of identity such as gender, sexuality, class, and race. We will examine how such categories operate in everything from novels to YouTube to the evening news. (WST: HUM; TPS; Gen Ed: H, D)

Social Science Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality

Mallory Szymanski
WST 2612 – Section 4797
(Summer B) MTWRF 5; TUR 2319; 3 Credits

This course considers the social contruction of gender, sexuality, race, class, and other identity categories. Readings focus on families and cultural groups mainly in the U.S. but with attention to other nations. Subjects as intimate as the body and violence and as pervasive as politics and the law are included. We emphasize differences in daily life experiences of health care, education, sports, and religion. Finally, we examine the potential of movements for social change. (WST: SS; TPS; Gen Ed: SS, D)

Practicum in Health Disparities

Laura K. Guyer
WST 4941C – Section 0143
(Summer A) MTWRF 4; TUR 1105; 3 Credits

WST 4941C is a capstone experience for seniors who have taken WST 2322, Introduction to Health Disparities in Society. Students are matched with preceptors from community agencies working with under-served and disadvantaged populations. Students will learn about the agency and its organizational culture while applying concepts of cultural competence, linguistic appropriateness and health disparities. To register, contact Dr. Laura Guyer at lkguyer@ufl.edu. (Health Disparities: Core)

Independent Study (Undergraduate)

Staff
1-3 Credits, Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 4905 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair For advanced undergraduate students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research.Online application.

Internship (Undergraduate)

Staff
1-3 Credits, Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 4940 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair Designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. Click here for more information and an on-line application.

Spring 2015

NOTE: Letters in parenthesis indicate whether the class fills the Humanities of Social Science distribution requirement in the WST General Concentration and/or whether it counts for the TPS or IPG track in the major. If a course fills a Gen Ed requirement, that is specified separately. To view a syllabus, click on the hyperlinked course and section number.
Majors may count any one 2000-level class towards the WMS major. Only WST2322, 2611, or 2612 count towards the WMS minor; only WST2611 or 2612 count towards the TPS minor.

Introduction to Health Disparities

Laura K. Guyer
WST 2322 – Section 08GD
MWF 2; TUR L011; 3 Credits

This introductory course examines the multifaceted issue of health disparities through the lens of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, disability, and special populations. It also addresses the concepts of medically underserved areas/populations, health literacy, cultural competence, readability & linguistic appropriateness and social determinants of health as they relate to health equity.(WST: SS, G&S; GenEd: S, D Health Disparities: Core.)

Humanities Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality

Mallory Szymanski
WST 2611 – Section 1304
T 2, R 2-3; CSE E121; 3 Credits

This course uses close readings of cultural representations (in literature, the visual arts, movies, television, the internet, etc) to understand intersecting categories of identity such as gender, sexuality, class, and race. We will examine how such categories operate in everything from novels to YouTube to the evening news. (Gen Ed: H, D; Gordon Rule 2; WST: HUM; TPS)

Transnational Feminism

Jessica Jean Casler
WST 3415 – Section 08H0
MWF 5; TUR 1315; 3 Credits

This course places women and feminism in a transnational perspective, focusing on various theories and movements engendered by women in contemporary national contexts. Development, reproductive politics, women’s health, etc. will be examined. (WST: Core; Gen Ed: S, N)

Body Image and Health

Laura K. Guyer
WST 3930 – Section 03H8
T 2-3, R 2; TUR 2319; 3 Credits

This course uses theories from psychology, medicine, cultural and feminist studies to explore the personal, social and cultural factors related to the concept of body image.

Domestic Violence in the Black Community

Anquinetta V. Calhoun
WST 3930 – Section 122C
T 7, R 7-8; MCCA 1142; 3 Credits

This course explores domestic violence and intimate partner violence in the Black community. Drawing on materials and methodologies from a variety of disciplines, we will examine clinical, social, historical, literary, and personal experiences of domestic violence. We will also consider available resources & support, the distinct problems generated by multiple oppressions, intersections of gender, race & class, DV/IPV legislation, activism, healing, and recovery. (WST; HUM/SS)

Women in Hollywood, 1950 – Current

Carolyn Kelley
WST 3930 – Section 1591
MWF 7; LIT 0113, 3 Credits

This course examines the ways Hollywood cinema represents women by focusing on close readings of filmic texts (both discursive and formal elements) and blending these close readings with feminist theory/ feminist film theory in relation to the feminism versus post-feminism debate, “the chick flick,” the gaze, and the new Hollywood “Fempire.” We will also discuss types of women characters found in Hollywood films, such as “the working girl,” “the good wife/mother,” and” femme fatale.” Throughout the course, we will study how race, gender, sexual orientation, social class, and historical context intersect with Hollywood cinema. Films will include Alien (Ridley Scott, 1979), The Blue Gardenia (Fritz Lang, 1953), Body Heat (Lawrence Kasdan 1981), Bridesmaids (Paul Feig, 2011), The Children’s Hour (William Wyler 1961), Go Fish (Rose Troche 1994), Legally Blonde (Robert Luketic, 2001), Real Women Have Curves (Patricia Cardoso 2002), and Working Girl (Mike Nichols, 1988). Students who have not taken a prior film class will need to review an introductory film style guide/textbook before or during the semester. (WST: HUM)

Independent Study (Undergraduate)

STAFF
WST 4905 – Section Departmentally Controlled; Credits: 1-3

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair

For advanced undergraduate students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research. Online application.

Gendered History of American Medicine

Trysh Travis
WST 4930 – Section 09A3
T 4, R 4-5; TUR 2346; 3 Credits

This class surveys evolving ideas of health, sickness, and doctoring in the United States (with some attention to Western Europe) from the colonial period to the present. To organize this broad span of history, we will focus on the ways in which gender and sexuality have figured in the creation of patient and caregiver identities (What makes a “good” patient? Why see an OBGYN rather than a midwife?), the development of medical and public health institutions (the AMA, the Visiting Nurse Service), and the identification, diagnosis, and treatment of disease entities such as addiction, coronary heart disease, depression, headache, and erectile dysfunction. The ultimate aim of the course is to challenge the positivist claims of pure “science” by examining the ways in which historical context and social norms—including, though not exclusively norms of gender and sexuality—shape what “science” can see. (WST: HUM/SS/G&S).

Psychology of Human Sexuality

Laurie Mintz
WST 4930 – Section 14E7
T 9, R 9-10; NRN 0137, 3 Credits

This class will cover the topic of human sexuality from a psychological perspective. While some cross-cultural information will be included, the main focus will be sexuality in the United States. We will examine current research on sexuality. A wide range of topics will be covered including but not limited to: (1) Sexual responses; (2) Sexual practices; and (3) Sexual dysfunctions and their treatments. There will be a focus on understanding common misconceptions regarding sexuality and current controversies in the field. (WST: SS/G&S)

Women Writing About Race

Debra Walker King
WST 4930 – Section 1F51
M 3-5; TUR 2305, 3 Credits

This course surveys women’s writing during the late 20th Century to the present, focusing on gendered Black and White race relations as presented in their literature and in American culture critiques. Students will trace, analyze and discuss how Black and White women talk about each other, coop and reject each other, or, simply, ignore each other in literature as they and their characters negotiate gendered social, political, and personal challenges. (WST: HUM)

Psychology of Women

Bonnie Moradi
WST 4930- 15G7
WEB LECTURE; 3 Credits

Advanced seminar on psychological theories and research related to the psychology of women. The course also integrates consideration of the intersections of gender, race/ethnicity, class, sexual-orientation and other dimensions of diversity. (WST: SS)

Women and Islam

Zoharah Simmons
WST 4930 – Section 4352
T 8-9, R 9; AND 0034; 3 Credits

This course brings a feminist insider perspective to the volatile subject of “Women and Islam.” Most non-Muslims see Islam as the root cause of the oppression of women in the Muslim world. However, a growing number of Muslim women scholars and activists have begun to challenge the notions that Islam is synonymous with the oppression of women. In this course, we will review the history of the religion and women’s place in it, bringing to the foreground the significant role women played in Islam’s early history. We will also examine the situation of contemporary Muslim women from both the perspectives of Islamic Nationalists and Islamists. Both groups see women as a crucial component for the preservation of Islamic societies. (WST: HUM; IPG)

Capstone Seminar in Women’s Studies

Connie Shehan
WST4935 – Section 4900
T 8-9, R 9; UST 108; 3 Credit

This course (required for all majors) is the culmination of the Women’s Studies major. It explores some examples of past and present scholarship to reaffirm the interdisciplinary nature of the field and to highlight the relationships among feminist theory, intellectual practice, and social change. The bulk of the semester is devoted to a full-length independent project on a topic of student’s own choosing. (WST: Core for all tracks in major)

Internship (Undergraduate)

STAFF
WST 4940 – Section Departmentally Controlled; Credits 1-3

Prerequisite: Approval of the undergraduate coordinator. This course is designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. Click here for more information and an on-line application.

Practicum in Health Disparities

Laura K. Guyer
WST4941C- Section Departmentally Controlled
M 11E2; AND 0034; 3 Credits

WST 4941C is a capstone experience for seniors who have taken WST3930, Introduction to Health Disparities in Society. Students are matched with preceptors from community agencies working with under-served and disadvantaged populations. Students will learn about the agency and its organizational culture while applying concepts of cultural competence, linguistic appropriateness and health disparities. To register, contact Dr. Laura Guyer at lkguyer@ufl.edu. (Health Disparities: Core)

Women’s/Gender Honors Thesis

STAFF
WST 4970 – Section Departmentally Controlled; 3 Credits

Students register for this course when pursuing an Honors Thesis in the WST major. In accordance with the protocols established by WST and the Honors Program, students design and pursue an independent research project with guidance from an advisor. Guidelines for the thesis is available here; the application, available here, must be signed by the student, the advisor, and the other committee member(s) and submitted to the Undergraduate Coordinator by the last day of drop/add.

Fall 2014

NOTE: Letters in parenthesis indicate how the class fills a distribution requirement in the WST General Concentration and/or whether it counts for the TPS or IPG track in the major. If a course fills a GenEd requirement, that is specified separately. Click on the hyperlinks below for a course syllabus.

Introduction to Health Disparities

Laura K. Guyer
WST 2322 – Section 045A
MWF 2; MAT 0018; 3 Credits

This introductory course examines the multifaceted issue of health disparities through the lens of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, disability, and special populations. It also addresses the concepts of medically underserved areas/populations, health literacy, cultural competence, readability & linguistic appropriateness and social determinants of health as they relate to health equity.(WST: SS, G&S; GenEd: S, D; HDS Minor: Core.)

Humanities Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality

Carolyn Kelley
WST 2611 – Section 0167
MWF 4; TUR 2319; 3 Credits

This course uses close readings of cultural representations (in literature, the visual arts, movies, television, the internet, etc…) to understand intersecting categories of identity such as gender, sexuality, class, and race. We will examine how such categories operate in everything from novels to YouTube to the evening news. (WST: HUM; TPS; GenEd: H, D; Gordon Rule 2000)

Interdisciplinary Perspectives in Women’s Studies

Patricia A. Travis
WST 3015 – Section 04E6
W 11-E2; AND 0134; 3 Credits

Drawing on materials and methodologies from a variety of disciplines, this class explores the diverse experiences of women, both in past eras and in the present, in the U.S. and abroad. Required for the Women’s Studies major and minor; fulfills the General Education requirement in diversity. (WST: Core; Gen Ed: H, SS, D and Gordon Rule 4000)

Sexualities Studies

Kendal Broad-Wright
WST 3603 – Section 1E45
T 4, R 4-5; CSE E11, FLG 0280; 3 Credits

Sexualities Studies is the interdisciplinary study of sexualities covering diverse theories of sexualities and desire, and how these theories are socially constructed and regulated. Central to the class will be the connections between sexualities and other social locators such as race, ethnicity, gender, social class, age and ability or disability.(WST: SS; TPS: Core; GenEd: SS)

Women’s Diversity in U.S. History

Mallory Szymanski
WST 3930 – Section 07C2
T 5-6, R 6; TUR 2319; 3 Credits

This course explores the history of women in the United States from 1500 to the present by focusing on such social differences as ethnicity, class, race, age and sexual orientation. (WST: HUM, SS)

Women’s Health and Well-Being

Laura Guyer
WST 3930 – Section 07DE
T 2-3, R 3; TUR 2322; 3 Credits

This course draws on a range of social science, pre-professional/professional and public health disciplines to examine the health and well-being of women. The Holistic Model of Health will be used to explore the physical, social, emotional and spiritual aspects of women’s health. Health issues across the lifespan will be examined: health disparities, clinical trials, sexual identity, women of color, chronic disease, mental health, tobacco use, substance abuse, domestic violence and care giving. (WST: SS; HDS Minor: Tier 1)

Gender and Hebrew Bible

Robert Kawashima
WST 3930 – Section 093D
M 8, W 8-9; AND 0134, AND 0101; 3 Credits

This course will provide a critical examination of the literary representation and historical realities of gender and sexuality in ancient Israel through close readings of selected texts from the Hebrew Bible. (WST: HUM; IPG)

Women in Politics

Lynn Leverty
WST 3930 – Section 1H90
T 5-6, R 6; AND 0101, AND 0034; 3 Credits

This course will provide a critical examination of the literary representation and historical realities of gender and sexuality in ancient Israel through close readings of selected texts from the Hebrew Bible. (WST: SS)

History of Black Women’s Health

Evan Hart
WST 3930 – Section 15ED
MWF 6, MCCA 2196; 3 Credits

This course explores black women’s health issues in American history from the eighteenth through the twentieth centuries. In particular we will examine the personal experiences and medical views of black women’s life cycle events, the roles of black women as patients, providers and activists, and the effects of race and gender on perceptions of health, wellness and illness. (WST: HUM/SS; HDS Minor: Tier 1)

Independent Study

Faculty
Variable Credits 1-3; Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 4905 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair

For advanced undergraduate students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research. Online Application.

Toni Morrison

Debra Walker King
WST 4930 – Section 09H9
M 9-11; TUR 2336; 3 Credits

This course introduces students to an extraordinary woman whose work, both fictional and critical, has shaken the foundations of American literature (and criticism) to reconstitute both it and the boundaries of its canon. Students will investigate why critics herald Toni Morrison as the “most formally sophisticated novelist in the history of African-American literature” while also discovering why she is its most renowned. Morrison’s work has earned the highest accolades in contemporary literary circles: the National Book Critics Circle Award and the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters Award for Song of Solomon in 1977, the Pulitzer Prize and the Robert F. Kennedy Award for Beloved in 1988, and the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1993 (among others). Her novels explore themes of naturalistic fiction while also engaging the more dramatic themes of modernism: death, love, rebirth, responsibility, and memory. They are lyrical prose memorials to suffering and loss that move beyond characters’ victimization towards rectification, reconciliation, renewal and revival. Toni Morrison has published ten novels, a play, a short story and several critical pieces. This semester we will read most of her fiction and some of her non-fiction, focusing on several themes. Among them are the relationship of the sacred to the secular, history and heritage, identity and subjectivity, language and rhetorical strategy, motherhood and self, life and love. We will also evaluate what critics have to say about Morrison, how they construct and reconstruct the artist and her work, as well as evaluate the author’s own creative and critical perspectives. (WST: HUM)

Sociolinguistics of Gender and Language

Diana Boxer
WST 4930 – Section 2D17
T 4, R 4-5; MAT 0003; 3 Credits

Have you ever wondered why people who say they are not sexist (or racist) nevertheless act in ways that are sexist (& racist)? Have you ever wondered why you feel excluded even when material is said to be inclusive? Have you ever wondered what it means for a language to be sexist? Have you ever wondered what language structure has to do with sexism (& racism)? This course will give you a guidebook around the sinkholes of English that sabotage even people of good will who ideologically, and ethically, would choose to be non_sexist (& non_racist). We will look, briefly, at some of the other ways in which other human beings have organized their interrelationships through grammars that incorporate other organizational principles. (WST: SS)

Internship

Faculty
Variable Credits 1-3; Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 4940 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of undergraduate coordinator

Designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues.

Click here for more information and an on-line application.

Practicum in Health Disparities

Laura K. Guyer
WST 4941C – Section Departmentally Controlled
M 10E1; TUR B310; 3 Credits

WST 4941C is a capstone experience for seniors who have taken WST3930, Introduction to Health Disparities in Society. Students are matched with preceptors from community agencies working with under-served and disadvantaged populations. Students will learn about the agency and its organizational culture while applying concepts of cultural competence, linguistic appropriateness and health disparities. To register, contact Dr. Laura Guyer. (HD: Core)

Women’s/Gender Honors Thesis

Faculty
3 Credits; WST 4970- Section Department Controlled

Students register for this course when pursuing an Honors Thesis in the WST major. In accordance with the protocols established by WST and the Honors Program, students design and pursue an independent research project with guidance from an advisor. Guidelines for the Honors Thesis are available here and the Application for the Honors Thesis is here.

Summer 2014

Introduction to Health Disparities in Society

Laura K. Guyer
WST 2322 – Section 0197
(Summer A) MTWRF 2; AND 0034; 3 Credits

This introductory course examines the multifaceted issue of health disparities through the lens of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, disability, and special populations. It also addresses the concepts of medically underserved areas/populations, health literacy, cultural competence, readability & linguistic appropriateness and social determinants of health as they relate to health equity. (WST: SS, G&S; HDS Minor: Core)

Humanities Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality

Carolyn A. Kelley
WST 2611 – Section 4794
(Summer B) MTWRF 4; TUR 2319; 3 Credits

This course uses close readings of cultural representations (in literature, the visual arts, movies, television, the internet, etc) to understand intersecting categories of identity such as gender, sexuality, class, and race. We will examine how such categories operate in everything from novels to YouTube to the evening news. (WST: HUM; TPS; Gen Ed: H, D)

Social Science Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality

Mallory Szymanski
WST 2612 – Section 4797
(Summer B) MTWRF 5; TUR 2319; 3 Credits

This course considers the social contruction of gender, sexuality, race, class, and other identity categories. Readings focus on families and cultural groups mainly in the U.S. but with attention to other nations. Subjects as intimate as the body and violence and as pervasive as politics and the law are included. We emphasize differences in daily life experiences of health care, education, sports, and religion. Finally, we examine the potential of movements for social change. (WST: SS; TPS; Gen Ed: SS, D)

Independent Study (Undergraduate)

Staff
1-3 Credits, Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 4905 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair For advanced undergraduate students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research.Online application.

Internship (Undergraduate)

Staff
1-3 Credits, Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 4940 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair Designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. Click here for more information and an on-line application.

Spring 2014

NOTE: Letters in parenthesis indicate whether the class fills the Humanities of Social Science distribution requirement in the WST General Concentration and/or whether it counts for the TPS or IPG track in the major. If a course fills a Gen Ed requirement, that is specified separately. To view a syllabus, click on the hyperlinked course and section number.

Introduction to Health Disparities

Laura K. Guyer
WST 2322 – Section 08GD
MWF 2; TUR L005; 3 Credits

This introductory course examines the multifaceted issue of health disparities through the lens of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, disability, and special populations. It also addresses the concepts of medically underserved areas/populations, health literacy, cultural competence, readability & linguistic appropriateness and social determinants of health as they relate to health equity.(WST: SS; GenEd: S, D) Health Disparities: Core.

Humanities Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality

Kristin F. Allukian
WST 2611 – Section 02E2
MWF 3; LIT 0121; 3 Credits

This course uses close readings of cultural representations (in literature, the visual arts, movies, television, the internet, etc) to understand intersecting categories of identity such as gender, sexuality, class, and race. We will examine how such categories operate in everything from novels to YouTube to the evening news. (Gen Ed: H, D, Gordon Rule 2; WST: H; TPS)

Transnational Feminism

Anita Anantharam
WST 3415 – Section 08H0
T 5-6, R 6; TUR 2333; 3 Credits

This course places women and feminism in a transnational perspective, focusing on various theories and movements engendered by women in contemporary national contexts. Development, reproductive politics, women’s health, etc. will be examined. (WST: Core; Gen Ed: S, N)

Sexualities Studies

Kathryn L. Nutter
WST 3603 – Section 02F5
T 4, R 4-5; TUR L011; 3 Credits

Sexualities Studies is the interdisciplinary study of sexualities covering diverse theories of sexualities and desire, and how these theories are socially constructed and regulated. Central to the class will be the connections between sexualities and other social locators such as race, ethnicity, gender, social class, age and ability or disability.(H, SS, D,WST: SS; TPS:Core)

Women’s Literature of Brazil

Charles A. Perrone
WST 3930 – Section 03H8
T 6-7, R 7; MAT 0009; 3 Credits

Readings of Brazilian novels, short stories, poetry and plays by women, and select corresponding criticism. Consideration of historical antecedents to internationally-known twentieth-century voices such as Clarice Lispector. Issues of discussion include canon formation, concepts of innovation, emancipation, feminism and animal rights, and the challenges of translation. (H, IPG)

Women in Hollywood, 1950 – Current

Carolyn Kelley
WST 3930 – Section 1591
MWF 4; LIT 0121, 3 Credits

This course examines the ways Hollywood cinema represents women by focusing on close readings of filmic texts (both discursive and formal elements) and blending these close readings with feminist theory/ feminist film theory in relation to the feminism versus post-feminism debate, “the chick flick,” the gaze, and the new Hollywood “Fempire.” We will also discuss types of women characters found in Hollywood films, such as “the working girl,” “the good wife/mother,” and” femme fatale.” Throughout the course, we will study how race, gender, sexual orientation, social class, and historical context intersect with Hollywood cinema. Films will include Alien (Ridley Scott, 1979), The Blue Gardenia (Fritz Lang, 1953), Body Heat (Lawrence Kasdan 1981), Bridesmaids (Paul Feig, 2011), The Children’s Hour (William Wyler 1961), Go Fish (Rose Troche 1994), Legally Blonde (Robert Luketic, 2001), Real Women Have Curves (Patricia Cardoso 2002), and Working Girl (Mike Nichols, 1988). Students who have not taken a prior film class will need to review an introductory film style guide/textbook before or during the semester. (WST: H)

Independent Study (Undergraduate)

STAFF
WST 4905 – Section Departmentally Controlled; Credits: 1-3

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair

For advanced undergraduate students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research. Online application.

Early LGBT Literature

Jodi R. Schorb
WST 4930 – Section 04B9
T 7, R 7-8; TUR 2333; 3 Credits

The course will hone your ability to draw from primary and secondary sources to research, discuss, and craft written arguments about the following: How did ‘queer’ early American texts circulate, and for what purpose? Who wrote and read these texts, and why? What does focusing on the representation of same-sex desire or a text’s queer plots and possibilities help us better see and understand within any given text? In what ways does a piece of literature reflect existing beliefs, and in what ways does literature challenge existing beliefs and create new sexual knowledge? And most crucially, how did artists who felt personally removed from normative definitions of sexuality imagine their own sexual selves, seek models through the creation of a queer past, and invent a new language of sexual possibility through literature? (H, TPS)

Women and Therapy

Patricia A. Travis
WST 4930 – Section 08ED
T 4, R 4-5; TUR 2336, TUR 2346; 3 Credits

Contemporary “psychology” had its origins in the 19th century treatment of mad women. Today, men constitute the bulk of in-patient mental health clients, while the vast majority of out-patient services go to women, who are diagnosed with depression, anxiety, and related somatic complaints at approximately three times the rate of men. Unsurprisingly, women are the largest consumes of “self-help” culture as well. And at the same time, the American Psychological Association estimates that 75% of postgraduate students in psychology and related fields today are women. This class examines the relationship between women and therapy as it has evolved since the 19th century, looking at women both as patients and as practitioners. While attending to the bio- and neurological dimensions of mental illness, it is grounded in a social constructivist approach, and draws on history, literature, and feminist and critical theory as well as clinical writings. Attention will be paid to traditionally “female complaints,” including hysteria (and its contemporary analogue, borderline personality disorder), eating disorders, and depression as well as to the innovations of feminist therapy and multicultural counseling. Students will do weekly short papers and a substantial final project. Although the class will not dwell at length on the psychoanalytic theories of Sigmund Freud, the class presumes some knowledge of Freud, if for no other reason than to understand both his continued utility and the feminist critique of him. Students should purchase and read Freud for Beginners (Appignanesi and Zarate; available through amazon.com) in preparation for the first class meeting. Open to undergraduates by permission of the instructor; email ttravis@ufl.edu to discuss admission to the class. (H, SS)

Women’s Health and Well-Being

Laura K. Guyer
WST 4930 – Section 09A3
W 6-8; TUR 2328, 3 Credits

This course draws on a range of social science, pre-professional/professional and public health disciplines to examine the health and well-being of women. The Holistic Model of Health will be used to explore the physical, social, emotional and spiritual aspects of women’s health. Health issues across the lifespan will be examined: health disparities, clinical trials, sexual identity, women of color, chronic disease, mental health, tobacco use, substance abuse, domestic violence and care giving. (SS)

Feminist Anthropology

Florence E. Babb
WST 4930- Section Departmentally Controlled
M 6-8; UST 0108; 3 Credits

This advanced seminar will consider issues in feminist anthropology through reading and discussing theory, research, and exemplary scholarship in the field. We will ask challenging questions about feminist anthropology and the dilemmas of field research, including the fundamental question of whether there is indeed a feminist ethnographic methodology. We will discuss the feminist politics of ethnographic representation (by the researcher depicting the researched) and of positionality (of the researcher in relation to the researched). Studies from a wide range of societies will present opportunities for students to consider the relative merits of various approaches in feminist anthropology. Seminar participants will write position papers as well as a final paper, which will be presented at the end of the semester. Undergraduate registration with instructor approval. Dr. Florence Babb (SS, IPG)

Race and Labor in Women’s Autobiographies

Kristen Allukian
WST 4930 – Section 1137
W, 7-9; FLI 0113; 3 Credits

This course focuses on the autobiographies of four nineteenth-century black women—Sojourner Truth, Eliza Potter, Harriet Wilson, and Elizabeth Keckley—and moves their labor to the center of our discussion. These former slaves and freeborn black women valorized their labor at a time when women’s work, and especially black women’s work, was increasingly devalued and disparaged. As we read these autobiographies, we will consider the following questions: how do these writers characterize the nature of their labor? How do they posit the relationship between themselves, their work, and national identity?

In what ways does their wage labor double as cultural labor? (H)

Women and Islam

Zoharah Simmons
WST 4930 – Section 4352
T 4, R 4-5; MAT 0009, TUR 2333; 3 Credits

This course brings a feminist insider perspective to the volatile subject of “Women and Islam.” Most non-Muslims see Islam as the root cause of the oppression of women in the Muslim world. However, a growing number of Muslim women scholars and activists have begun to challenge the notions that Islam is synonymous with the oppression of women. In this course, we will review the history of the religion and women’s place in it, bringing to the foreground the significant role women played in Islam’s early history. We will also examine the situation of contemporary Muslim women from both the perspectives of Islamic Nationalists and Islamists. Both groups see women as a crucial component for the preservation of Islamic societies. (WST: H; IPG)

Capstone Seminar in Women’s Studies

Tace Hedrick
WST4935 – Section 4900
T 8-9, R 9; MAT 0051; 3 Credits

This course (required for all majors) is the culmination of the Women’s Studies major. It explores some examples of past and present scholarship to reaffirm the interdisciplinary nature of the field and to highlight the relationships among feminist theory, intellectual practice, and social change. The bulk of the semester is devoted to a full-length independent project on a topic of student’s own choosing. (Core for all tracks in major)

Internship (Undergraduate)

STAFF
WST 4940 – Section Departmentally Controlled; Credits 1-3

Prerequisite: Approval of the undergraduate coordinator. This course is designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. Click here for more information and an on-line application.

Practicum in Health Disparities

Laura K. Guyer
WST4941C- Section Departmentally Controlled
M 11E2; TUR 2303; 3 Credits

WST 4941C is a capstone experience for seniors who have taken WST3930, Introduction to Health Disparities in Society. Students are matched with preceptors from community agencies working with under-served and disadvantaged populations. Students will learn about the agency and its organizational culture while applying concepts of cultural competence, linguistic appropriateness and health disparities. To register, contact Dr. Laura Guyer at lkguyer@ufl.edu. (HD: Core)

Women’s/Gender Honors Thesis

STAFF
WST 4970 – Section Departmentally Controlled; 3 Credits

Students register for this course when pursuing an Honors Thesis in the WST major. In accordance with the protocols established by WST and the Honors Program, students design and pursue an independent research project with guidance from an advisor. Further information on the content and procedures for the thesis is available here; the application, which must be signed by the student, the advisor, and the other committee member(s) and submitted to the Undergraduate Coordinator by the last day of drop/add, is available here.

Fall 2013

NOTE: Letters in parenthesis indicate how the class fills a distribution requirement in the WST General Concentration and/or whether it counts for the TPS or IPG track in the major. If a course fills a GenEd requirement, that is specified separately.

Introduction to Health Disparities

Laura K. Guyer
WST 2322 – Section 045A
MWF 2; FAB 0105; 3 Credits

This introductory course examines the multifaceted issue of health disparities through the lens of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, disability, and special populations. It also addresses the concepts of medically underserved areas/populations, health literacy, cultural competence, readability & linguistic appropriateness and social determinants of health as they relate to health equity.(WST: SS; GenEd: S, D) Health Disparities: Core. Click here for syllabus.

Humanities Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality

Carolyn Kelley
WST 2611 – Section 0167
MWF 4; TUR 2319; 3 Credits

This course uses close readings of cultural representations (in literature, the visual arts, movies, television, the internet, etc) to understand intersecting categories of identity such as gender, sexuality, class, and race. We will examine how such categories operate in everything from novels to YouTube to the evening news. (WST: H; TPS; GenEd: H, D; Gordon Rule 2000) Click here for syllabus.

Interdisciplinary Perspectives in Women’s Studies

Patricia A. Travis
WST 3015 – Section 04E6
T 10E1; AND 0134; 3 Credits

Drawing on materials and methodologies from a variety of disciplines, this class explores the diverse experiences of women, both in past eras and in the present, in the U.S. and abroad. Required for the Women’s Studies major and minor; fulfills the General Education requirement in diversity. (Gen Ed: H, SS, D, Gordon Rule 4; WST: Core) Click here for syllabus.

Gender, Culture and Development

Florence Babb
WST 3930 – Section 07C2
T 8-9, R 9; TUR 1315; 3 Credits

This course will consider classic writings and debates since the 1970s relating to gender and development and then consider recent writings that assess and critique conventional development models. While the scope will be global, there will be considerable attention to work based in Latin America and to such questions as how alternative approaches to gender, culture, and development may be more inclusive of diverse peoples and grassroots movements for change. (H/SS; IPG) Click here for syllabus.

Women in French Literature and/or Cinema

Carol Murphy
WST 3930 – Section 093D
MWF 7; AND 0013; 3 Credits

In this course we will explore representative works by some of the most powerful and influential French and Francophone women writers of the 20th and 21st centuries as they reflect on the role of family dynamics in the shaping of their identities. Camaraderie, conflict, cultural dislocation, and oftentimes turbulent explorations of self through a family other—sibling or parent—mark these texts as meditations on familial relationships.(H;IPG) Click here for syllabus.

Hebrew Goddess

Patricia Woods
WST 3930 – Section 15G0
MWF 5; WM0202; 3 Credits

This course investigates the Goddess in Ancient Israelite religion as it moves from inclusion of both feminine and masculine aspects of the Divine to a strict form of monotheism associated with only a masculine God. There is less debate about the role of the Goddess or the feminine aspect of the Divine in other religions of the Ancient world. However, in part because of the political climate today, the topic of the Hebrew Goddess remains controversial. We will analyze some of these controversies as well as the evidence for the feminine aspect of the Divine in Ancient Israel. Click here for syllabus.

Independent Study

Faculty
Variable Credits 1-3; Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 4905 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair

For advanced undergraduate students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research. Online Application.

Social Movements

Kendal Broad-Wright
WST 4930 – Section 047G
T 4, R 4-5; FLG 0245, FAC 0120; 3 Credits

“Social movements are conscious, concerted and sustained efforts by ordinary people to change some aspect of their society by using extra-institutional means.” (Goodwin and Jasper, 2004, pg. 3). This course will provide an overview of the interdisciplinary (mostly sociological) research and theory about social movements. The course will address various questions central to understanding social movements (e.g., who joins a movement? How are movements organized? How do institutions influence movements?). In addition, the course will include readings and research about various social movements (e.g., Civil Rights movement, Farmworkers movements, Women’s Movements, Environmental Justice movement, and LGBTQ movements). (SS) Click here for syllabus.

Feminist Fictions

Tace Hedrick
WST 4930 – Section 048A
T 7, R 7-8; TUR 2333, TUR 2336; 3 Credits

In this course, we will be reading some of the better-known United States feminist narratives written from 1973 to the early 2000s. We will be looking at historical context, genre, style, and other issues in order to think about what shaped the concerns of feminism, and how these concerns were expressed in narrative form. (H) Click here for syllabus.

Gender and Diaspora

Anita Anantharam
WST 4930 – Section 048B
M 6-8; TUR 2333; 3 Credits

Diaspora is defined as the movement or the scattering of people away from their homeland. Originally used to describe the exodus of Jews from their home, diaspora, as it is used today, refers to a wide range of ethnic groups and communities who have experienced forced expulsion due to slavery, indentured-labor, colonialism, ethnic or religious violence, and environmental disasters such as tsunamis and famine. In this class we will consider the ways in which women and men of the Asian and African diaspora identify and/or refuse their cultural ties to their homelands, the cohesion or trauma that this creates in their lives, and the sense of belonging or loss that they feel as a result of their migration. This is a split undergraduate and graduate-level class and the requirements and readings for the two sections will be different. (H;IPG) Click here for syllabus.

Sociolinguistics of Gender and Language

Diana Boxer
WST 4930 – Section 0592
T 4, R 4-5; CBD 0210; 3 Credits

Have you ever wondered why people who say they are not sexist (or racist) nevertheless act in ways that are sexist (& racist)? Have you ever wondered why you feel excluded even when material is said to be inclusive? Have you ever wondered what it means for a language to be sexist? Have you ever wondered what language structure has to do with sexism (& racism)? This course will give you a guidebook around the sinkholes of English that sabotage even people of good will who ideologically, and ethically, would choose to be non_sexist (& non_racist). We will look, briefly, at some of the other ways in which other human beings have organized their interrelationships through grammars that incorporate other organizational principles. (SS) Click here for syllabus.

Queer Autobiography

Kimberly Lynn Emery
WST 4930 – Section 09H9
W 9-11; TUR 2333; 3 Credits

This course explores autobiography, memoir, and autobiographical fiction produced by LGBTQ writers in the US, post-Stonewall. Because queer self-fashioning has, historically, most often occured within hostile and/or uncomprehending environments, we will seek to contextualize our readings not only in relation to the larger literary tradition of life writing, but also in connection to the theoretical and historical frameworks of specifically queer self-invention and representation. (H; TPS) Click here for syllabus.

Sylvia Plath and Her Cultural Afterlife

Marsha Bryant
WST 4930 – Section 0902
MWF 3; TUR 2334; 3 Credits

By the time she was named one of Time magazine’s 100 Artists and Entertainers of the Century in 1998, Sylvia Plath had become literary culture’s ultimate commodity. From her photo-shoot in the Cambridge Varsity during her Fulbright years to Christine Jeff’s film Sylvia, Plath enters the cultural imagination as text and image, a person and a mythic figure. This course will explore Plath’s literary career and her cultural afterlife through close study of her poems, her novel, her journals, and her critical reception. We will also consider Plath in the context of the popular and literary magazines that first published her poetry, and her contemporary status in the media. Our texts will include Collected Poems, The Bell Jar, Ariel Restored, Unabridged Journals, a recent biography, a critical study, and the online journal Plath Profiles. If time permits, we will also study Ted Hughes’s Birthday Letters. Assignments will include two papers, a panel presentation, a parody, and engaged participation. (H) Click here for syllabus.

Queer Cinema

Barbara Caroline Mennel
WST 4930 – Section 091A
T 5-6, R 6; TUR 2322; 3 Credits

Queer Cinema This course introduces students to the intersection of film studies and queer theory. It traces the history of dominant genres, such as the activist documentary and the melodrama, and discusses key concepts, such as camp and trash. Based on the question whether the depiction of gay and lesbian desire has produced a distinct queer film aesthetic, we will investigate the paradox of socially imposed invisibility and the visibility inherent in the medium film. “Queer Cinema” provides an overview of the history of gay and lesbian cinema organized around its key periods. (H; TPS) Click here for syllabus.

Psychology of Human Sexuality

Laurie Mintz
WST 4930 – Section 093A
T 7, R 7-8; CSE A101; 3 Credits

This class will cover the topic of human sexuality from a psychological perspective. We will examine current research on sexuality. A wide range of topics will be covered including but not limited to: 1) Sexual responses; 2) Sexual practices; and 3) Sexual dysfunctions and the treatments for them. There will be a focus on understanding common misconceptions regarding sexuality and current controversies in the field. (SS; TPS) Click here for syllabus.

African Development and Gender Equality

Renata Serra
WST 4930 – Section 1A22
T 6, R 6-7; MAT 0115; 3 Credits

How does gender discrimination look like across Africa? What are thesocial and economic domains in which women are more/less empowered? Why do projects aiming at improving women’s lives often fail? The course addresses these questions by examining gender norms and relationships across Sub-Saharan Africa, within the context of development theory and practice. Students will reflect on the complexity of the issues at stake, and identify overlapping aspects of subordination and empowerment, global constraints and local resistance. The aim is to question existing stereotypes about gender roles and relationships in developing countries, while thinking constructively of feasible and valid policy approaches. (SS; IPG) Click here for syllabus.

Women’s Health and Well-Being

Laura Guyer
WST 4930 – Section 1537
W 6-8; TBA; 3 Credits

This course draws on a range of social science, pre-professional/professional and public health disciplines to examine the health and well-being of women. The Holistic Model of Health will be used to explore the physical, social, emotional and spiritual aspects of women’s health. Health issues across the lifespan will be examined: health disparities, clinical trials, sexual identity, women of color, chronic disease, mental health, tobacco use, substance abuse, domestic violence and care giving. (HD) Click here for syllabus.

Internship

Faculty
Variable Credits 1-3; Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 4940 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of undergraduate coordinator

Designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues.
Click here for more information and an on-line application.

Women’s/Gender Honors Thesis

Faculty
3 Credits; WST 4970- Section Department Controlled

Students register for this course when pursuing an Honors Thesis in the WST major. In accordance with the protocols established by WST and the Honors Program, students design and pursue an independent research project with guidance from an advisor. Guidelines for the Honors Thesis are available here and the Application for the Honors Thesis is here.

Summer 2013

Introduction to Health Disparities in Society

Laura K. Guyer
WST 2322 – Section 0197
(Summer A) MTWRF 2; MAT 0016; 3 Credits

This introductory course examines the multifaceted issue of health disparities through the lens of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, disability, and special populations. It also addresses the concepts of medically underserved areas/populations, health literacy, cultural competence, readability & linguistic appropriateness and social determinants of health as they relate to health equity. (SS, G&S)

Humanities Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality

Carolyn A. Kelley
WST 2611 – Section 4794
(Summer B) MTWRF 4; TUR 2319; 3 Credits

This course uses close readings of cultural representations (in literature, the visual arts, movies, television, the internet, etc) to understand intersecting categories of identity such as gender, sexuality, class, and race. We will examine how such categories operate in everything from novels to YouTube to the evening news. (Gen Ed: H, D; WST: H, TPS)

Social Science Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality

Mallory Szymanski
WST 2612 – Section 4797
(Summer B) MTWRF 5; TUR 2319; 3 Credits

This course considers the social contruction of gender, sexuality, race, class, and other identity categories. Readings focus on families and cultural groups mainly in the U.S. but with attention to other nations. Subjects as intimate as the body and violence and as pervasive as politics and the law are included. We emphasize differences in daily life experiences of health care, education, sports, and religion. Finally, we examine the potential of movements for social change. (Gen Ed: SS, D; WST: SS, TPS)

Independent Study (Undergraduate)

Staff
1-3 Credits, Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 4905 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair For advanced undergraduate students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research.Online application.

Internship (Undergraduate)

Staff
1-3 Credits, Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 4940 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair Designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. Click here for more information and an on-line application.

Spring 2013

NOTE: Letters in parenthesis indicate whether the class fills the Humanities of Social Science distribution requirement in the WST General Concentration and/or whether it counts for the TPS or IPG track in the major. If a course fills a Gen Ed requirement, that is specified separately.

Humanities Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality

Caroline J.S. (Kay) Picart
WST 2611 – Section 02E2
MWF 4; AND 0134; 3 Credits

This course uses close readings of cultural representations (in literature, the visual arts, movies, television, the internet, etc) to understand intersecting categories of identity such as gender, sexuality, class, and race. We will examine how such categories operate in everything from novels to YouTube to the evening news. (Gen Ed: H, D, Gordon Rule 6; WST: H; TPS)

Sexualities Studies

Kendal Broad-Wright
WST 3603 – Section 02F5
T, 5-6, R 6; AND 0134; 3 Credits

Sexualities Studies is the interdisciplinary study of sexualities covering diverse theories of sexualities and desire, and how these theories are socially constructed and regulated. Central to the class will be the connections between sexualities and other social locators such as race, ethnicity, gender, social class, age and ability or disability.(Gen Ed: H, SS, D, Gordon Rule 4; WST: SS; TPS:Core)

Women and Fashion in French Cinema

Sylvie E. Blum
WST 3930 – Section 08DA
T9-11, W9-11; TUR 2334, TUR 2322; 4 Credits

The class is tailored around the theme of women’s fashion and style in French culture. The perspective will be developed through the lens of literature, film and theory spanning over several decades of the twentieth century. The material bridges different areas of cultural and film studies. Through various readings, film screenings, virtual site visits, the student will acquire the necessary tools and terminology to decode the system and what distinguishes style from fashion in France, in a multidisciplinary approach. Areas covered include architecture, design, advertisement, theater costumes and film. The course is taught in English; it is designed for students who are already versed in exploring and analyzing certain literary and cultural texts. It may count toward the French major, minor and or as an elective. The students will familiarize themselves with the proper terminology, and acquire knowledge in this domain that is rich in history and cultural markers. The readings contain biographical and personal narratives, as well as theoretical and cultural essays about France. The films screenings go back to classical French cinema, as well as recent documentary and popular films (WST: H; IPG)

Gender and Sexuality in Antiquity

Konstantinos Kapparis
WST 3930 – Section 1A77
T, 10-E1; TUR L011, 3 Credits

The course will explore perceptions of the masculine and feminine in Ancient Greece and Rome, discussing these stereotypes in their political, social, economic and cultural contexts. (WST: H)

The Gendered History of American Medicine

Trysh A. Travis
WST 3930- Section 1036
T 7, R 7-8; TUR 2354; 3 Credits (HONORS)

This class surveys evolving ideas of health, sickness, and doctoring in the United States (with some attention to Western Europe) from the colonial period to the present. To organize this broad span of history, we will focus on the ways in which gender and sexuality have figured in the creation of patient and caregiver identities (What makes a “good” patient? Why see an OBGYN rather than a midwife?), the development of medical and public health institutions (the AMA, the Visiting Nurse Service), and the identification, diagnosis, and treatment of disease entities such as addiction, coronary heart disease, depression, headache, and erectile dysfunction. The ultimate aim of the course is to challenge the positivist claims of pure “science” by examining the ways in which historical context and social norms—including, though not exclusively norms of gender and sexuality—shape what “science” can see. (H/SS).

Women in Hollywood, 1950 – Current

Carolyn Kelley
WST 3930 – Section 1591
MWF 3; TUR 1315, 3 Credits

This course examines the ways Hollywood cinema represents women by focusing on close readings of filmic texts (both discursive and formal elements) and blending these close readings with feminist theory/ feminist film theory in relation to the feminism versus post-feminism debate, “the chick flick,” the gaze, and the new Hollywood “Fempire.” We will also discuss types of women characters found in Hollywood films, such as “the working girl,” “the good wife/mother,” and” femme fatale.” Throughout the course, we will study how race, gender, sexual orientation, social class, and historical context intersect with Hollywood cinema. Films will include Alien (Ridley Scott, 1979), The Blue Gardenia (Fritz Lang, 1953), Body Heat (Lawrence Kasdan 1981), Bridesmaids (Paul Feig, 2011), The Children’s Hour (William Wyler 1961), Go Fish (Rose Troche 1994), Legally Blonde (Robert Luketic, 2001), Real Women Have Curves (Patricia Cardoso 2002), and Working Girl (Mike Nichols, 1988). Students who have not taken a prior film class will need to review an introductory film style guide/textbook before or during the semester. (WST: H)

Gender and Food Politics

Anita Anantharam
WST 3930 – Section 1943
T 4, R 4-5; AND 0134; 3 Credits

The past few years have been witness to a burgeoning of scholarship and literature on food. Hit-movies like Julie and Julia and best-selling fiction like Eat, Pray, Love, have brought into the American psyche the role and place of food in our lives. This class will focus on Gender and Transnational Food Politics on three continents: in Europe, North America, and South Asia. The course will provide a historical context for contemporary environmental and anti-globalization activism within the European Union, in the European colonial encounters in North Africa and Asia, and in modern-day nations of South and Southeast Asia and North America. This class will require a service learning component. (WST:SS/H; IPG)

Motherhood in Modern Hebrew Literature

Avraham, Balaban
WST 3930 – Section 5331
T 4, R 4-5; FAC 0120; 3 Credits

Israel was founded on expressed ideas of a complete equality between the sexes. Yet, until the last two decades of the twentieth century, Hebrew fiction was mainly a male domain, and women were rarely depicted as full blown human beings. In the last two decades a new wave of female writers started publishing their work, and the image of women has become much richer and more diverse. The rationale of the course is to explore the different manners women are depicted in Hebrew fiction throughout the twentieth century. Special attention is given to the changes that occurred in the last two decades, with the appearance of a new wave of female writers. NO HEBREW KNOWLEDGE IS REQUIRED. (GenEd: H, N; WST: H, IPG)

Independent Study (Undergraduate)

STAFF
WST 4905 – Section Departmentally Controlled; Credits: 1-3

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair

For advanced undergraduate students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research. Online application.

Queer Theory

Kimberly L. Emery
WST 4930 – Section 08ED
T 7, R 7-8, TUR 1315; 3 Credits

This course is an overview of major concerns, methodologies and texts in queer theory, illuminating the theoretical insights, assumptions and implications of various constructions of gender, sex and sexuality. (WST: H; TPS: Core)

Psychology of Women

Banafsheh Moradi
WST 4930 – Section 1D00
WEB LECTURE; 3 Credits

Advanced seminar on psychological theories and research related to the psychology of women. The course also integrates consideration of the intersections of gender, race/ethnicity, class, sexual-orientation and other dimensions of diversity. (WST: SS)

Anthropology of Pregnancy and Birth

Alyson G. Young
WST 4930 – Section 4352
M 3-5; MAT 0002; 3 Credits

This course uses a biocultural life course approach to examine variability in health among mothers across the world. The class focuses on several aspects of maternal heath including reproductive ecology and determinants of fertility, maternal-fetal nutrition, birth experience and the political ecology of maternal health. Each of these topics has a long history, and could be covered in an individual course, but this class endeavors to provide a systematic overview and foundation for understanding issues associated with global maternal health and the anthropology of reproduction across the life course. (H, SS)

Gender and International Relations

Laura E. Sjoberg
WST 4930 – Section 5795
T, 5-6; TUR 2305, R 6; TUR 2306; 3 Credits

Around the world, despite women’s progress, there continues to be a relatively rigid gender division of labor, between paid and unpaid work, according to economic sector, and along hierarchies. Though women do participate in the political process in most states, they are underrepresented in governments and their decision-making. Around the world, men dominate international security apparatuses and the making and fighting of wars. The global gender order makes possible the global political order. This course explores feminist explorations of that gendered global political order, methodologically and substantively, with focuses on political economy, security, foreign policy, and international organizations. (WST: SS; IPG)

Capstone Seminar in Women’s Studies

Tace Hedrick
WST4935 – Section 4900
T 8-9, R 9; UST 108; 3 Credits

This course (required for all majors) is the culmination of the Women’s Studies major. It explores some examples of past and present scholarship to reaffirm the interdisciplinary nature of the field and to highlight the relationships among feminist theory, intellectual practice, and social change. The bulk of the semester is devoted to a full-length independent project on a topic of student’s own choosing. (Core for all tracks in major)

Internship (Undergraduate)

STAFF
WST 4940 – Section Departmentally Controlled; Credits 1-3

Prerequisite: Approval of the undergraduate coordinator. This course is designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. Click here for more information and an on-line application.

Practicum in Health Disparities

Laura Guyer
WST4941C- Section Departmentally Controlled; 3 Credits

WST 4941C is a capstone experience for seniors who have taken WST3930, Introduction to Health Disparities in Society. Students are matched with preceptors from community agencies working with under-served and disadvantaged populations. Students will learn about the agency and its organizational culture while applying concepts of cultural competence, linguistic appropriateness and health disparities. To register, contact Dr. Laura Guyer at lkguyer@ufl.edu.

Women’s/Gender Honors Thesis

STAFF
WST 4970 – Section Departmentally Controlled; 3 Credits

Students register for this course when pursuing an Honors Thesis in the WST major. In accordance with the protocols established by WST and the Honors Program, students design and pursue an independent research project with guidance from an advisor. Further information on the content and procedures for the thesis is available here; the application, which must be signed by the student, the advisor, and the other committee member(s) and submitted to the Undergraduate Coordinator by the last day of drop/add, is available here.

Anthropology of Pregnancy and Birth

Alyson G. Young
WST 4930 – Section 14D3
M 3-5; MAT 0002; 3 Credits

This course uses a biocultural life course approach to examine variability in health among mothers across the world. The class focuses on several aspects of maternal heath including reproductive ecology and determinants of fertility, maternal-fetal nutrition, birth experience and the political ecology of maternal health. Each of these topics has a long history, and could be covered in an individual course, but this class endeavors to provide a systematic overview and foundation for understanding issues associated with global maternal health and the anthropology of reproduction across the life course.

Fall 2012

NOTE: Letters in parenthesis indicate how the class fills a distribution requirement in the WST General Concentration and/or whether it counts for the TPS or IPG track in the major. If a course fills a GenEd requirement, that is specified separately.

Humanities Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality

Carolyn Kelley
WST 2611 – Section 0167
MWF 4; MAT 0016; 3 Credits

This course uses close readings of cultural representations (in literature, the visual arts, movies, television, the internet, etc) to understand intersecting categories of identity such as gender, sexuality, class, and race. We will examine how such categories operate in everything from novels to YouTube to the evening news. (WST: H; TPS; GenEd: H, D; Gordon Rule 2000)

Interdisciplinary Perspectives in Women’s Studies

Patricia A. Travis
WST 3015 – Section 04E6
T 11E2; MAT 0103; 3 Credits

Drawing on materials and methodologies from a variety of disciplines, this class explores the diverse experiences of women, both in past eras and in the present, in the U.S. and abroad. Required for the Women’s Studies major and minor; fulfills the General Education requirement in diversity. (Gen Ed: H, SS, D, Gordon Rule 4; WST: Core)

Ecofeminism

Amy Brown
WST 3349 – Section 1C65
MWF 3; TUR 2319; 3 Credits

Ecofeminism focuses on Western tradition’s naturalization of women and feminization of nature, drawing the conclusion that the domination of women and the domination of nature are intimately connected and mutually reinforcing. This hypothesized connection of women and nature oppressions gives rise to a common formative structure of “othering” shared by women, animals, nature, people of color and ethnically colonized groups. The course surveys ecofeminist theories, exploring the links between ecological values, principles, activism, and feminisms. Spiritual, philosophical, and activist perspectives are examined through interdisciplinary lens. Teamwork, field trips, and a joint class project are important components of the course. (SS, G&S, Gordon Rule 2)

Transnational Feminism

Anita Anantharam
WST 3415 – Section 1535
T 4, R 4-5; MAT 0016; 3 Credits

This course places women and feminism in a transnational perspective, focusing on various theories and movements engendered by women in contemporary national contexts. Development, reproductive politics, women’s health, etc., will be examined. (WST: Core; GenEd: S, N)

Sexualities Studies

Kendal Broad-Wright
WST 3603 – Section 0648
T 5-6, R 6; TUR L005; 3 Credits

This course provides an overview of the interdisciplinary study of sexualities, covering diverse approaches to the study of sexualities and desire (in literary studies, cultural studies, and social sciences) and attending to human sexuality as socially constructed and regulated. Attention will focuses on connections among sexualities and other social locators, such as race, ethnicity, gender, social class, age, and ability/disability. Some of the topics covered in the course will be sex education, Internet sex, LGBTQ expressions, sexual violence, and commercial sex, among others. (WST: SS; TPS Core)

Health Disparities in Society

Laura K. Guyer
WST 3930 – Section 07C2
MWF 2; TUR2319; 3 Credits

This introductory course examines the multifaceted issue of health disparities through the lens of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, disability, and special populations. It also addresses the concepts of medically underserved areas/populations, health literacy, cultural competence, readability & linguistic appropriateness and social determinants of health as they relate to health equity. (SS, G&S)

Women In Politics

Lynn H. Leverty
WST 3930 – Section 1C07
T 4, R 4-5; AND 0134; 3 Credits

(SS)

Women in Modern Hebrew Literature

Avraham Balaban
WST 3930 – Section 4926
T 5-6, R 6, TUR 2346, TUR2336; 3 Credits

This course examines different images of women as depicted in Hebrew literature throughout the 20th century. It starts with a close reading of stories by writers who established the new center of Hebrew literature in then-Palestine: S.Y. Agnon, Devora Baron. Then we study some stories of the “Palmach generation” (Moshe Shamir, Aharon Megged, Yigal Mossinson). A major part of the course is dedicated to the works of early ’60s “New Wave” writers: Amos Oz, A.B. Yehosua, Amalia Kahana-Carmon, and Aharon Appelfeld. We end with the new wave of female writers, who started publishing in the late 1980’s. No knowledge of Hebrew is required. (H; IPG)

Women and Politics in the Middle East

Patricia Woods
WST 3930 – Section 7789
MWF 3, AND 0101; 3 Credits

The course examines the women and gender in the politics of the late modern Middle East, from the late 19th century through the 1990s. The course addresses the use – by politicians, religious leaders, and others – of gendered norms and of women themselves in the construction of nationalism, the state, economic, social and religious norms. It also considers women’s responses to power holders, including some exposure to women’s movements in the Middle East. In this context, the course examines issues such as colonialism and nationalism; women and state development; religious law; feminists and religious conservatives; veiling; and women, society, and economy. The course includes attention to country cases such as Iran, Israel, Egypt, Turkey, and others. (SS, IPG)

Independent Study

Faculty
Variable Credits 1-3; Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 4905 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair

For advanced undergraduate students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research. Online Application.

Gender and Development in Africa

Renata Serra
WST 4930- 1833
T 7-8, R 7; MAT 0115; 3 Credits

Sociolinguistics of Gender and Language

Diana Boxer
WST 4930- Section 3176
T 7, R 7-8; AND 0019; 3 Credits

Have you ever wondered why people who say they are not sexist (or racist) nevertheless act in ways that are sexist (& racist)? Have you ever wondered why you feel excluded even when material is said to be inclusive? Have you ever wondered what it means for a language to be sexist? Have you ever wondered what language structure has to do with sexism (& racism)? This course will give you a guidebook around the sinkholes of English that sabotage even people of good will who ideologically, and ethically, would choose to be non_sexist (& non_racist). We will look, briefly, at some of the other ways in which other human beings have organized their interrelationships through grammars that incorporate other organizational principles. (H. SS; Gordon Rule 6)

Women and Islam

Zoharah Simmons
WST 4930- Section 5311
T 4, R 4-5; TUR 1315, TUR 2334; 3 Credits

This course brings a feminist insider perspective to the volatile subject of “Women and Islam.” Most non-Muslims see Islam as the root cause of the oppression of women in the Muslim world. However, a growing number of Muslim women scholars and activists have begun to challenge the notion that Islam is synonymous with the oppression of women. In this course we will review the history of the religion and women’s place in it, bringing to the foreground the significant role women played in Islam’s early history. We will also examine the situation of contermporary Muslim women from both the perspectives of Islamic Nationalists and Islamists. Both groups see women as a crucial component for the preservation of Islamic societies. (H; IPG)

Internship

Faculty
Variable Credits 1-3; Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 4940 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of undergraduate coordinator

Designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues.

Click here for more information and an on-line application.

Women’s/Gender Honors Thesis

Faculty
3 Credits; WST 4970- Section Department Controlled

Students register for this course when pursuing an Honors Thesis in the WST major. In accordance with the protocols established by WST and the Honors Program, students design and pursue an independent research project with guidance from an advisor. Guidelines for the Honors Thesis are available here and the Application for the Honors Thesis is here.

Summer 2012

Interdisciplinary Perspectives In Women’s Studies

Amy L. Brown
WST 3015 – Section 0343
(Summer A) MTWRF 3; AND 0013; 3 Credits

Drawing on materials and methodologies from a variety of disciplines, this class explores the diverse experiences of women, both in past eras and in the present, in the U.S. and abroad. Required for the Women’s Studies major and minor; fulfills the General Education requirement in diversity. (Gen Ed: H, SS, D; WST: Core)

Humanities Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality

Carolyn A. Kelle
WST 2611 – Section 4794
(Summer B) MTWRF 4; LIT 0113; 3 Credits

This course uses close readings of cultural representations (in literature, the visual arts, movies, television, the internet, etc) to understand intersecting categories of identity such as gender, sexuality, class, and race. We will examine how such categories operate in everything from novels to YouTube to the evening news. (Gen Ed: H, D; WST: H, TPS)

Social Science Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality

Mallory Szymanski
WST 2612 – Section 4797
(Summer B) MTWRF 5; TUR 2319; 3 Credits

This course considers the social contruction of gender, sexuality, race, class, and other identity categories. Readings focus on families and cultural groups mainly in the U.S. but with attention to other nations. Subjects as intimate as the body and violence and as pervasive as politics and the law are included. We emphasize differences in daily life experiences of health care, education, sports, and religion. Finally, we examine the potential of movements for social change. (Gen Ed: SS, D; WST: SS, TPS)

Independent Study (Undergraduate)

Staff
1-3 Credits, Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 4905 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair For advanced undergraduate students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research.Online application.

Internship (Undergraduate)

Staff
1-3 Credits, Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 4940 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair Designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. Click here for more information and an on-line application.

Spring 2012

NOTE: Letters in parenthesis indicate how the class fills a distribution requirement in the WST General Concentration and/or whether it counts for the TPS or GID track in the major. If a course fills a Gen Ed requirement, that is specified separately.

Humanities Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality

Kristin F. Allukian
WST 2611 – Section 0542
MWF 5; TUR L2319; 3 Credits

This course uses close readings of cultural representations (in literature, the visual arts, movies, television, the internet, etc) to understand intersecting categories of identity such as gender, sexuality, class, and race. We will examine how such categories operate in everything from novels to YouTube to the evening news. (Gen Ed: H, D, Gordon Rule 2; WST: H; TPS)

Interdisciplinary Perspectives in Women’s Studies

Emily Anne Casey
WST 3015 – Section 1358
MWF 3; TUR 1315; 3 Credits

Drawing on materials and methodologies from a variety of disciplines, this class explores the diverse experiences of women, both in past eras and in the present, in the U.S. and abroad. Required for the Women’s Studies major and minor; fulfills the General Education requirement in diversity. (Gen Ed: H, SS, D, Gordon Rule 4; WST: Core)

Women’s Poetry and 20th Century Culture

Marsha C. Bryant
WST 3930 – Section 05DG
MWF 3; Turlington 2322; 3 Credits

The course seeks to move discussions of women’s poetry beyond the impasse of canonical hierarchies by framing it within a larger cultural matrix–one which includes literary genres, modernism, musicology, archaeology, popular magazines, and performance. Women are positioned differently in culture than men, so feminist frameworks will remain crucial for our discussions. We will devote much class time to discussing individual poems, placing them in the contexts of the poet’s career and the larger culture she inhabits. In addition, we will hold roundtable discussions on your research papers (one on a women’s poetry anthology, one on a poet in light of a contemporaneous popular magazine). Finally, we will assess the powers and limits of the “women’s poetry” label. (H)

African Women Writers

Rose Sau Lugano
WST 3930 – Section 0655
T, 7-8, R, 7; MAT 0005, MAT 0011; 3 Credits

The course will enable students to explore African women writers and critics, look at their theoretical priorities, literary themes and cultural positions. It is designed to provide students with both a specific and a general view of the status, achievements and experiences of African women in fiction. Using different genres (novels and plays) we will endeavor to understand how women’s literary expression has been shaped by history, culture, and their experiences, as well as see how they are addressing issues of gender in their respective societies. Discussions will focus on issues of identity, oppression, resistance, exile, language, translation and colonialism, using as points of entry a diverse set of texts. Finally, students will examine how African women writers are using writing itself as a tool for social transformation and critique. (WST: H; IPG)

Black Feminist and Womanist Theory

Faye Harrison
WST 3930 – Section 1A77
T, 8-9, R, 9; MAT 0014, 3 Credits

Health Disparities in Society

Laura K. Guyer
WST 3930 – Section 08ED
MWF 2; AND 0134; 3 Credits

This introductory course examines the multifaceted issue of health disparities through the lens of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, disability, and special populations. It also addresses the concepts of medically underserved areas/populations, health literacy, cultural competence, readability & linguistic appropriateness and social determinants of health as they relate to health equity. (SS, G&S)

Reproductive Health in a Global Perspective

Sarah B. Cervone
WST 3930 – Section 1036
T 5-6, R 6; MAT 0016; 3 Credits

This course will approach reproductive health from a global perspective by examining how the human reproductive experience is shaped by globalization and development processes. Course materials will pay particular attention to the complex relationship between reproductive health and multi-scalar systems of inequality (global, local and household) in order to interrogate how broad structural forces (such as economics, politics, religion, race, and gender ideologies) can generate a variety of unique reproductive experiences among individuals living in the same locale. (SS/H, IPG, G&S, TPS)

Women in Hollywood: 1950 – Current

Carolyn Kelley
WST 3930 – Section 1591
MWF 4; TUR 2322; 3 Credits

This course examines the ways Hollywood cinema represents women by focusing on close readings of filmic texts (both discursive and formal elements) and blending these close readings with feminist theory/ feminist film theory in relation to the feminism versus post-feminism debate, “the chick flick,” the gaze, and the new Hollywood “Fempire.” We will also discuss types of women characters found in Hollywood films, such as “the working girl,” “the good wife/mother,” and” femme fatale.” Throughout the course, we will study how race, gender, sexual orientation, social class, and historical context intersect with Hollywood cinema. Films will include Alien (Ridley Scott, 1979), The Blue Gardenia (Fritz Lang, 1953), Body Heat (Lawrence Kasdan 1981), Bridesmaids (Paul Feig, 2011), The Children’s Hour (William Wyler 1961), Go Fish (Rose Troche 1994), Legally Blonde (Robert Luketic, 2001), Real Women Have Curves (Patricia Cardoso 2002), and Working Girl (Mike Nichols, 1988). Students who have not taken a prior film class will need to review an introductory film style guide/textbook before or during the semester. (H)

Gender and Food Politics

Anita Anantharam
WST 3930 – Section 1943
T 4, R 4-5; TUR 2319; 3 Credits

The past few years have been witness to a burgeoning of scholarship and literature on food. Hit-movies like Julie and Julia and best-selling fiction like Eat, Pray, Love, have brought into the American psyche the role and place of food in our lives. This class will focus on Gender and Transnational Food Politics on three continents: in Europe, North America, and South Asia. The course will provide a historical context for contemporary environmental and anti-globalization activism within the European Union, in the European colonial encounters in North Africa and Asia, and in modern-day nations of South and Southeast Asia and North America. This class will require a service learning component. (SS/H, IPG, service learning) Syllabus

Motherhood in Modern Hebrew Literature

Avraham, Balaban
WST 3930 – Section 5331
T 5-6, R 6; TUR 2333; 3 Credits

Israel was founded on expressed ideas of a complete equality between the sexes. Yet, until the last two decades of the twentieth century, Hebrew fiction was mainly a male domain, and women were rarely depicted as full blown human beings. In the last two decades a new wave of female writers started publishing their work, and the image of women has become much richer and more diverse. The rationale of the course is to explore the different manners women are depicted in Hebrew fiction throughout the twentieth century. Special attention is given to the changes that occurred in the last two decades, with the appearance of a new wave of female writers. NO HEBREW KNOWLEDGE IS REQUIRED. (GenEd: H, N; WST: H, IPG)

Independent Study (Undergraduate)

STAFF
WST 4905 – Section Departmentally Controlled; Credits: 1-3

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair

For advanced undergraduate students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research.Online application.

Early LGBT Literature

Jodi Schorb
WST 4930 – Section 05DH
T 7, R 7-8, TUR 1315; 3 Credits

Women Writing About Race

Debra Walker King
WST 4930 – Section 06HB
T 8-9; TUR 2322, R 9; TUR 2333; 3 Credits

African American Women and Cultural Critique

Debra Walker King
WST 4930 – Section 06HD
T 7; TUR 2336, R 7-8; TUR 2346; 3 Credits

Sociology of Gender (2 sections available)

Kendal L. Broad-Wright
WST 4930 – Section 4352
MWF, 5; NEB 0101; 3 Credits

Kendal L. Broad-Wright
WST 4930 – Section 5795
MWF, 4; FAB 0103; 3 Credits

The course is designed as an overview for undergraduates of the sociological examination of gender, primarily focusing on U.S. society and culture. Importantly, the sociology of gender complicates the idea that gender is simply “natural” or biologically determined. This course will examine the theoretical and empirical literature that allows such analyses. We will begin the course by examining the basic theories and premises of a “sociology of gender,” centering our analysis on how gender is culturally and socially constructed. Next, we will examine how our identities and important social institutions are defined by (and actually help to define) gender. We will then discuss the way our everyday interactions are also gendered. We will end the class with discussion about how, and if, such a gendered society can be degendered. (WST: SS)

Capstone Seminar in Women’s Studies

Tace Hedrick
WST4935 – Section 4900
T 8-9, R 9; TUR 2328; 3 Credits

This course (required for all majors) is the culmination of the Women’s Studies major. It explores some examples of past and present scholarship to reaffirm the interdisciplinary nature of the field and to highlight the relationships among feminist theory, intellectual practice, and social change. The bulk of the semester is devoted to a full-length independent project on a topic of student’s own choosing. (WST: Core)

Internship (Undergraduate)

STAFF
WST 4940 – Section Departmentally Controlled; Credits 1-3

Prerequisite: Approval of the undergraduate coordinator. This course is designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. Click here for more information and an on-line application.

Women’s/Gender Honors Thesis

STAFF
WST 4970 – Section Departmentally Controlled; 3 Credits

Students register for this course when pursuing an Honors Thesis in the WST major. In accordance with the protocols established by WST and the Honors Program, students design and pursue an independent research project with guidance from an advisor. Further information on the content and procedures for the thesis is available here; the application, which must be signed by the student, the advisor, and the other committee member(s) and submitted to the Undergraduate Coordinator by the last day of drop/add, is available here.

Fall 2011

NOTE: Letters in parenthesis indicate how the class fills a distribution requirement in the WST General Concentration and/or whether it counts for the TPS or IPG track in the major. If a course fills a GenEd requirement, that is specified separately.

Humanities Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality

Carolyn Kelley
WST 2611 – Section 0167
MWF 3; TUR 2319; 3 Credits

This course uses close readings of cultural representations (in literature, the visual arts, movies, television, the internet, etc) to understand intersecting categories of identity such as gender, sexuality, class, and race. We will examine how such categories operate in everything from novels to YouTube to the evening news. (WST: H; TPS; GenEd: H, D; Gordon Rule 2000)

Transnational Feminism

Anita Anantharam
WST 3415 – Section 1535
T 4, R 4-5; TUR AND 0034, AND 0101; 3 Credits

This course places women and feminism in a transnational perspective, focusing on various theories and movements engendered by women in contemporary national contexts. Development, reproductive politics, women’s health, etc., will be examined. (WST: Core; GenEd: S, N)

Sexualities Studies

Sarah Steele
WST 3603 – Section 0648
T 5-6, R 6; TUR L005, TUR L011; 3 Credits

This course provides an overview of the interdisciplinary study of sexualities, covering diverse approaches to the study of sexualities and desire (in literary studies, cultural studies, and social sciences) and attending to human sexuality as socially constructed and regulated. Attention will focuse on connections among sexualities and other social locators, such as race, ethnicity, gender, social class, age, and ability/disability. Some of the topics covered in the course will be sex education, Internet sex, LGBTQ expressions, sexual violence, and commercial sex, among others. (WST: SS; TPS Core)

History of Modern Masculinities

Louise Newman
WST 3930 – Section 07C2
T 5-6, R 6; FLI 105; 3 Credits

The course adopts a comparative historical approach to the study of masculinity, drawing from an interdisciplinary scholarship that has burgeoned in the last twenty-five years. Themes include manliness; nationalism and imperialism; racial ideologies; fatherhood; sports and bodies; and cultural representations.

Social and Cultural Dimensions of Women’s Well-Being

Taylor Locker
WST 3930 – Section 1214/HSC4950 – Section 037C
T 9, R 9-10; MAT 0018; 3 Credits

Overview of the forces that influence and help to define contemporary American psychological, physical, spiritual, and emotional wellness. Moving developmentally—starting with birth, ending with death—students will use ideas and theories drawn from psychology, sociology, public health, anthropology, medicine, and history to understand the way institutions (such as the family, schools, the workplace, the medical establishment, and the media) work to frame and define “health.” Using an intersectional approach, we will look not only at the way women’s experiences differ from men’s, but also at the ways socio-cultural forces such as sexism, racism, heterosexism and other forms of discrimination impact women’s experiences across the life-course. (WST: SS, G&S; GenEd: S, D)

Women in Modern Hebrew Literature

Avraham Balaban
WST 3930 – Section 4926
T 5-6, R 6, TUR 2333, TUR2336; 3 Credits

This course examines different images of women as depicted in Hebrew literature throughout the 20th century. It starts with a close reading of stories by writers who established the new center of Hebrew literature in then-Palestine: S.Y. Agnon, Devora Baron. Then we study some stories of the “Palmach generation” (Moshe Shamir, Aharon Megged, Yigal Mossinson). A major part of the course is dedicated to the works of early ’60s “New Wave” writers: Amos Oz, A.B. Yehosua, Amalia Kahana-Carmon, and Aharon Appelfeld. We end with the new wave of female writers, who started publishing in the late 1980’s. No knowledge of Hebrew is required. (H; IPG)

Turn of the Century America Women Writers

Stephanie Smith
WST 3930 – Section 7789
MWF 4, TUR 2336; 3 Credits

In America at the end of the nineteenth century, well-documented changes in daily life opened new horizons in both style and substance for women. A new word entered the American vocabulary at this time, originating in Bohemian Greenwich Village: “feminist.” People of this era, but especially young women, were restless. Women authors began to explore hitherto taboo choices or silenced miseries, and this period marked a flowering of women’s voices that had been, in the past, left out by most critical paradigms of American literature. This course will explore that flowering of American woman’s narrative from 1898 to 1929; authors will include Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Kate Chopin, Edith Wharton, Willa Cather, and Nella Larson, among others, along with critical arguments about the works we shall read. (H)

Women in Africa

Sharon A. Abramowitz
WST 4930- Section 012G
T 7, R 7-8; TUR 2333; 3 Credits

Women’s lives and women’s struggles worldwide open questions that strike at the very heart of who we are culturally, socially, and politically – questions of freedom, social obligation, social roles, and personal and political transformation. By studying the lives of African women in memoirs, narratives, film, and ethnographies, this seminar examines women’s lives and women’s struggles across Africa, and builds a comparative framework for considering the experience of women and families globally. With dialogues among Women and Gender Studies, Anthropology, and African Studies in mind, we will use a critical gaze to examine frameworks of international development, humanitarianism, and the African state. We will address women’s local experiences in political participation, urbanization, work and gender, familial roles, and health and illness; and consider controversial topics including genital excision, and conflict and displacement. (H/SS; IPG)

Feminist Theories of Women’s Writings: A Persuasive Perspective

Laurie Ellen Gries
WST 4930- Section 1833
T 4, R 4-5; TUR 2349; 3 Credits

How have women attempted to write and enact persuasion in the public sphere? What material conditions have silenced and controlled them? And what strategies have women used to overcome those obstacles and gain agency for themselves and their communities? In taking up such questions, this course engages with a wide range of feminist and rhetorical theories to study how women have both written and been written throughout history. We will read scholars and activists such as Judith Butler, Donna Haraway, Andrea Smith, Gloria Anzaldua, bell hooks, Chandra Mohanty, Elizabeth Grosz, and Vandana Shiva, who have been widely recognized for their feminist writing within the academy. However, we will also examine how women in other spheres around the globe have attempted to manipulate their space, bodies, speech, and a diverse range of materials to be heard by others. NOTE: If you took Feminist Theory w/Prof. Smith in Spring 2011 under its *English Dept. course number, Lit4554,* you must register for this class under the WST4930 number listed here or you will not be able to receive credit. (H)

Queer Theory

Kenneth Kidd
WST 4930- Section 3164
T 5-6, R 6; TUR 2350; 3 Credits

This course offers an introduction to major concerns, methodologies, and texts in queer theory, a field concerned with the construction and experience of gender, sex, and sexuality. We will work closely with foundational texts in the field and will also explore their usefulness in analyzing and engaging current issues such as trans-inclusion, “gay marriage,” and the organization of university curricula. (H; TPS Core)

Women and the Goddess

Caleb Simmons
WST 4930- Section 3176
M 5-6, W 6; AND 0019; 3 Credits

Women’s Studies student intending to register for this class should contact Ms. Tuckey in the CWSGR Office. (Gordon Rule: 6000; H)

Women and Islam

Zoharah Simmons
WST 4930- Section 5311
T 4; MAT 0010, R4-5; MAT 0118; 3 Credits

This course brings a feminist insider perspective to the volatile subject of “Women and Islam.” Most non-Muslims see Islam as the root cause of the oppression of women in the Muslim world. However, a growing number of Muslim women scholars and activists have begun to challenge the notion that Islam is synonymous with the oppression of women. In this course we will review the history of the religion and women’s place in it, bringing to the foreground the significant role women played in Islam’s early history. We will also examine the situation of contermporary Muslim women from both the perspectives of Islamic Nationalists and Islamists. Both groups see women as a crucial component for the preservation of Islamic societies. (H; IPG)

Willa Cather

Stephanie A. Smith
WST 4930- Section 7788
TMWF 6; TUR 2322; 3 Credits

In her lifetime, Willa Cather was the well-known editor of McClure’s Magazine, a poet, short-story writer and a novelist, but she is best-known today as a novelist. Indeed, Cather developed a theory of how and what a novel should do across her long career. This major author’s course will revisit Cather’s career as a novelist, examining both how any given individual novel “works” and what kind of narrative work it does, and also examine how Cather developed as a novelist over time. We will also situate Cather historically, as a writer of the early 20th century whose career was necessarily shaped by gender, race, class, geography, literary movements and forebears and, of course, history. (H)

Independent Study

Faculty
Variable Credits 1-3; Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 4905 – Section

Department Controlled Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair For advanced undergraduate students who desire to supplement their regular courses by independent reading or research. Online application.

Internship

Faculty
Variable Credits 1-3; Can be repeated up to 6 credits WST 4940 –Section

Department Controlled Prerequisite: Permission of undergraduate coordinator Designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. Click here for more information and an on-line application.

Women’s/Gender Studies Honors Thesis

Faculty
3 Credits; WST 4970- Section

Department Controlled Students register for this course when pursuing an Honors Thesis in the WST major. In accordance with the protocols established by WST and the Honors Program, students design and pursue an independent research project with guidance from an advisor. Further information is available here.

Summer 2011

Interdisciplinary Perspectives of Women

Amy L. Brown
WST 3015 – Section 0343 (Summer A)
MTWRF 3; AND 0013; 3 Credits

Drawing on materials and methodologies from a variety of disciplines, this class explores the diverse experiences of women, both in past eras and in the present, in the U.S. and abroad. Required for the Women’s Studies major and minor; fulfills the General Education requirement in diversity. (Gen Ed: H, SS, D; WST: Core)

Humanities Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality

Carolyn A. Kelley
WST 2611 – Section 4794 (Summer B)
MTWRF 4; LIT 0113; 3 Credits

This course uses close readings of cultural representations (in literature, the visual arts, movies, television, the internet, etc) to understand intersecting categories of identity such as gender, sexuality, class, and race. We will examine how such categories operate in everything from novels to YouTube to the evening news. (Gen Ed: H, D; WST: H, TPS)

Social Science Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality

Rose L. Moon
WST 2612 – Section 4797 Summer B;
MTWRF 5; TUR 2319; 3 Credits

This course considers the social contruction of gender, sexuality, race, class, and other identity categories. Readings focus on families and cultural groups mainly in the U.S. but with attention to other nations. Subjects as intimate as the body and violence and as pervasive as politics and the law are included. We emphasize differences in daily life experiences of health care, education, sports, and religion. Finally, we examine the potential of movements for social change. (Gen Ed: SS, D; WST: SS, TPS)

Independent Study (Undergraduate)

Staff
1-3 Credits, Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 4905 – Section

Department Controlled Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair For advanced undergraduate students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research. Online application.

Internship (Undergraduate)

Staff
1-3 Credits, Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 4940 – Section

Department Controlled Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair Designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. Click here for more information and an on-line application.

Spring 2011

NOTE: Letters in parenthesis indicate how the class fills a distribution requirement in the WST General Concentration and/or whether it counts for the TPS or GID track in the major. If a course fills a Gen Ed requirement, that is specified separately.

Humanities Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality

Carolyn A. Kelley
WST 2611 – Section 0542
MWF 6; TUR L011; 3 Credits

This course uses close readings of cultural representations (in literature, the visual arts, movies, television, the internet, etc) to understand intersecting categories of identity such as gender, sexuality, class, and race. We will examine how such categories operate in everything from novels to YouTube to the evening news. (Gen Ed: H, D, Gordon Rule 2; WST: H; TPS)

Interdisciplinary Perspectives in Women’s Studies

Tace Hedrick
WST 3015 – Section 1358
W 11-E2; TUR 1315; 3 Credits

Drawing on materials and methodologies from a variety of disciplines, this class explores the diverse experiences of women, both in past eras and in the present, in the U.S. and abroad. Required for the Women’s Studies major and minor; fulfills the General Education requirement in diversity. (Gen Ed: H, SS, D, Gordon Rule 4; WST: Core)

African Women Writers

Rose Sau Lugano
WST 3930 – Section 0655
T, R 7-8, 7; MAT 0005, MAT 0011; 3 Credits

The course will enable students to explore African women writers and critics, look at their theoretical priorities, literary themes and cultural positions. It is designed to provide students with both a specific and a general view of the status, achievements and experiences of African women in fiction. Using different genres (novels and plays) we will endeavor to understand how women’s literary expression has been shaped by history, culture, and their experiences, as well as see how they are addressing issues of gender in their respective societies. Discussions will focus on issues of identity, oppression, resistance, exile, language, translation and colonialism, using as points of entry a diverse set of texts. Finally, students will examine how African women writers are using writing itself as a tool for social transformation and critique. (WST: H; IPG)

Women’s Autobiographies

Renee Dowbnia
WST 3930 – Section 1036
R 10-E1; TUR 1315; 3 Credits

This course will cover women’s autobiographies from 1970s to the present, including works from African American, Latina, Native American, Caribbean American, Asian American, and Middle Eastern women. We will focus on the myriad ways women’s autobiographical texts address and problematize issues surrounding identity, subjectivity, agency, history, memory, sexuality, and resistance in their narratives. Due to the immense scope of the topic, we will pay particular attention to women’s autobiographies that experiment with genre and form, both as a means of self-expression and as way of grappling with the issues listed above. Why do women writers blur the lines between fact and fiction in their autobiographies? How do they weave together interviews, stories, images, quotes, articles, and other seemingly non-autobiographical formats in order to construct their identities and relate their experience to the reader? Genres covered will include social autobiography, bio-mythography, autobiographical manifestos, graphic memoirs, blogs as autobiography, and more. (WST: H)

Johnson and Sedgwick

Stephanie Ann Smith
WST 3930 – Section 1591
T,R 2-3, 3; TBA; 3 Credits

During the 1980’s and 90’s Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick and Barbara Johnson emerged as two voices that altered literary critical thinking. Sedgwick’s initial texts, Between Men and Epistemology of the Closetwere foundational for a new field: queer studies. Barbara Johnson incorporated a variety of perspectives into an interdisciplinary study as demonstrated in The Critical Difference and A World of Difference. As a scholar, teacher, and translator, Johnson helped make French philosopher Jacques Derrida accessible to the United States at a time when they had just begun to gain recognition in France. Deconstruction is, in Barbara Johnson’s phrase, “a careful teasing out of warring forces of signification within the text.” (WST: H; TPS)

Feminist Fiction

Tace Hedrick
WST 3930 – Section 1943
T 8-9, R 9; TUR 1315; 3 Credits

In this course, we will be reading some of the better-known United States feminist narratives written from 1973 to the early 2000s. We will be looking at historical context, genre, style, and other issues in order to think about what shaped the concerns of feminism, and how these concerns were expressed in narrative form. (WST: H)

Motherhood in Modern Hebrew Literature

Avraham, Balaban
WST 3930 – Section 5331
T 5-6, R 6; TUR 2346, TUR 2333; 3 Credits

Israel was founded on expressed ideas of a complete equality between the sexes. Yet, until the last two decades of the twentieth century, Hebrew fiction was mainly a male domain, and women were rarely depicted as full blown human beings. In the last two decades a new wave of female writers started publishing their work, and the image of women has become much richer and more diverse. The rationale of the course is to explore the different manners women are depicted in Hebrew fiction throughout the twentieth century. Special attention is given to the changes that occurred in the last two decades, with the appearance of a new wave of female writers. NO HEBREW KNOWLEDGE IS REQUIRED. (GenEd: H, N; WST: H, IPG)

Cultural Dimensions of Portuguese Globalism

Charles Andrew Perrone
WST 3930 – Section 6261
T 4-5; MAT 0102, R 4; MAT 0005; 3 Credits

This course examines the Western-most nation of Europe, Portugal, in the light of humanistic inquiries into questions of encounter, cultural conflict, expansion, colonialism, and globalization. Two major cultural themes in Lusitanian discourse will be examined: empire and integration. Through historically-situated forms of expressive culture, primarily literature, the class will follow a series of occurrences and themes. Throughout, materials to be used consider the national in relation to the international, European and global alike, as well as the condition of women and/or gender configurations, in a broad sense involving fictional point of view, female authorship, literal themes, figurative representations and mythical currents, relationships, patriarchal aspects, consciousness-raising, and political transformations. (Gen Ed: Gordon Rule 4; WST: H; IPG)

Independent Study (Undergraduate)

STAFF
WST 4905 – Section Departmentally Controlled;
Credits: 1-3

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair For advanced undergraduate students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research. Online application.

Feminist Theories

Stephanie Ann Smith
WST 4930 – Section 1599
T 5-6, R 6, TUR 2328; 3 Credits

In 1921, after decades of activism, women in the United States were granted full suffrage, and become voting citizens, with a political voice. But that achievement took considerable time and the effort of several generations of American women. This course will take us back through the history of female political agitation in this country, beginning with the “first wave” of abolitionists and suffragettes, starting with Margaret Fuller’s argument for female equality in Woman in the Nineteenth Century and the Seneca Falls meeting of 1848 through the 19thAmendment to the Constitution ratified in 1920. We will then move to the “second wave” of feminism, that arguably began with the publication of Betty Friedan’s The Feminine Mystique in 1962 and is still alive in the political arena today, although some question whether or not there has been, since the 1970’s, a “third wave.” This course will cover a broad range of feminist theories, from literary and cultural theory to political, social and scientific inquiry, while providing a historical look at feminism and womanism in the United States. (WST: H)

History of Sexualities

Ben Wise
WST 4930 – Section 4352
T 7; LIT 0219, R 7-8; FLI 0111; 3 Credits

This course explores the social history of sexuality, tracing history of ideas about and attitudes toward sexuality in law, politics, medicine and science from ancient Greeks to the present, with an emphasis on the North American experience.

Gender and Language

Diana Boxer
WST 4930 – Section 5795
T 4; AND 0013, R 4-5; AND 0013; 3 Credits

This course offers the student an opportunity to study how language is used by women and men and about women and men in the various domains of interaction (e.g. social, family, workplace) to create and sustain status and power in society. It offers the chance to: Study how sex and sexism are realized through language, investigate the myths about language and woman’s place, learn how gender and politeness interact, ponder how women are derogated in language, reflect on the repercussions of the generic masculine in grammar, study how female-male miscommunication arises, come to terms with gendered language and power in society, including the language of sexual harassment, learn how girls and boys are linguistically socialized in gendered ways, ponder the question of difference vs. dominance. (GenEd: S, D; WST: H, SS)

Capstone Seminar in Women’s Studies

Stephanie Evans
WST 4935 – Section 4900
T 4, R 4-5; UST 108; 3 Credits

This course (required for all majors) is the culmination of the Women’s Studies major. It explores some examples of past and present scholarship to reaffirm the interdisciplinary nature of the field and to highlight the relationships among feminist theory, intellectual practice, and social change. The bulk of the semester is devoted to a full-length independent project on a topic of student’s own choosing. (WST: Core)

Internship (Undergraduate)

STAFF
WST 4940 – Section Departmentally Controlled;
Credits 1-3

Prerequisite: Approval of the undergraduate coordinator. This course is designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. Click here for more information and an on-line application.

Women’s/Gender Honors Thesis

STAFF
WST 4970 – Section Departmentally Controlled;
3 Credits

Students register for this course when pursuing an Honors Thesis in the WST major. In accordance with the protocols established by WST and the Honors Program, students design and pursue an independent research project with guidance from an advisor. Further information on the content and procedures for the thesis is available here; the application, which must be signed by the student, the advisor, and the other committee member(s) and submitted to the Undergraduate Coordinator by the last day of drop/add, is available here.

Fall 2010

NOTE: Letters in parenthesis indicate how the class fills a distribution requirement in the WST General Concentration and/or whether it counts for the TPS or IPG track in the major. If a course fills a GenEd requirement, that is specified separately.

Interdisciplinary Perspectives in Women’s Studies

Trysh Travis
WST 3015 – Section 0853
R 11-E2 ; MAT 103; 3 Credits

Drawing on materials and methodologies from a variety of disciplines, this class explores the diverse experiences of women, both in past eras and in the present, in the U.S. and abroad. Required for the Women’s Studies major and minor; fulfills the General Education requirement in diversity. (WST: Core; Gen Ed: H, SS, D)

Transnational Feminism

Anita Anantharam
WST 3415 – Section 1535
T 5-6, R 6; TUR 2336; 3 Credits

This course places women and feminism in a transnational perspective, focusing on various theories and movements engendered by women in contemporary national contexts. Development, reproductive politics, women’s health, etc., will be examined. (WST: Core; Gen Ed: S, N)

Women of Color in US

Stephanie Evans
WST 3930 – Section 1205
W 8-10; AND 0034; 3 Credits

This course is designed to provide an overview of the intersection of race, ethnicity, sex, and gender presence, oppression, and creative resistance in the historical and contemporary experience of Native American, Asian American, African American, and Latina women. The course seeks to enhance understanding of how racism and sexism function in the political, social, and economic systems of the U.S. Women of color in the U.S. have formed communities of resistance that will be explored in their writings. (H/SS)

Race & Gender US History

Louise Newman
WST 3930 – Section 2536
MWF 6; FLI 105; 3 Credits

Drawing on memoir and biography, this course examines historical and cultural perspectives on gender, sexuality, race and class in the Modern United States (1945-present). We will spend the first few weeks exploring key issues in the intersecting histories of gender and Cold War politics from the late 1940s through the early 1960s. Then we will move to the 1960s and 1970s to examine the “sexual revolution” in the context of civil rights, the New Left, and the women’s liberation movement. In the final weeks of the course, we will explore both the consolidation and retrenchment that characterizes gender politics from the 1980s through the millennium.

Sexualities Studies

Kendal Broad-Wright
WST 3930 – Section 4127
T 5-6; R 6; MAT 0016; 3 Credits

This is a course which will provide an overview of the interdisciplinary study of sexualities. It will cover diverse approaches to the study of sexualities and desire (in literary studies, cultural studies, and social sciences) and pay attention to human sexuality as socially constructed and regulated behaviors. Central to class will be attention to connections between sexualities and other social locators, such as race, ethnicity, gender, social class, age, and ability/disability. Some of the topics covered in the course will be sex education, Internet sex, LGBTQ expressions, sexual violence, and commercial sex, among others. This course serves as the core course for the minor in Theories and Politics of Sexuality in the Center for Women’s Studies and Gender Research. (SS; TPS)

Women in Modern Hebrew Literature

Avraham Balaban
WST 3930 – Section 3265
T 5-6, R 6, LIT 125; 3 Credits

This course examines the different images of women as depicted in Hebrew literature throughout the twentieth century. It starts with a close reading of stories by writers who established the new center of Hebrew literature in then-Palestine: S.Y. Agnon, Devora Baron. Then we study some stories of the “Palmach generation” (Moshe Shamir, Aharon Megged, Yigal Mossinson). A major part of the course is dedicated to the works of the “New Wave” writers of the early 1960’s, Amos Oz, A.B. Yehosua, Amalia Kahana-Carmon, and Aharon Appelfeld. The final part of the course deals with the new wave of female writers, who started publishing in the late 1980’s. No knowledge of Hebrew is required. (H; IPG)

Feminism: Women’s Popular Genres

Tace Hedick
WST 3930 – Section 5321
T 5-6, R6, TUR 2305; 3 Credits

In this course, we will be reading across popular genres aimed at women – mystery, romance, paranormal romance, street novels – in order to look at the ways feminist ideas have, or have not, made their appearance in the arena of popular literary culture. We will be reading critical feminist writing as well. (H)

Rethinking Globalization

Anita Anatharam
WST 4930- Section 2424
T 8-10; FLG 0285; 3 Credits

Globalization is one of those buzzwords that has been debated and scrutinized heavily in recent years. The term has been used to designate a wide variety of practices from the movement of goods and capital, to the migration of people across national boundaries, to an imposed standardization of lifestyles. This class focuses on readings that are critical of the uneven effects of globalization and neoliberal global political economies. We will consider a variety of analytical and theoretical frameworks with the intention of developing nuanced approaches to today’s transnational political economies that are sensitive to gender issues, local and communal practices, and politics of representation. (SS; IPG)

Women Writers in Algeria

Brigitte Weltman-Aron
WST 4930- Section 2961
M 9, W 9-10; TUR 2342; 3 Credits

This course will focus on a sample of texts of fiction written in French by Algerian women or women born in Algeria, since French colonization up to our time. Through film excerpts and critical essays, we will analyze how women write themselves in Algeria, and the linguistic, political, religious and social issues they raise in their writings. This course is taught in French. (H; IPG)

Desire and Dread: American Literature and Sexuality to 1900

Jodi Schorb
WST 4930- Section 5311
T 4, R 4-5; TUR 2328; 3 Credits

Concerns over how individuals and specific populations “use” their sexuality (women, bachelors, the poor, slaves…) infuse American history and provide a rich thematic approach the study of early American literatures. Sexual discourses influence national debates around morality, the role of the family, violence and rape, slavery, temperance and thrift, the public role of virtue, the responsibilities of a “rising generation,” and the potency of American economic, military and maritime power. Writers like Herman Melville, Harriet Jacobs, Walt Whitman, and Henry James reflect the sexual mores of their time, but such artists do more than mirror cultural norms: they intervene, challenge prevailing attitudes, and proliferate new sexual discourses and desires. (H)

Independent Study

Faculty
Variable Credits 1-3; Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 4905 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair For advanced undergraduate students who desire to supplement their regular courses by independent reading or research. Online application.

Internship

Faculty
Variable Credits 1-3;Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 4940 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of undergraduate coordinator Designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. Click here for more information and an on-line application.

Women’s/Gender Studies Honors Thesis

Faculty
3 Credits; WST 4970- Section Department Controlled

Students register for this course when pursuing an Honors Thesis in the WST major. In accordance with the protocols established by WST and the Honors Program, students design and pursue an independent research project with guidance from an advisor. Further information is available here.

Summer 2010

Interdisciplinary Perspectives of Women

Staff
WST 3015 – Section 0343 (Summer A)
MTWRF 3; TUR 1315; 3 Credits

Drawing on materials and methodologies from a variety of disciplines, this class explores the diverse experiences of women, both in past eras and in the present, in the U.S. and abroad. Required for the Women’s Studies major and minor; fulfills the General Education requirement in diversity. (Gen Ed: H, SS, D; WST: Core)

Humanaities Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality

Staff
WST 2611 – Section 4794 (Summer B)
MTWRF 4; TUR 2334; 3 Credits

This course uses close readings of cultural representations (in literature, the visual arts, movies, television, the internet, etc) to understand intersecting categories of identity such as gender, sexuality, class, and race. We will examine how such categories operate in everything from novels to YouTube to the evening news. (Gen Ed: H, D; WST: H, TPS)

Social Science Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality

Staff
WST 2612 – Section 4797 Summer B;
MTWRF 5; TUR 2334; 3 Credits

This course considers the social contruction of gender, sexuality, race, class, and other identity categories. Readings focus on families and cultural groups mainly in the U.S. but with attention to other nations. Subjects as intimate as the body and violence and as pervasive as politics and the law are included. We emphasize differences in daily life experiences of health care, education, sports, and religion. Finally, we examine the potential of movements for social change. (Gen Ed: SS, D; WST: SS, TPS)

Independent Study (Undergraduate)

Staff
1-3 Credits, Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 4905 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair For advanced undergraduate students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research. Online application.

Internship (Undergraduate)

Staff
1-3 Credits, Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 4940 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair Designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. Click here for more information and an on-line application.

Spring 2010

NOTE: Letters in parenthesis indicate how the class fills a distribution requirement in the WST General Concentration and/or whether it counts for the TPS or GID track in the major. If a course fills a Gen Ed requirement, that is specified separately.

Interdisciplinary Perspectives in Women’s Studies

Trysh Travis
WST 3015 – Section 1358
MWF 3; TUR 2322; 3 Credits

Drawing on materials and methodologies from a variety of disciplines, this class explores the diverse experiences of women, both in past eras and in the present, in the U.S. and abroad. Required for the Women’s Studies major and minor; fulfills the General Education requirement in diversity. (Gen Ed: H, SS, D; WST: Core)

Transnational Feminism

Florence Babb
WST 3415 – Section 1956
MWF 5; TUR 2333; 3 Credits

This course, required for the Women’s Studies major places women and feminism in a transnational perspective, focusing on various theories and movements engendered by women in contemporary national contexts. Development, reproductive politics, women’s health, etc., will be examined. (Gen Ed: S, N; WST: Core)

Gender, Drink & Disorder in American Culture

Trysh Travis
WST 3930 – Section 0472
MWF 6; TUR 2336; 3 Credits

This class examines the evolution of drinking in the United States from the 19thcentury to the present, focusing on the ways in which ideas—and ideals—of gender have shaped the desire to drink, the urge to control drinking, and our definitions of “drunkenness” and “sobriety.” Situating American drinking habits within the rise of industrial capitalism and changing patterns of consumption, leisure, and home life, we will first examine the growth of idealized images of masculinity and femininity in the nineteenth century, with attention to the ways in which both public drunkenness and temperance advocacy relied on those images. The course’s second half treats drinking in the twentieth century, looking at the growing acceptance of women’s drinking and alcohol consumption within the home, as well as at the rise of the idea of excessive drinking as a “disease” rather than a moral failing. The class concludes with a look at the way gender and sexuality, as well as race and class, play out in campus alcohol culture. (WST: H, SS)

Women’s Autobiographies

Amanda Davis
WST 3930 – Section 1036
M 7-9; MCCA 2196; 3 Credits

This class will focus on a number of remarkable autobiographies by female authors, with a special focus on women’s memoirs of activism and their accounts of living on various borders. We will read narratives of imprisonment, reservation life, and ongoing struggles for justice (and that is just to get us started). Contemporary texts by women of color will be placed at the center of study, with close examination of how these authors explore and problematize issues surrounding subjectivity, power, identity, and resistance. We will address such topics as why so many women have utilized autobiography to respond to key social and political events, as well as how these texts contribute to women’s intellectual and activist history. (WST: H)

Women of Color in the U.S.

Stephanie Evans
WST 3930 – Section 1390
T 6, R 6-7; LIT 0205; 3 Credits

This course is designed to provide an overview of the intersection of race, ethnicity, sex, and gender presence, oppression, and creative resistance in the historical and contemporary experience of Native American, Asian American, African American, and Latina women. The course seeks to enhance understanding of how racism and sexism function in the political, social, and economic systems of the U.S. Women of color in the U.S. have formedcommunities of resistance that will be explored in their writings. (WST: H/SS)

Feminist Fictions

Tace Hedrick
WST 3930 – Section 1943
T 4, R 4-5; TUR 2346; 3 Credits

In this course, we will be reading fiction central to feminist movement from the 1970s to 2010. We will be examining how feminist concerns change over the last 40 years, narrative and genre strategies used by feminist writers, and how the definition of “feminist fiction” might have changed or stayed the same over these decades. (WST: H)

Gender and Nature

Whitney Sanford
WST 3930 – Section 4929
T 5-6: TUR 233; R 6: TUR 2336; 3 Credits

Between 1350 and 1650 the understanding of human identity, or “human nature,” underwent substantial changes within both the circles of the intellectual elite and in the broader culture. Gender identity, a key component of the conception of human nature, was re-examined as well. The reconsideration of gender, however, did not apply the new Renaissance emphasis on human dignity, creativity and autonomy equally to men and women, and western society has inherited often confusing and even contradictory interpretations of human nature and gender. Though our present rhetoric seldom presents it in this manner, many of our current presuppositions about gender, as well as the basic challenges to those assumptions, have their origin in the turbulent clash of ideas of the early modern period. This course will explore the changing views of human nature and gender during this critical time period and give students the opportunity to investigate key topics. (WST: H)

Motherhood in Modern Hebrew Literature

Avraham, Balaban
WST 3930 – Section 5331
T 5: TUR 2306; R 4-5: TUR 2328; 3 Credits

Israel was founded on expressed ideas of a complete equality between the sexes. Yet, until the last two decades of the twentieth century, Hebrew fiction was mainly a male domain, and women were rarely depicted as full blown human beings. In the last two decades a new wave of female writers started publishing their work, and the image of women has become much richer and more diverse. The rationale of the course is to explore the different manners women are depicted in Hebrew fiction throughout the twentieth century. Special attention is given to the changes that occurred in the last two decades, with the appearance of a new wave of female writers. NO HEBREW KNOWLEDGE IS REQUIRED. (WST: H; GenEd: H, N)

Women in the “Other Europe”

Eva Wampuszyc
WST 3930 – Section 6261 (Honors)
MWF 5; TUR 2319; 3 Credits

The study of women and the debate regarding women’s rights in East-Central Europe is particularly important for the new member states of the European Union as the EU develops ways for building a common European identity. While these new countries have successfully carried out economic, institutional, and political reforms, deeply rooted cultural biases related to gender roles and identities often remain unresolved and cause a gap in the cultural understanding between “East” and “West.” By studying the representation of women in film and literature in an interdisciplinary theoretical and historical context, this course will provide students with a unique opportunity to interrogate Western ideas of feminism.

Sociology of Gender

Kendal Broad-Wright
WST 3930 – Section 7220
T 4; R 4-5; CLB C130; 3 Credits

The course is designed as an overview for undergraduates of the sociological examination of gender, primarily focusing on U.S. society and culture. Importantly, the sociology of gender complicates the idea that gender is simply “natural” or biologically determined. This course will examine the theoretical and empirical literature that allows such analyses. We will begin the course by examining the basic theories and premises of a “sociology of gender,” centering our analysis on how gender is culturally and socially constructed. Next, we will examine how our identities and important social institutions are defined by (and actually help to define) gender. We will then discuss the way our everyday interactions are also gendered. We will end the class with discussion about how, and if, such a gendered society can be degendered. (WST: SS)

African Women Writers

Faye Harrison
WST 3930 – Section 7466
T 7-8: TUR 2305; R 7: TUR 2306; 3 Credits

The course will enable students to explore African women writers and critics, look at their theoretical priorities, literary themes and cultural positions. It is designed to provide students with both a specific and a general view of the status, achievements and experiences of African women in fiction. Using different genres (novels and plays) we will endeavor to understand how women’s literary expression has been shaped by history, culture, and their experiences, as well as see how they are addressing issues of gender in their respective societies. Discussions will focus on issues of identity, oppression, resistance, exile, language, translation and colonialism, using as points of entry a diverse set of texts. Finally, students will examine how African women writers are using writing itself as a tool for social transformation and critique. (H)

American Literature & Sexuality to 1900

Jodi Rene Schorb
WST 4930 – Section 5359
T 9-11; TUR 2346; 3 Credits

This course considers how knowledge about early American sexuality and sexual history can enrich our understanding of earlier American literature. After a theoretical introduction that explains how sexual knowledge is created and shaped through literature, the course moves through three main periods – early republic, antebellum, and early modern (marked by the rise of “sexology”) – analyzing a diverse range of genres (sermon, seduction novel, travel narrative, detective fiction, slave narrative, gothic fiction). Discussion will emphasize how American sexual history influences the form, structure, themes, and reception of our chosen texts. (WST: H)

Women In Film

Maureen Cheryn Turim
WST 4930 – Section 8445
T 4, R 4-5, T E1E; TUR 2322; 4 Credits

This course will examine how women have been represented in film, how they have participated in film production, and how they consume film images. We will look at various feminist approaches and the range of debates as to how to address these issues. The course will have several goals; to introduce you to the history of women in film, to increase your skills in reading film, in reading critical writing about film, and in understanding the relation between writing critical analysis and feminist theory. Emphasis will be on such basic issues as viewer identification and cultural context as currently formulated through various feminist and post-structuralist methodologies. We will explore how feminism intersects with psychoanalysis, ideology, deconstruction and related approaches. We will examine the conjuncture of theoretical issues with an experience of specific texts, and the function of these texts in the past and present workings of history. (WST: H)

Honors in Paris: An Appetite for Paris: Gender, Gloablization and Food (Study Abroad)

Anita Anantharam
WST 4956 – Section Departmentally Controlled

If there is one thing that is both culturally specific and truly open to global experience at the same time, it is food. Food is not just a basic necessity to sustain life, but also the one thing that all humans and animals have in common: you need to eat to survive. Yet each culture’s attitudes towards food preparation and consumption tells us a great deal about that society’s socio-political organization and structure. Because foodways (the cultural, social and economic practices relating to production and consumption of food) transcend geographic boundaries, the politics of what we eat, where we eat it, and how we eat reflect deep-rooted gender, religious, racial, class, and national biases. By examining foodways historically, we can see how these issues have developed over time and across cultures in relation to political, social and economic changes. (WST: H, SS)

Identity, Politics, Education and Culture: African Americans in Paris (Study Abroad, Spring Break 2010, March 7-13)

Stephanie Evans
WST 4956 – Section Departmentally Controlled

This course will explore the African American presence in Paris. Since the mid-1700s scores of African Americans have visited, lived, and worked in France. Students will research the experiences and perceptions of Black Americans and study why and how a sustained pattern of visitation has occurred. Significant attention will be paid to how gender and sexuality were woven into Black experiences and interpretations of Black Parisian life.

Independent Study (Undergraduate)

STAFF
WST 4905 – Section Departmentally Controlled; Credits: 1-3

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair For advanced undergraduate students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research. Online application.

Internship (Undergraduate)

STAFF
WST 4940 – Section Departmentally Controlled; Credits 1-3

Prerequisite: Approval of the undergraduate coordinator. This course is designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. Click here for more information and an on-line application.

Women’s/Gender Honors Thesis

STAFF
WST 4970 – Section Departmentally Controlled; 3 Credits

Students register for this course when pursuing an Honors Thesis in the WST major. In accordance with the protocols established by WST and the Honors Program, students design and pursue an independent research project with guidance from an advisor. Further information is available here.

Fall 2009

NOTE: Letters in parenthesis indicate how the class fills a distribution requirement in the WST General Concentration and/or whether it counts for the TPS or GID track in the major. If a course fills a Gen Ed requirement, that is specified separately.

Interdisciplinary Perspectives in Women’s Studies

Amanda Davis, Anita Anantharam
WST 3015 – Section 0853, WST 3015 – Section 1579 (Gordon Rule 4)
T 3, R 3-4; TUR 2333; 3 Credits M 8-10; TUR 1315; 3 Credits

The life experiences of women through the study of materials in the humanities, social and natural sciences and in the health professions. This is a required course for the Women’s Studies major and minor and it fulfills the general education requirement in diversity. It can also be taken as an elective. (Gen Ed: H, S, D; WST: Core)

Transnational Feminisms

Anita Anantharam
WST 3415 – Section 1535
T 5, R 5-6; MAT 108; 3 Credits

This course places women and feminism in a transnational perspective, focusing on various theories and movements engendered by women in contemporary national contexts. Development, reproductive politics, women’s health, etc., will be examined. (Gen Ed: S, N; WST: Core)

Gender, Travel and Tourism

Florence Babb
WST 3930 – Section 2535
T, 7 R7-8; TUR 1315; 3 Credits

This course considers how gender, global travel, and tourism come together in the contemporary world. We will examine gender differences (as well as differences of race, class, sexual orientation, national origin) in the experiences of travelers as well as of those who work in the service industries that accommodate travelers’ needs. We will also examine the gendered and racialized ways in which travel destinations are represented and marketed. Among the questions we will ask are the following: How are “exotic” locations portrayed as feminine? How are men and women treated differently as they participate in transnational currents of tourism? When and where are gender and sexual identities commodified through tourism? How are power relations negotiated and what prospects are there for communities of women and men in the Global south to actively construct the terms of their engagement with travelers from the Global north? (WST: H)

Women and Poverty

Amanda Davis
WST 3930 – Section 2550
R 10-E1; Pugh 120; 3 Credits

Over 37 million people in the U.S. were in poverty in 2007 alone, with many increasingly vulnerable to living below poverty thresholds given current economic conditions. This course will examine some of the varied effects of poverty on women and children in the wake of recent social, political and programming shifts, as well as how poverty intersects with other systems of inequality like racism and sexism. Three core segments will constitute the majority of the material covered: women’s low-wage work and their status in the labor market following the 1996 welfare reforms; the effects of globalization and the growth of low-pay positions on immigrant women working in a transnational economy; and literary examinations of poverty, identity, race, and community in such remarkable texts as The Women of Brewster Place and The Third Life of Grange Copeland. (WST: H/SS)

Sexualities Studies

Kendal Broad-Wright
WST 3930 – Section 4127
M,W,F 8 ; LIT 0113; 3 Credits

This is a course which will provide an overview of the interdisciplinary study of sexualities. It will cover diverse approaches to the study of sexualities and desire (in literary studies, cultural studies, and social sciences) and pay attention to human sexuality as socially constructed and regulated behaviors. Central to class will be attention to connections between sexualities and other social locators, such as race, ethnicity, gender, social class, age, and ability/disability. Some of the topics covered in the course will be sex education, Internet sex, LGBTQ expressions, sexual violence, and commercial sex, among others. This course serves as the core course for the minor in Theories and Politics of Sexuality in the Center for Women’s Studies and Gender Research.

Women and Men in Contempory Culture

Milagros Peña
WST 3930 – Section 4127
MWF, 6; FLG0260; 3 Credits

This course considers the social construction of gender, sexuality, race, class, and other identity categories. Readings focus on individuals, families, and cultural groups, mainly in the U.S. but with attention to other nations. Subjects as intimate as the body and violence and as pervasive as politics and the law are included. We emphasize differences in daily life experiences of health care, education, sports, and religion. Finally, we examine the potential of movements for social change.

Independent Study

Faculty
Variable Credits 1-3
WST 4905 – Section Department Controlled
Can be repeated up to 6 credits

For advanced undergraduate students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research. Online application. (WST: H/SS)

Women in Modern Hebrew Literature

Avraham Balaban
WST 3930 – Section 3265
T 5, R4-5, AND 0134, CSE E119; 3 Credits

This course examines the different images of women as depicted in Hebrew literature throughout the twentieth century. It starts with a close reading of stories by writers who established the new center of Hebrew literature in then-Palestine: S.Y. Agnon, Devora Baron. Then we study some stories of the “Palmach generation” (Moshe Shamir, Aharon Megged, Yigal Mossinson). A major part of the course is dedicated to the works of the “New Wave” writers of the early 1960’s, Amos Oz, A.B. Yehosua, Amalia Kahana-Carmon, and Aharon Appelfeld. The final part of the course deals with the new wave of female writers, who started publishing in the late 1980’s. No knowledge of Hebrew is required.

Capstone Seminar

Stephanie Evans
WST 4935- Section 1537
T 3, R 3-4; Ustler 108

This course (required for all majors) is the culmination of the Women’s Studies major. It explores some examples of past and present scholarship to reaffirm the interdisciplinary nature of the field and to highlight the relationships among feminist theory, intellectual practice, and social change. The bulk of the semester is devoted to a full-length independent project on a topic of student’s own choosing.

Internship

Faculty
WST 4940 – Section Department Controlled
Can be repeated up to 6 credits

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair This course is designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. Online Application.

Women’s/Gender Studies Honors Thesis

Faculty
WST 4970- Section department controlled
3 Credits

Students register for this course when pursuing an Honors Thesis in the WST major. In accordance with the protocols established by WST and the Honors Program, students design and pursue an independent research project with guidance from an advisor.

Summer 2009

Interdisciplinary Perspectives of Women

Amanda Davis
WST 3015 – Section 0343 (Summer A)
MTWRF 2; TUR 2336; 3 Credits

The life experiences of women through the study of materials in the humanities, social and natural sciences and in the health professions. This is a required course for the Women’s Studies major and minor and it fulfills the general education requirement in diversity. It can also be taken as an elective. (Gen Ed: H, S, D; WST: Core)

Interdisciplinary Perspectives of Women

Tim Fogarty
WST 3015 – Section 4301 (Summer B)
MTWRF 2; TUR 2322; 3 Credits

The life experiences of women through the study of materials in the humanities, social and natural sciences and in the health professions. This is a required course for the Women’s Studies major and minor and it fulfills the general education requirement in diversity. It can also be taken as an elective. (Gen Ed: H, S, D; WST: Core)

Incarcerated Women

Amanda Davis
WST 3430 – Section 4520 Summer B;
MTWRF 3; TUR 2333; 3 Credits

Nearly one million women are currently under some form of correctional supervision in the United States, the majority of whom are women of color. Women now represent the fastest growing population group entering America’s prisons (a seven fold increase since 1980 alone), even though most continue to be incarcerated for non-violent offenses. The use of detention, pretrial incarceration, and imprisonment has risen dramatically in many regions of the country for juvenile girls as well, with gender overlapping with race and class in especially punitive ways for young African American and Latina girls in particular. This class will discuss some of the contemporary shifts that have occurred within the last twenty years in our use of prisons as a response to crime and its perceived threat, and the effects these changes have had on the surge of women being imprisoned today. It will also draw attention to a number of autobiographical texts written by incarcerated women in the United States, a remarkable body of literature that encourages us to think persistently and progressively about many of our most complex social issues—poverty, racism, abuse and gender inequalities among them.

Internship

Staff
1-3 Credits, Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 4940 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair This course is designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. An application can be found athttp://www.wst.ufl.edu/Internships.htm.

UF in India: Rethinking Globalization: Gender, Communities, Representation

Study Abroad Summer 2009 Location: Navdanya Farm, Dehra Dun, India
WST 4956, Sec 0235. 3 credits (SS/H; GID) WST 6957 SEC 0239, 3 credits

Course Highlights:•Live in an organic farm community•Daily yoga instruction •Dormitory housing (double occupancy)•3 locally grown, organic meals/day included •Excursions to nearby pilgrimage sites •Workshops on indigenous plants and traditional medicine •Trekking in the Himalayan foothills Instructors: Anita Anantharam (UF Women’s Studies), Travis L. Smith (UF Religion) Visiting Instructors: Vandana Shiva (Navdanya), John Campbell (Columbia University), and Pavlos Georgiadis (University ofHohenheim)

Internship

Staff
1-3 Credits, Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 6946 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair This course is designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. An application can be found at http://www.wst.ufl.edu/Internships.htm.

Spring 2009

NOTE: Letters in parenthesis indicate how the class fills a distribution requirement in the WST General Concentration and/or whether it counts for the TPS or GID track in the major. If a course fills a Gen Ed requirement, that is specified separately.

Interdisciplinary Perspectives in Women’s Studies

Tace Hedrick
WST 3015 – Section 1358,
MWF 4; TUR 1315

Amanda Davis
WST 3015 – Section 6895
T 9 and R 9-10; TUR 2306

Trysh Travis
WST 3015 – Section 4454
M 11-E2; MAT 0119 (Gordon Rule 4000)
3 Credits

Drawing on materials and methodologies from a variety of disciplines, this class explores the diverse experiences of women, both in past eras and in the present, in the U.S. and abroad. Required for the Women’s Studies major and minor; fulfills the General Education requirement in international studies and diversity. (Gen Ed H, SS, D)

Transnational Feminism

Anita Anantharam
WST 3415– Section 5401
T 2-3 and R 3; Lit 207, Weim 1094; 3 Credits T

his course places women and feminism in a transnational perspective, focusing on various theories and movements engendered by women in contemporary national contexts. Development, reproductive politics, women’s health, etc., will be examined. (Gen Ed H, SS, N)

U.S. Latina/Chicana Literature and Culture

WST 3930 – Section 0472
MWF 6; TUR 1315; 3 Credits

From the late 1960s through the 1970s, a Chicana/o and U.S. Latino/a renaissance of the arts flowered, especially in the West, Southwest and on the East Coast, but the writings were relatively unknown outside of college ethnic literature courses. Then along came the so-called Latino explosion of the ’90s, and the market value of certain U.S. Latina authors and artists began to increase. A select few Chicano and Latina writers have been drawn into the mainstream of United States publishing: writers like Sandra Cisneros, Cristina García, and Alisa Valdes-Rodriguez are, if not household names, at least better-known than their predecessors. In reading bestselling authors as well as less well-known writers as well as the work now known as “chica lit,” we will examine the ways assumptions-esthetic, social, political, and market-driven-about ethnicity, race, and gender have changed (and in some ways remained the same) over the last decade or so, around 1998-2008. This course will require three take-home exams, regular reading quizzes, and study questions. (WST: H)

Cultural Production of Masculinities

Timothy Fogarty
WST 3930 – Section 1390
MWF 7; TUR 2336;3 Credits

Gender constructions are an integral component of cultural production and masculinities are the hegemonic genders of many contemporary cultures. This course will challenge us through readings, writings, class discussions and ethnographic interviews to understand the matrix of distinct values and practices that are embedded in various masculinities from around the world. (WST: SS, TPS)

Sex, Race, Gender, and Society

Kendal Broad
WST 3930– Section 1421
MWF 6; NRN033; 3 Credits

This course will examine social and cultural constructions of sexuality, race, gender, social class, and disability in the US. Central to that analysis will be a focus on issues of power, inequality and how oppressions interlock and intersect. (WST: SS, TPS)

African Women Writers

Rose Lugano
WST 3930 – Section 4929
T 7-8 and R 7; TUR 2349, TUR 2350;3 Credits

The course will enable students to explore African women writers and critics, look at their theoretical priorities, literary themes and cultural positions. It is designed to provide students with both a specific and a general view of the status, achievements and experiences of African women in fiction. Using different genres (novels and plays) we will endeavor to understand how women’s literary expression has been shaped by history, culture, and their experiences, as well as see how they are addressing issues of gender in their respective societies. Discussions will focus on issues of identity, oppression, resistance, exile, language, translation and colonialism, using as points of entry a diverse set of texts. Finally, students will examine how African women writers are using writing itself as a tool for social transformation and critique. (WST: H)

Motherhood in Modern Hebrew Fiction

Abraham Balaban
WST 3930 – Section 5331
T 5 and R 4-5; TUR 2349, TUR 2353; 3 Credits

Israel was founded on expressed ideas of a complete equality between the sexes. Yet, until the last two decades of the twentieth century, Hebrew fiction was mainly a male domain, and women were rarely depicted as full blown human beings. In the last two decades a new wave of female writers started publishing their work, and the image of women has become much richer and more diverse. The rationale of the course is to explore the different manners women are depicted in Hebrew fiction throughout the twentieth century. Special attention is given to the changes that occurred in the last two decades, with the appearance of a new wave of female writers. NO HEBREW KNOWLEDGE IS REQUIRED. (WST: H)

Gender in the Hebrew Bible

Robert Kawashima
WST 3930 – Section 5542
T 4 and R 4-5; TUR 2346, TUR 2333; 3 Credits

A critical examination of the literary representation and historical realities of gender and sexuality in ancient Israel through close readings of selected texts from the Hebrew Bible. (WST: H)

Sex in the Global City

Florence Babb
WST 3930 – Section 6674, WST 3930 – Section 8113
T 6 and R 6-7; LIT 0217, LIT 0233 T 6, R 6, R 7; LIT 0217, LIT 233, LIT 223
3 Credits

This course considers gender and urban space, drawing on feminist, anthropological, and other literature. We will read ethnographies (case studies) based in cities of the Global South and North in an effort to understand how urban lives vary depending on gender, social class, race, sexuality, and other social differences. Some of the themes we will examine include the following: the growth of urban centers and informal economic sectors as a result of neoliberalism and globalization; the emergence of youth cultures as populations expand; the growth of social movements including those representing interests of women and sexual minorities; the development of popular culture and new consumer practices. Students will have an opportunity to carry out research projects on the gendered effects of accelerated change in cities as diverse as New York, Bangkok, and Mexico City. (WST: H, SS, TPS, GID)

Women in French Literature Seminar

Sylvie Blum
WST 3930 – Section 7466
M 9-11 and W E1-E3; TUR 2334, TUR2322; 3 Credits

The courses examines the representation of woman in literary, cultural and filmic texts based in 20th century France. There will be a segment devoted to expatriate female artists living in France in the interwar and post-WW2 period. Topics will include: visual representations, avant-garde cinema, experimental writing, fashion, performance, interwar period, postcolonialFrance, expatriate writers, early women directors and contemporary women directors. (WST: H)

Rethinking Globalization: Gender/Communities/Representation

Anita Anantharam
WST 4930 – Section 1902, WST 6935 – Section 4766
W 7-9; MAT 0113; 3 Credits

Globalization is one of those buzzwords that has been debated and scrutinized heavily in recent years. The term has been used to designate a wide variety of practices from the movement of goods and capital, to the migration of people across national boundaries, to an imposed standardization of lifestyles. This class focuses on readings that are critical of the uneven effects of globalization and neoliberal global political economies. We will consider a variety of analytical and theoretical frameworks with the intention of developing nuanced approaches to today’s transnational political economies that are sensitive to gender issues, local and communal practices, and politics of representation. (WST: SS, GID)

Capstone Seminar in Women’s Studies

Stephanie Evans
WST4935 – Section 8483, WST 6935- Section 2323
MWF 6; UST 108; 3 Credits

This course (required for all majors) is the culmination of the Women’s Studies major. It explores some examples of past and present scholarship to reaffirm the interdisciplinary nature of the field and to highlight the relationships among feminist theory, intellectual practice, and social change. The bulk of the semester is devoted to a full-length independent project on a topic of student’s own choosing.

Internship

Faculty
Variable Credits 1-3
WST 4940 – Section Department Controlled
Can be repeated up to 6 credits

For advanced undergraduate students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research. Online application.

Independent Study

Faculty
WST 4905 – Section Department Controlled
Can be repeated up to 6 credits

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair and 1 Women’s Studies course or course that counts for women’s studies Independent reading or research under guidance. Online application.

Honor’s Thesis

Faculty
WST 4970 – Section Department Controlled

Students register for this course when pursuing an Honors Thesis in the WST major. In accordance with the protocols established by WST and the Honors Program, students design and pursue an independent research project with guidance from an advisor. Further information is available here.

Fall 2008

NOTE: Letters in parenthesis indicate how the class fills a distribution requirement in the WST General Concentration and/or whether it counts for the TPS or GID track in the major. If a course fills a Gen Ed requirement, that is specified separately.

Interdisciplinary Perspectives in Women’s Studies

Tim Fogarty, Trysh Travis
WST 3015 – Section 0853, WST 3015 – Section 1579 (Gordon Rule 4)
MWF 4; TUR 2336; 3 Credits T 11-E2; MAT 0105; 3 Credits

The life experiences of women through the study of materials in the humanities, social and natural sciences and in the health professions. This is a required course for the Women’s Studies major and minor and it fulfills the general education requirement in diversity. It can also be taken as an elective. (Gen Ed: H, S, D; WST: Core)

Ecofeminism

Sandra Russo
WST 3349 – Section 6439, WST 6348 – Section 6444
M 9-11; PUGH 120; 3 Credits

Ecofeminism focuses on Western tradition’s naturalization of women and feminization of nature, drawing the conclusion that the domination of women and the domination of nature are intimately connected and mutually reinforcing. This hypothesized connection of women and nature oppressions gives rise to a common formative structure of “othering” shared by women, animals, nature, people of color and ethnically colonized groups. The course surveys ecofeminist theories, exploring the links between ecological values, principles, activism, and feminisms. Spiritual, philosophical, and activist perspectives are examined through interdisciplinary lens. Teamwork, field trips, and a joint class project are important components of the course. (WST: SS, GID)

Transnational Feminism

Anita Anantharam
WST 3415 – Section 9628
T 3, R 3-4; TUR 2342; 3 Credits

This course places women and feminism in a transnational perspective, focusing on various theories and movements engendered by women in contemporary national contexts. Development, reproductive politics, women’s health, etc., will be examined. (Gen Ed: S, N; WST: Core)

Women and Film

Mauren Cheryn Turim
WST 3930 – Section 2535
M E1E3, T 4, R 4-5; TUR 2322; 4 Credits

This course will examine how women have been represented in film, how they have participated in film production, and how they consume film images. We will look at various feminist approaches and the range of debates as to how to address these issues. The course will have several goals; to introduce you to the history of women in film, to increase your skills in reading film, in reading critical writing about film, and in understanding the relation between writing critical analysis and feminist theory. Emphasis will be on such basic issues as viewer identification and cultural context as currently formulated through various feminist and post-structuralist methodologies. We will explore how feminism intersects with psychoanalysis, ideology, deconstruction and related approaches. We will examine the conjuncture of theoretical issues with an experience of specific texts, and the function of these texts in the past and present workings of history. (WST: H)

Women’s Poetry

Marsha C. Bryant
WST 3930 – Section 2550
T 7, R 7-8; TUR 2336; 3 Credits

The term “women’s poetry” isn’t as simple as it appears. It is the same thing as “feminist” poetry? Does domesticity restrict or expand women’s poetry? Does women’s poetry always challenge literary tradition, or counter popular culture? How does the “women’s poetry” label affect the ways we read, and how should it? In this course, we will study poetry by Edna Saint Vincent Millay, Gertrude Stein, H.D., Stevie Smith, Gwendolyn Brooks, Sylvia Plath, Rita Dove, Carol Ann Duffy, and one additional poet. We will also place the poems in biographical and cultural contexts. Your careful preparation for and participation in discussion are important for the success of this class. Assignments include an explication paper, a magazine paper, an anthology review, a panel presentation, and a parody. (GenEd: H, D; WST: H)

Women of Color in the US

Stephanie Evans
WST 3930 – Section 4081
M,W,F 6 ; TUR 2333; 3 Credits

This course is designed to provide an overview of the intersection of race, ethnicity, sex, and gender presence, oppression, and creative resistance in the historical and contemporary experience of Native American, Asian American, African American, and Latina women. The course seeks to enhance understanding of how racism and sexism function in the political, social, and economic systems of the U.S. Women of color in the U.S. have formed communities of resistance that will be explored in their writings. (WST: H/SS)

Women and Poverty

Amanda Davis
WST 3930 – Section 4127
T 10-E1; TUR 2342; 3 Credits

This course will examine some of the varied effects of poverty on women and children in the wake of recent social, political and programming shifts, as well as how poverty intersects with other systems of inequality like racism and sexism. Our area of study in this course is varied and complex, but so I hope will be our class discussions and our approaches to better understanding the social, material, and political dimensions of poverty. (WST: H/SS)

Women in Early America

Juliana Barr
WST 3930 – Section 4803
T, R 7, 7-8; LIT 121; 3 Credits

This course will examine questions of identity, race, sexuality, and power as they shaped women’s lives from first contacts between Europeans and American Indians in the sixteenth century through the interactions of Anglo-, African-, and Native Americans in the nineteenth-century United States. (WST: H/SS)

Women in Modern Hebrew Fiction

Avraham Balaban
WST 3930 – Section 5044
T 5, TUR 1315; R 4-5,TUR 2333; 3 Credits

Israel was founded on expressed ideas of a complete equality between the sexes. Yet, until the last two decades of the twentieth century, Hebrew fiction was mainly a male domain, and women were rarely depicted as full blown human beings. In the last two decades a new wave of female writers started publishing their work, and the image of women has become much richer and more diverse. The rationale of the course is to explore the different manners women are depicted in Hebrew fiction throughout the twentieth century. Special attention is given to the changes that occurred in the last two decades, with the appearance of a new wave of female writers. NO HEBREW KNOWLEDGE IS REQUIRED. (GenEd: H, N; WST: H)

Independent Study

Faculty
Variable Credits 1-3
WST 4905 – Section Department Controlled
Can be repeated up to 6 credits

For advanced undergraduate students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research. Online application.

East/West Encounters

Anita Anantharam
WST 4930 – Section 4082
T 6, TUR 2342; R 6-7, TUR 2350; 3 Credits

Can we imagine a history of the present without referring to and referencing Europe? Does the “post” in post-colonialism signify a break with colonial history and thought? Or, do we see structural similarities between colonial pasts and the post-colonial present? Why does the “trans” in transnational often imply an orientation to the West? Through a close study of works of history, colonialism, literature, and critical race theory, we will attempt find models for reconsidering the history of ideas in the modern West—and explore how these ideas—of universalism, liberalism, and freedom—were/are used to justify racial, sexual, national, and political domination. (WST: H/SS; GID)

Gender & Language

Martha J. Hardman
WST 4930 – Section 6138
T 7, AND 0019; R 7-8, AND 0019; 3 Credits

This course offers the student an opportunity to study how language is used by women and men and about women and men in the various domains of interaction (e.g. social, family, workplace) to create and sustain status and power in society. It offers the chance to: Study how sex and sexism are realized through language, investigate the myths about language and woman’s place, learn how gender and politeness interact, ponder how women are derogated in language, reflect on the repercussions of the generic masculine in grammar, study how female-male miscommunication arises, come to terms with gendered language and power in society, including the language of sexual harassment, learn how girls and boys are linguistically socialized in gendered ways, ponder the question of difference vs. dominance. (GenEd: S, D; WST: H, SS)

Women’s/Gender Studies Honors Thesis

Faculty
WST 4970- Section department controlled
3 Credits

Students register for this course when pursuing an Honors Thesis in the WST major. In accordance with the protocols established by WST and the Honors Program, students design and pursue an independent research project with guidance from an advisor. Further information is available here.

Internship

Faculty
WST 4940 – Section Department Controlled
Can be repeated up to 6 credits

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair This course is designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. Online Application

Summer 2008

Interdisciplinary Perspectives of Women

Tim Fogarty
WST 3015 – Section 0343 (Summer B)
MTWRF 2; TUR 1315; 3 Credits

The life experiences of women through the study of materials in the humanities, social and natural sciences and in the health professions. This is a required course for the Women’s Studies major and minor and it fulfills the general education requirement in diversity. It can also be taken as an elective. (Gen Ed: H, S, D; WST: Core)

Interdisciplinary Perspectives of Women

Amanda Davis
WST 3015 – Section 4301 (Summer A)
MTWRF 2; TUR 1315; 3 Credits

The life experiences of women through the study of materials in the humanities, social and natural sciences and in the health professions. This is a required course for the Women’s Studies major and minor and it fulfills the general education requirement in diversity. It can also be taken as an elective. (Gen Ed: H, S, D; WST: Core)

Transnational Feminisms

Amanda Davis
WST 3415 – Section 4490 Summer B;
MTWRF 3; MAT 0103; 3 Credits

This course places women and feminism in a transnational perspective, focusing on various theories and movements engendered by women in contemporary national contexts. Development, reproductive politics, women’s health, etc., will be examined. (Fills Gen Ed Requirements for: H, SS, I; WST: Core)

Independent Study

Staff
Variable Credits 1-3, Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 4905 – Section Department Controlled

For advanced undergraduate students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research.

UF in India: Rethinking Globalization: Gender, Communities, Representation

Study Abroad Summer 2008 Location: Navdanya Farm, Dehra Dun, India
WST 4956, Sec 0235. 3 credits (SS/H; GID) WST 6957 SEC 0239, 3 credits

Course Highlights: •Live in an organic farm community •Daily yoga instruction •Dormitory housing (double occupancy) •3 locally grown, organic meals/day included •Excursions to nearby pilgrimage sites •Workshops on indigenous plants and traditional medicine •Trekking in the Himalayan foothills Instructors: Anita Anantharam (UF Women’s Studies), Travis L. Smith (UF Religion) Visiting Instructors: Vandana Shiva (Navdanya), John Campbell (Columbia University), and Pavlos Georgiadis (University ofHohenheim)

Internship

Staff
1-3 Credits, Can be repeated up to 6 credits
WST 4940 – Section Department Controlled

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair This course is designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. An application can be found at http://www.wst.ufl.edu/Internships.htm.

Spring 2008

Interdisciplinary Perspectives of Women

Tace Hedrick, Anita Anantharam, Trysh Travis
WST 3015 – Section 1358, WST 3015 – Section 4454, WST 3015 – Section 6895
T 5, R 6-7; TUR 2305; 3 Credits MWF 4; TUR 1315; 3 Credits T, 3 R 3-4; TUR 2349; 3 Credits (GR:4)

Drawing on materials and methodologies from a variety of disciplines, this class explores the diverse experiences of women, both in past eras and in the present, in the U.S. and abroad. Required for the Women’s Studies major and minor; fulfills the General Education requirement in international studies and diversity. (Fills Gen Ed Requirements for: H, SS, D)

Transnational Feminisms

Anita Anantharam
WST 3415– Section 5401
MWF 6; TUR 2333; 3 Credits

This course places women and feminism in a transnational perspective, focusing on various theories and movements engendered by women in contemporary national contexts. Development, reproductive politics, women’s health, etc., will be examined. (Fills Gen Ed Requirements for: H, SS, I)

Global Violence Against Women

Amanda Davis
WST 3930– Section 0472
R 10E1 TUR 2333; 3 Credits

This course examines the range of forms of violence committed against women, many of the global consequences of this violence, and the resistance strategies and structural changes being created to lessen it. Although violence against women is usually regarded as a cultural constant that exists in virtually every part of the world, we will make a focused effort to assess the specific social and geographical contexts in which it occurs and the effects on particular areas and communities that it can have. The class, as a result, will be largely international in scope. (H/SS)

Women of Color in the US

Stephanie Evans
WST 3930 – Section 1390
T 8-9 and R 8; TUR 2305; 3 Credits

This course is designed to provide an overview of the intersection of race, ethnicity, sex, and gender presence, oppression, and creative resistance in the historical and contemporary experience of Native American, Asian American, African American, and Latina women. The course seeks to enhance understanding of how racism and sexism function in the political, social, and economic systems of the U.S. Women of color in the U.S. have formed communities of resistance that will be explored in their writings. (H/SS)

Gender in Arab Culture

Atiqa Hachimi
WST 3930 – Section 1421
T 5-6, LIT 233; R 6, MAT 2; 3 Credits
Joined with PRT 2490/1531 Studies . (H, GID)

Cultural Production of Masculinities

Timothy Fogarty
WST 3930 – Section 2949
M 7, W 7-8; Room TBA; 3 Credits

Gender constructions are an integral component of cultural production and masculinities are the hegemonic genders of many contemporary cultures. This course will challenge us through readings, writings, class discussions and ethnographic interviews to understand the matrix of distinct values and practices that are embedded in various masculinities from around the world. (SS, TPS)

African Women Writers

Rose Lugano
WST 3930 – Section 4929
T 7-8; TUR 2318, R 7, TUR 2336; 3 Credits

The course will enable students to explore African women writers and critics, look at their theoretical priorities, literary themes and cultural positions. It is designed to provide students with both a specific and a general view of the status, achievements and experiences of African women in fiction. Using different genres (novels and plays) we will endeavor to understand how women’s literary expression has been shaped by history, culture, and their experiences, as well as see how they are addressing issues of gender in their respective societies. Discussions will focus on issues of identity, oppression, resistance, exile, language, translation and colonialism, using as points of entry a diverse set of texts. Finally, students will examine how African women writers are using writing itself as a tool for social transformation and critique. (H)

Motherhood in Modern Hebrew Literature

Abraham Balaban
WST 3930 – Section 5331
T 7-8; TUR 2318, R 7, TUR 2336; 3 Credits

This course examines applied feminist theories regarding motherhood to the field of modern Hebrew literature. (H)

Independent Study

Faculty
Variable Credits 1-3
WST 4905 – Section Department Controlled
Can be repeated up to 6 credits

For advanced undergraduate students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research. Online application.

Capstone Seminar in Women’s Studies

Trysh Travis
WST 4935 – Section 1883
T 7, R 7-8; UST 108; 3 Credits

This course (required for all majors) is the culmination of the Women’s Studies major. It explores some examples of past and present scholarship to reaffirm the interdisciplinary nature of the field and to highlight the relationships among feminist theory, intellectual practice, and social change. The bulk of the semester is devoted to a full-length independent project on a topic of student’s own choosing.

Internship

Milagros Peña
WST 4940 – Section Department Controlled
Can be repeated up to 6 credits

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair This course is designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. Online Application

Fall 2007

NOTE: Letters in parenthesis indicate how the class fills a distribution requirement in the WST General Concentration and/or whether it counts for the TPS or GID track in the major. If a course fills a Gen Ed requirement, that is specified separately.

Interdisciplinary Perspectives of Women

Anita Anantharam, Amanda Davis
WST 3015 – Section 0853; WST 3015 – Section 1579
MWF 10; TUR 1315; 3 Credits T 6, R 6-7; TUR 221; 3 Credits

The life experiences of women through the study of materials in the humanities, social and natural sciences and in the health professions. This is a required course for the Women’s Studies major and minor and it fulfills the general education requirement in international studies and diversity. It can also be taken as an elective. (Gen Ed: H, S, D; WST: Core)

Transnational Feminisms

Anita Anantharam
WST 3415 – Section 9628
T 2-3, NRN 331, R 3; FLG 225; 3 Credits

This course places women and feminism in a transnational perspective, focusing on various theories and movements engendered by women in contemporary national contexts. Development, reproductive politics, women’s health, etc., will be examined. (Gen Ed: S, D; WST: Core)

Sex Rights

Angel Kwolek-Folland
WST 3930– Section 4292
W 8-10, TUR 2318; 3 Credits

This course will explore the development of “sexual rights” as a social, discursive, legal, and populist category in several international contexts, such as the workplace, corporate policies, the European Union, and popular culture. (WST: H, SS, TPS, GID)

Women in Modern Hebrew Fiction

Avraham Balaban
WST 3930 – Section 2966
T 4-5, LIT 0207; R 5, LIT 0223; 3 Credits

Israel was founded on expressed ideas of a complete equality between the sexes. Yet, until the last two decades of the twentieth century, Hebrew fiction was mainly a male domain, and women were rarely depicted as full blown human beings. In the last two decades a new wave of female writers started publishing their work, and the image of women has become much richer and more diverse. The rationale of the course is to explore the different manners women are depicted in Hebrew fiction throughout the twentieth century. Special attention is given to the changes that occurred in the last two decades, with the appearance of a new wave of female writers. NO HEBREW KNOWLEDGE IS REQUIRED. (WST: H)

Sex and the Global City

Florence Babb
WST 3930 – Section 4081
MWF 4; TUR 2336; 3 Credits

This course considers gender and urban space, drawing on feminist, anthropological, and other literature. We will read ethnographies (case studies) based in cities of the Global South and North in an effort to understand how urban lives vary depending on gender, social class, race, sexuality, and other social differences. Some of the themes we will examine include the following: the growth of urban centers and informal economic sectors as a result of neoliberalism and globalization; the emergence of youth cultures as populations expand; the growth of social movements including those representing interests of women and sexual minorities; the development of popular culture and new consumer practices. Students will have an opportunity to carry out research projects on the gendered effects of accelerated change in cities as diverse as New York, Bangkok, and Mexico City. (WST: H, SS, TPS, GID)

Black Gender

Stephanie Y. Evans
WST 3930 – Section 5113
R 8-10; MAT 102; 3 Credits

In this course students will explore various ways that African American gender has been and can be performed, articulated, and researched. Using social science, humanities, and natural science materials from the early 20th-century to present, students will ask and answer questions about gendered aspects of race relevant to their own academic discipline. (WST: H, SS, TPS)

Lesbian and Gay Studies

Kendal Broad
WST 4641– Section 4089
T 6, R 6-7; MAT 108; 3 Credits

In general, this course is an overview of social science research comprising the emerging area of research now known as Lesbian & Gay Studies. The course examines the history of studying “homosexuality” via the lens of social science and engages studies about identity and community and the place of social institutions in regulating and producing sexualities. The course ends with in-depth consideration of present and future research. (WST: SS, TPS)

Independent Study

Faculty
Variable Credits 1-3
WST 4905 – Section Department Controlled
Can be repeated up to 6 credits

For advanced undergraduate students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research. Online application.

Feminist Activisms

Kendal Broad
WST 4930 – Section 4082
W 6-8, TUR 2346; 3 Credits

This class is designed as a collaborative seminar to critically observe and analyze feminist action (activism, politics, and social movements). The class will discuss various examples of feminist activism and gender-based social movements (e.g., activist mothering and men’s movements), examine various forms of feminist action (e.g., community-based activism and institutional protest), and critically observe and analyze current examples of feminist action. (WST: SS, TPS)

Sociolingustics of Gender and Language

Diana Boxer
Joined with LIN 5657 WST 4930 – Section 6138
T 7-8, AND, 21; R 7-8, AND 13; 3 Credits

This course offers the student an opportunity to study how language is used by women and men and about women and men in the various domains of interaction (e.g. social, family, workplace) to create and sustain status and power in society. It offers the chance to: Study how sex and sexism are realized through language, investigate the myths about language and woman’s place, learn how gender and politeness interact, ponder how women are derogated in language, reflect on the repercussions of the generic masculine in grammar, study how female-male miscommunication arises, come to terms with gendered language and power in society, including the language of sexual harassment, learn how girls and boys are linguistically socialized in gendered ways, ponder the question of difference vs. dominance. (WST: H, SS)

Gender and Genesis

Gwynn Kessler
WST 4930 – Section 7276
T 8-9, TUR 2333; R 9, TUR 2336; 3 Credits

The first two chapters of the biblical book of Genesis offer two very different ancient accounts of the creation of humanity and the construction of gender. The rest of the book of Genesis offers a unique portrayal of family dynamics, drama and dysfunction, full of complex and compelling narratives where gender is constantly negotiated and renegotiated. In this class, students will engage in close readings of primary biblical sources and contemporary [feminist and queer] scholarship about these texts, as we explore what the first book of the Bible says about God, gender, power, sexuality, and “family values.” (WST: H, TPS)

Internship

Milagros Peña
WST 4940 – Section Department Controlled
Can be repeated up to 6 credits

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair This course is designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. Online Application.

Independent Study

Faculty
Variable Credits 1-3
WST 6905 – Section Department Controlled
Can be repeated up to 6 credits

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair and 1 Women’s Studies course or course that counts for women=s studies Independent reading or research under guidance. Online application.

Spring 2007

Interdisciplinary Perspectives of Women

Trysh Travis, Anita Anantharam, Ana Liberato
WST 3015 – Section 1358, WST 3015 – Section 4454, WST 3015 – Section 6895
T 6, R 6-7; MAT 119; 3 Credits MWF 3; TUR 1315; 3 Credits MWF 4; TUR 2333; 3 Credits

Drawing on materials and methodologies from a variety of disciplines, this class explores the diverse experiences of women, both in past eras and in the present, in the U.S. and abroad. Required for the Women’s Studies major and minor; fulfills the General Education requirement in international studies and diversity. (H, S, I)

Transnational Feminisms

Anita Anantharam
WST 3415– Section 5401
MWF 5; TUR 2333; 3 Credits

This course places women and feminism in a transnational perspective, focusing on various theories and movements engendered by women in contemporary national contexts. Development, reproductive politics, women’s health, etc., will be examined.

Sex Rights

Angel Kwolek-Folland
WST 3930– Section 1170
W 8-10 UST 108; 3 Credits

This course places women and feminism in a transnational perspective, focusing on various theories and movements engendered by women in contemporary national contexts. Development, reproductive politics, women’s health, etc., will be examined.

Women of Color in the US

Stephanie Evans
WST 3930 – Section 1390
T 4 and R 4-5; TUR 2306;3 Credits

This course is designed to provide an overview of the intersection of race, ethnicity, sex, and gender presence, oppression, and creative resistance in the historical and contemporary experience of Native American, Asian American, African American, and Latina women. The course seeks to enhance understanding of how racism and sexism function in the political, social, and economic systems of the U.S. Women of color in the U.S. have formed communities of resistance that will be explored in their writings.

Modern Brazilian Literature

Charles Perrone
WST 3930 – Section 5331
T 5-6, LIT 233; R 6, MAT 2; 3 Credits

Joined with PRT 2490/1531 Studies in Brazilian literature since modernism (1920s) emphasizing national identity, gender issues, urbanization, and internationalization. Fiction, and some poetry, considered in aesthetic, sociocultural and geohistorical contexts. A general goal is to discover creativity and diversity, dispelling common stereotypes and uncritical images of the land and the people. (H, I)

Women and Development

Ana S.Q. Liberato
WST 3930 – Section 1421
MWF 8; TUR 1315; 3 Credits

This course is based on two important assumptions: 1) development policies and politics have specific historical and political backgrounds, and 2) economic development affects diverse groups of women and men differently. We will study some of the theories behind development paradigms and strategies and explore the experiences of women in different development situations. The meaning of gender roles, international development, and empowerment are explored from a feminist perspective. The course considers the ways in which women have been marginalized in the development process and explores feminist work on this subject. As part of the course work, we will evaluate case study examples from the readings and have discussion sessions, class presentations, and writing and internet assignments.

20th Century Women’s Poetry

Marsha Bryant
WST 3930 – Section 4929
T 7, R 7-8, WEIM 1070; 3 Credits

Joined with Lit 3383/7177 The term “women’s poetry” isn’t as simple as it appears. It is the same thing as “feminist” poetry? Does domesticity restrict or expand women’s poetry? Does women’s poetry always challenge literary tradition, or counter popular culture? How does the “women’s poetry” label affect the ways we read, and how should it? In this course we will study poetry by Edna Saint Vincent Millay, Gertrude Stein, H.D., Stevie Smith, Gwendolyn Brooks, Sylvia Plath, Rita Dove, and Julia Alvarez. We will also place the poems in biographical and cultural contexts. Assignments include 3 analytical papers (explication, anthology review, cultural analysis), a panel presentation, and a parody.

Women’s Autobiographies

Amanda Davis
WST 3930 – Section 6828
R 9-11; TUR 2306;3 Credits

This class will focus on women’s autobiographical texts and the ways in which female authors explore and problematize issues surrounding identity, subjectivity, power, and resistance in their narratives. Given the diversity of the genre and the sheer number of texts that have been produced, this course will concentrate specifically on women’s memoirs of activism and their (often announced) autobiographical accounts of living on various borders. Drawing from Gloria Anzaldua’s description of the borderland as a “place of contradictions” that emerges “wherever two or more cultures edge each other,” we will look closely at how writers respond to the various social, historical, and political conditions that surround them and inform their writing. Texts will be drawn from writers situated in different disciplines and regions who choose varying formats to position themselves as writing subjects. Particular attention will be directed to how these writers conceptualize issues of race, class, gender, sexuality, nationality, and often most important, their intersection. In addition to other course requirements, students will have the opportunity to compose their own edited collection of women’s autobiographical writings throughout the term.

Gender Representation in Visual Art

Melissa Hyde
WST 3930 – Section 2893
T 5-6, LIT 233; R 6, MAT 2; 3 Credits

Joined with ARH 3423/2893 This course will offer an examination of selected European works, (especially by women) from the Renaissance to the end of the nineteenth century. Our aim will be to consider ways historians can understand the gendering of pictorial practice, and interpret the practices of representing gendered subjects. Particular consideration will be given to the historical contexts, conceptions of gender and cultural attitudes towards women that conditioned their experiences and artistic practices. Themes addressed in the course include: women’s self-representation, work and leisure as they relate to notions of the public and private in art, the ways in which women have negotiated the structures of art institutions, their relationship to patronage and the art market. Also important for this course are issues having to do with the sexual politics of looking (particularly looking at the nude). We will be exploring the ways in which women as artists and beholders have produced or assumed a range of different positions in relation to representing, looking and being represented. The aim of this course then, is not simply to substitute a “feminized” history of art for the traditionally “masculine” one, but to consider critically case studies of women as artists, beholders and subjects of art in dynamic contact with the artistic production and viewing by men. Readings will focus on specific artists and paintings, but will also involve some theoretical inquiry into larger categories of gender, sexuality and “otherness.” Issues of the gaze will figure prominently. The course will thus include materials from the fields of history, literary and film theory, gender and cultural studies.

Pre-req: ARH 2051 or permission of instructor.

Women and Film

Maureen Turim
WST 3930 – Section 8954
T 4 and R 4-5; W E1-E3 and TUR 2322; 4Credits

Joined with ENG 4134/6447 This course will examine how women have been represented in film, how they have participated in film production, and how they consume film images. We will look at various feminist approaches and the range of debates as to how to address these issues. The course will have several goals; to introduce you to the history of women in film, to increase your skills in reading film, in reading critical writing about film, and in understanding the relation between writing critical analysis and feminist theory. Emphasis will be on such basic issues as viewer identification and cultural context as currently formulated through various feminist and post-structuralist methodologies. We will explore how feminism intersects with psychoanalysis, ideology, deconstruction and related approaches. We will examine the conjuncture of theoretical issues with an experience of specific texts, and the function of these texts in the past and present workings of history. Course Requirements: Two papers of 8 pages each (35% and 35%), plus class discussion and miscellaneous assignments (30%). Participation in class discussion is essential. WebCT participation as well. Students must attend scheduled screenings.

Independent Study

Faculty
Variable Credits 1-3
WST 4905 – Section Department Controlled
Can be repeated up to 6 credits

For advanced undergraduate students who desire to supplement the regular courses by independent reading or research. Online application.

Women and Islam

Gwendolyn Simmons
WST 4930 – Section 0623
R 8-10,TUR B310; 3 Credits
Joined with REL 4936/6077

This course will cast a feminist insider perspective on the volatile subject of “Women and Islam.” Most non-Muslims credit Islam as being the root cause of the oppression of women in the Muslim world. However, a growing number of Muslim women scholars and activists have begun to challenge the notion that Islam is synonymous with the oppression of women. In this course we will review the history of the religion and women’s place in it, bringing to the foreground the significant role women played in Islam’s early history. We will also examine the situation of Muslim women contemporarily from both the perspectives of Islamic Nationalists and Islamists. Both groups see that women are a crucial component for the preservation of Islamic societies.

Women in German Literature

Jennifer Coenen
WST 4930 – Section 1847
MWF 6, TUR 2333; 3 Credits
Joined with GEW 4750/1352

This course serves as an introduction to literature, film, and hypermedia by 20th century women writers and directors from German speaking countries. The course will utilize an interdisciplinary approach based on feminist film, literary, and cultural theory. We will read texts by Rosa Luxemburg, Marieluise Fleißer, Veza Canetti, Marlen Haushofer, Christa Wolf, Ingeborg Bachmann, Ulrike Meinhof, Verena Stefan, and Elfriede Jelinek, among others, and discuss theoretical writings by Anglo-American, French, and German feminists. We will also view the films Girl in Uniform, Germany, Pale Mother, Rosa Luxemburg, and Nobody Loves Me, as well as explore the CD-ROM Bilder der Berührungen. Students will become acquainted with the main themes and structures found in the works and understand the unique contribution that these artists have made to “German” culture. All texts and media originally published in German are read and viewed in translation.

African Women Writers

Rose Lugano
WST 4930 – Section 5110
T 7-8, Rinker 215; R 7, Flint 113; 3 Credits
Joined with 3382/2843

The course will enable students to explore African women writers and critics, look at their theoretical priorities, literary themes and cultural positions. It is designed to provide students with both a specific and a general view of the status, achievements and experiences of African women in fiction. Using different genres (novels and plays) we will endeavor to understand how women’s literary expression has been shaped by history, culture, and their experiences, as well as see how they are addressing issues of gender in their respective societies. Discussions will focus on issues of identity, oppression, resistance, exile, language, translation and colonialism, using as points of entry a diverse set of texts. Finally, students will examine how African women writers are using writing itself as a tool for social transformation and critique.

US Empire and Gender

Malini Schueller
WST 4930– Section 6089
T 5-6, TUR 2305, R 6, TUR 2318; 3 Credits
Joined with LIT 4183/2687

Taking imperialism as central to the construction of the United States’ national imaginary, this course will raise a number of questions about the intersection of empire and gender. How is the language of empire gendered? How does gender structure metaphors such as the frontier? How are representations of colonized spaces and racial others invested with discourses of gender? How does the captivity narrative persist in the narrative of contemporary imperialism? We will focus on specific sites of empire such as Hawaii, Mexico, the Philippines, and Vietnam and examine the literary and cultural texts that emerge from those sites. Most of our readings will be from the twentieth century, but there will be some nineteenth century and eighteenth century works as well. Possible texts include Norman Taurog’s Blue Hawaii, Lois-Ann Yamanaka’s Blu’s Hanging, Le Ly Hayslip’s When Heaven and Earth Changed Places, John Luther Long’s Madame Butterfly, Hwang’s M. Butterfly, John Rollin Ridge’s The Life and Adventures of Joaquin Murieta, and Sarah Josepha Hale’s Liberia. We will also read the work of critics such as Edward Said, Anne McClintock, and Ann Laura Stoler.

Women, Work, and Pop Culture

Susan Hegeman
WST 4930 – Section 8949
T 8-9 and R 9, TUR 2333; 3 Credits
Joined with LIT 4535/3362

Arguably one of the biggest changes affecting American women over the last century has been their entry in unprecedented numbers into the public world of wage labor. This course will examine women’s labor, both paid and unpaid, through the lens of popular culture including films, popular literature, and fashion. In our discussions we will consider popular cultural materials not simply as evidence of dramatic historical changes involving women and work, but as attempts to make sense of these changes as well. Readings will include historical and critical studies, popular nonfiction, and novels.

Capstone Seminar in Women’s Studies

Trysh Travis
WST 4935 – Section 1883
T 3-4, UST 108; R 4, NSC 225; 3 Credits

This course (required for all majors) is the culmination of the Women’s Studies major. It explores some examples of past and present scholarship to reaffirm the interdisciplinary nature of the field and to highlight the relationships among feminist theory, intellectual practice, and social change. The bulk of the semester is devoted to a full-length independent project on a topic of student’s own choosing.

Internship

Milagros Peña
WST 4940 – Section Department Controlled
Can be repeated up to 6 credits

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and program chair This course is designed for students desiring practical experience in the community. Students intern with a local agency, group or business involved in women’s issues. Online Application.

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