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The Department of Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management

Dr. Elizabeth "Betty" Dennis Baldwin

Associate Professor
Email: bettydennisb@gmail.com
Tel: 864-656-5357
Location: 271A Lehotsky Hall

Education:
B.A. Art History, Hollins College, 1989 
M.S. Environmental Science, Miami University, 1992
Ph.D. Forest Resources, University Maine, 2006

Additional Professional Responsibilities:  
Major Clemson University Research Project involvement
The Open Parks Grid (OPG) - Initiated in 2007 with a team other people in different departments at Clemson University. The OPG is a visionary plan that uses cyberinfrastructure to unite the highly distributed parks community of practitioners, academics (natural and social scientists), policy-makers, and citizens. This has required the building of a multi-disciplinary team that extends within and beyond Clemson University, and includes the National Park Service as first partner for beta testing. Currently partnering with global groups to aid in species recovery projects through networking.

Major Committee Assignments
  • Clemson University, Department of Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management, Departmental Advisory Committee (2010-present)
  • Clemson University, College of Health, Education, and Human Development, Student Learning Dispositions Ad-hoc Committee (2008-2009)
  • Clemson University, Department of Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management, PRTM Core Curriculum Re-design Committee (2007-2008)
  • Clemson University, Department of Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management, Graduate Committee (2007-2009)
Research Interests:
  • Conservation social science—understanding the social facets of conservation planning through research using interviews, surveys and visual research methods.
  • Culturally sensitive management—understanding cultural meanings and definitions of natural resources, especially protected areas so as to incorporate this in planning in order to mitigate conflict and maintain respect for cultural interests.
  • Parks and Protected Areas (PPA) sustainability and management effectiveness—research to develop a greater understanding of how parks are successful in terms of their mission and values they protect.
  • Environmental conflict and collaboration—research to develop information on patterns of successful collaboration, specifically in seemingly intractable conflict related to conservation areas
  • Cultural memory—research designed to understand fixed points in history that define a narrative of a place or relationship to a place and perception of management and/or policy related to place..
  • Vernacular conservation—research designed to understand the local, or vernacular definitions of importance of natural and cultural resources.
  • Qualitative research methodology, specifically in gaining essential understanding in PPA management—use of narrative research, phenomenology, expert opinion interviews, photo elicitation and document research methods as they help answer questions in the general field of parks recreation and tourism.
  • Environmental history and role in conservation planning — historical research related to PPA management.
  • Human connection to nature—understanding and measuring different perceptions of connection to nature.
  • Scale of place attachment—research to clarify different scales of place as defined by local residents, managers and other stakeholders of PPA and their surrounding areas.

Publications:
Wells, Jeremy and E. D. Baldwin. (In press). Historic Preservation, Significance, and Age Value: A Comparative Phenomenology of Historic Charleston and I’On. Journal of Environmental Psychology.

Beeco, J. A., Hallo, J.C., Baldwin E. D., & McGuire, F. A. (2011). An examination of the night hiking experience in parks and protected areas. Journal of Park and Recreation Administration, 29(4), 72-89.

Susan L. Slocum, Kenneth F. Backman and Elizabeth Baldwin. (In press) Independent Instrumental Case Studies: Allowing For the Autonomy of Cultural, Social, and Business Networks in Tanzania. In Field Guide for Case Study Research in Tourism, Hospitality and Leisure, ed.'s K. Hyde, C. Ryan and A.G. Woodside, Emerald Publishers, London.

Baldwin, E. D., and Richard Judd. (2010). Why history matters in Conservation Planning, In Trombulak, Stephen and Robert Baldwin, eds.  Multi-scale Conservation Planning, Springer-Verlag, 33-52.

Beazeley, Karen, E. D. Baldwin and Conrad Reining. (2010). Integrating expert judgment into systematic ecoregional conservation planning, In Trombulak, Stephen and Robert Baldwin, Eds.  Multi-scale Conservation Planning, Springer-Verlag, 235-255.

Holly, F. Matthew, Jeffrey C. Hallo, Elizabeth D. Baldwin, and Fran P. Mainella. (2009). Incentives and disincentives for day visitors to park and ride public transportation at Acadia National Park. Journal of Park and Recreation Administration, 28(2), 74-93.

Arsal, Irem, Kyle M.Woosnam, E. D. Baldwin and Sheila J. Backman. (2009). Residents as Travel Destination Information Providers: An Online Community Perspective. Travel Research, 49(4), 400-413.

Arsal, Irem, E. D. Baldwin and Sheila J. Backman. (2009). Member Reputation and its Influence on Travel Decisions. Journal of Information Technology and Tourism, 11, 1-12.

Baldwin, Robert F., Stephen Trombulak, and Elizabeth D. Baldwin (2009). Assessing risk of large-scale habitat conversion in lightly settled landscapes. Landscape and Urban Planning, 91(4), 219-225. 

Cross, Cinzia M., Backman, Kenneth F. and Baldwin, Elizabeth. (2009). The Effect of the Language Barrier on Intercultural Communication: A Case Study of Educational Travel in Italy. Journal of Teaching in Travel and Tourism, 9(1), 104-123.

Arsal, Irem, Shelia Backman and E. Baldwin. (2008). Influence of the online travel community on travel decisions. Information Technology and Travel and Tourism, Vienna.

Baldwin, E. D., L. Kenefic and Will Lapage.  (2007). The proposal for a national park in Maine’s managed forest: A review of large-scale conservation tools relevant to the Maine landscape. Maine Policy Review, 16(2), 78-91.

Grants and Self-funded Research Projects:
Total of externally funded projects: $1,424,673
Total of competitive internally funded projects: $120,985

  • CO-PI, NRPP-Natural Resources Management, from May 2014-May 2016, $443,200-PENDING (Title: Determining Movements of wild hogs for disease modeling and control efforts in BISO and GRSM (Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area and Great Smoky Mountains National Park). Lead Bill Stiver, Natural Resources Department, GRSM.
  • CO-PI, NSF-CNH program (Coupled Natural and Human Systems), from May 2012-May2016, $1,475,625-PENDING (Title: Parks and protected areas as infrastructure for a Sustainable Future: Investigating the Relationship between Ecological Structure and Human Health and Well Being).
  • CO-PI, Clemson University College of Health Education and Human Development Interdisciplinary Research Innovations Grant, $50,000-FUNDED (Title: Parks Protected Areas and Health in the United States: A Multilevel Study)
  • CO-PI, USDA (UNITED STATES DEPT OF AGRICULTURE, National Institute of Food and Agriculture) from 3/1/2012 to 2/28/2017, $479,000-FUNDED (Title: Landscape-Scale Thresholds of Early Successional Habitat: Reconciling Biodiversity, Public Perception, and Timber Yield in Managed Forests).
  • CO-PI, Clemson University College of Health Education and Human Development Interdisciplinary Research Innovations Grant, $50,000-FUNDED (Title: Parks as Models for Sustainability)
  • PI, University Research Grant Committee (URGC) Program at Clemson University, $4,985-FUNDED (Title: Archiving Narratives of People Displaced by a National Park)CO-PI, Institute of Museum and Library Sciences National Leadership Grant, $779,773, for Open Parks Grid-FUNDED (Title: The Open Parks Grid at Clemson University)
  • CO-PI, USDA National Forest Service grant for research, $29,900-FUNDED (Land-use planning for Future Forest Disturbance)
  • CO-PI, National Park Service, Southeast Region, Atlanta, GA, $136,000 for Open Parks Grid-FUNDED
  • Co-PI, Grant submitted to AFRI-EPA, as team member, Total requested: $250,000-NOT FUNDED
  • CO-PI, Grant proposal submitted to Cooperative Ecosystems Study Unit, as leader with four departments represented, total requested: $40,000-NOT FUNDED
  • PI, Clemson Information Technology Grant, $5,000 (Title: Seed grant to support development of the Open Parks Grid at Clemson University)-FUNDED
  • PI, College of HEHD, Clemson University, 2008 Summer Research Support Program, $4,000-FUNDED (Title: Understanding illegal transport of hogs adjacent to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park)
  • PI, College of HEHD, Clemson University, 2007 Summer Research Support Program, $7,000-FUNDED

DESCRIPTION OF RESEARCH PROJECTS
Externally Funded
$479,000 from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) (2011)-Landscape-Scale Thresholds of Early Successional Habitat: Reconciling Biodiversity, Public Perception, and Timber Yield in Managed Forests.  CO-PI with Susan Loeb and Tammy Cushing Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, and the Nantahala National Forest Service research division. My specific role will be to measure public perception as it relates to different harvest techniques designed to enhance biodiversity in the Nantahala National Forest.

$136,000 from the National Park Service (NPS) (2010)-The Open Parks Grid (OPG) at Clemson University, Co-PI (lead role).  Grant to support further development of the Open Parks Grid at Clemson University, specifically related to identifying and digitizing resources in the Southeast region of the NPS for addition to the OPG.

$29,000 from the United States Forest Service (2010)-Land-use planning for Future Forest Disturbance. Co-PI with Robert Baldwin Clemson University Department of Forestry and Natural Resources and Jeff Hepinstall of the University of Georgia. This is an interdisciplinary project between Clemson University and University of Georgia to assess future forest disturbance through the use of GIS and landowner interviews. My specific role is the methodology and implementation of the landowner interviews to take place spring 2012 at the America Planning Conference in Washington D. C.

$779,773 National Leadership Grant from Institute of Museum and Library Science (2009)-Open Parks Grid at Clemson University, Co-PI with Michael Whitt from Purdue and Emily Gore from Clemson University Libraries. This is a three-year grant is supporting the building of the infrastructure needed to build the Open Parks Grid in such a way that is can scale out to meet future needs. It also supports to building of a repository of digitized written materials and artifacts in the Southeast Region of the NPS. My role on this project is lead of the concept development team, Emily Gore, and now Chris Vincent from Clemson Libraries is lead of repository digitization team, and Michael Whitt from Perdue is head of the technical team, as he is from the HubZero project at Purdue, our major technical backend for the OPG.

Pending Externally Funded Grants
$443,200 from the NRPP-Natural Resources Management (2012)—Research to better predict movement of wild hogs on federally protected landscapes of Big South Fork National Recreation Area and Great Smoky Mountains National Park. This will be a project to look at the natural science of hog movement and couple this with the human dimensions of hog transport and movement that may be changing the biological dispersal patterns of hogs. My role will be to manage a Masters student to collect interview data that will be incorporated with the radio-telemetry work, and stable isotope work to determine hog movements and origins.

$1,475,625 from the National Science Foundation, Coupled Natural and Human systems program (2011)—Parks and protected areas as infrastructure for a Sustainable Future: Investigating the Relationship between Ecological Structure and Human Health and Well Being. Co-PI with Robert Powell, Robert Baldwin, Khoa Truong, from Clemson University and Steve Trombulak from Middlebury for a four-year project to research linkages between parks and quality of human health and well-being. Project will include a post-doctoral position and three graduate students.

$40,000 from the Friends of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, as approved by the Great Smoky Mountains Nation Park (GSMNP) (2010)- Research for Understanding the Human Dimensions of Wild Boar Management in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. PI on a research project designed to understand more fully the practice of hog transport, and hunting adjacent to a national park mandated to remove wild hogs as an invasive species. These local practices coupled with the threat of disease spread has made it even more important to understand the motivations, and the cultural value orientations of the communities adjacent to the national park regarding hog hunting and transport. Contact person and project developed with Jeff Troutman and Bill Stiver, both from the Natural Resource Management Division for the GSMNP.

Clemson University Funding-Competitive
$50,000 from Clemson University College of Health Education and Human Development Innovations Seed Grant (2012)- Parks and Protected Areas and Health in the United States: A Multilevel Study. CO-PI with Khoa Trong from Department of Health Science, Bob Powell from Parks Recreation and Tourism Management, and Rob Baldwin from Forestry and Natural Resources. This grant is to support work to look closely at the interface of Natural science and social science data related to parks and protected areas and how it interfaces with data from the Center for Disease Control in order to build content as well as direction for an NIH grant to support a more thorough study of the possible relationship between access to parks and protected areas and health indicators.

$50,000 from Clemson University College of Health Education and Human Development Innovations Seed Grant (2011)-Linkages between Human Health and Health of the landscape as represented by Parks and Protected Areas. CO-PI with Bob Powell from Parks Recreation and Tourism Management, Rob Baldwin from Forestry and Natural Resources, David White and Scott Hammel from Clemson Computing and Information Technologies, and Steve Trombulak from Middlebury College. This grant has supported work by Don Lipscomb and the team to develop preliminary research results to build a fall 2011 proposal to the NSF program on Coupled Natural and Human systems.

$4,985 from the University Research Grant Committee (URGC) Program at Clemson University (2011)-Archiving Narratives of People Displaced by a National Park. PI on a grant to travel to the community adjacent to the Core Banks National Seashore to interview locals, and start a project in such a way as to lead to a larger grant to support the same work. Preliminary data has been collected, and this will lead to a proposal Spring of 2012 with the National Endowment for the Humanities. This work is being done in conjunction with the Clemson Libraries, as I develop tools to scan personal collections shared with me by the research participants.

$5,000 from the Clemson Cyberinfrastructure Seed Grant program (2007)-Building Capacity for the Open Parks Grid. PI on this grant to support a conference to pull together the first partners for the Open Parks Grid Project. Conference was held in March of 2008 with the Southeast Region of the National Park Service and those interested from Clemson University.

$4,000 College of Health Education and Human Development research support (2008)-Understanding Wild hog release adjacent to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. PI for this project to develop an in-depth understanding as to the motivations of the hog hunting culture, specifically as it relates to unwanted transport and release of additional hogs in the region, so as to clearly define the social drivers for the illegal behavior.  Semi-structured interviews with local experts and the community were started in the fall of 2008.  Development of phase II is in process. This research has led to two presentations, one at a regional conference and one at a national conference. It is also in final preparation for a manuscript as well as expanded in a grant submitted to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, for $40,000 from Friends of the Smokies funding.

$7,000 College of Health Education and Human Development research support (2007)- Large-scale conservation planning: assessing potential for public resonance with the Northern Appalachian/Acadian Ecoregion "megasite" boundaries as developed by a consortium of scientists throughout region. PI on project researching three group meeting in the US and Canada about large-scale initiatives to conservation. This research led to a presentation at the Society for Conservation Biology conference in Chattanooga, TN in 2008 titled; Where does Conservation get Stuck? Then in 2010 this research led to a book chapter with Karen Beazeley chair of Ecosystem Management Department of Dalhousie University in Halifax Nova Scotia, and Conrad Reining of the Wildlands Group NGO, titled; Integrating Expert Judgment Into Systematic Ecoregional Conservation Planning.

Creative Inquiry-Undergraduate Research Projects
CO-PI for Departmental Undergraduate Research Program in PRTM. Overall management of CI-PRTM program with currently 18 undergraduate research projects in process, 8 close to completion, 10 at halfway mark, and 10-12 starting spring 2012.

Budget Spring 2010 - $12,000
Budget Fall 2010 - $12,000
Budget Spring 2011- $27,000
Budget Fall 2011 - $27,000 (18 groups)
Budget Spring 2011 - $30,000

Individually Managed Projects
$3,000 funds from Clemson University Creative Inquiry program (2011-2012). Increasing Diversity in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  This project is currently in its second semester of work to research the Hispanic population living directly adjacent to the Park as to their use, thoughts, intent to use, and barriers to using the Park. This project is being conducted in conjunction with Karen Ballentine a NPS ranger guiding the group to collect relevant, useful data to answer these pressing questions. The group is working on site at the western side of the park regularly.

$3,000 funds from Clemson University Creative Inquiry program (2011-2012). The users of the Clemson Experimental Forest. This project is currently in its second semester of work to research users of the Clemson Experimental Forest, and determine profile of who uses forest, how they use the forest, and amenities they are interested in seeing added to their experience in the Clemson Forest. They are using a new system to survey users on iPads called iSurvey.

$6,000 funds from Clemson University Creative Inquiry program (2010-2011), Primitive Camping in the Clemson Forest. This project is in fourth and final semester.  The funds supported a needs assessment research project, and construction of first primitive campsites in the Clemson Experimental Forest. 92010-2011)

$6,000 funds from Clemson University Creative Inquiry program (2010-2011), Primitive Picnic Shelter in the Clemson Forest. This project is in fourth and final semester.  The funds supported a needs assessment research project, and construction of first primitive campsites in the Clemson Experimental Forest. 92010-2011)

Un-Funded Research Projects
Writing on the Wall: Understanding the Meanings Associated with Graffiti in Parks and Protected Areas.  The purpose of this research is to gain insight to the meaning of graffiti in parks and protected areas in order to more fully understand the breadth of park user groups.  Assessing this in terms of a diversity of park users will allow managers to experiment with different types of management strategies to explore creative methods of mitigating unwanted behavior.

Courses Taught:
Graduate level
PRTM 900 Interdisciplinary Park and Protected Area Management
PRTM 801 Philosophy of Parks and Administration
PRTM 807 Recreation, Leisure and the Natural Environment
PRTM 813 Qualitative Research Methods

Undergraduate
PRTM 308 Leadership and Group Dynamics
PRTM 201 The Recreation Environment
PRTM 220 Conceptual Foundations of PRTM

  • PRTM Immersion- participated in the redesign of the PRTM undergraduate curriculum, and team teaching in the innovative IMMERSION program for all PRTM second-year students. Designed new destination for extended field experience in Chattanooga, TN
  • Designed Ethics project
  • Designed Learning Portfolio assignment
  • Designed week on leadership, management and facilities design and management
    Immersion/PRTM EDGE (team taught an immersive model of education the following 12 credits comprised of following courses) (PRTM 221 Delivery Systems; PRTM 222 Program and Event Planning; PRTM 223 Management of Parks and Recreation; PRTM 224 Legal Concepts of Parks and Recreation)

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