Northeastern University

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Chemical Engineering

Adam Ekenseair

Assistant Professor
Department of Chemical Engineering

Office: 213A Lake
Phone: 617.373-8742
a.ekenseair@neu.edu

Education:

  • B.S. (Chemical Engineering) University of Arkansas, 2005
  • Ph.D. (Chemical Engineering) University of Texas at Austin, 2010
  • Postdoctoral Research Associate (Bioengineering) Rice University, 2010-2013

Expertise:

  • Tissue Engineering
  • Polymer Science
  • 3-D Bioprinting
  • Biomaterials
  • Drug Delivery

Research Focus/Background:

The primary focus of my research is exploring the complex interplay between material composition, structural hierarchy, and biological response. The main goal of these efforts is to establish reliable techniques for both active and passive control of cell behavior by controlling matrix and scaffold composition and morphology in order to develop novel therapies for tissue regeneration and the treatment of disease.

Current efforts include the generation of 3D-printed scaffolds to direct tissue organization and repair in a spatiotemporal manner, the production of novel biopolymers for use as injectable, in situ forming tissue engineering scaffolds, and the pursuit of novel treatments for diseases of the bowel based on regenerative medicine.

Selected Publications:

  • “Perspectives on the Interface of Drug Delivery and Tissue Engineering.” A.K. Ekenseair, F.K. Kasper and A.G. Mikos. Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews, 65: 89-92 (2013).
  • “Structure-Property Evaluation of Thermally and Chemically Gelling Injectable Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering.” A.K. Ekenseair, K.W.M. Boere, S.N. Tzouanas, T.N. Vo, F.K. Kasper and A.G. Mikos. Biomacromolecules, 13: 2821-2830 (2012).
  • “Tuning the Transport Dynamics of Small Penetrant Molecules in Glassy Polymers.” A.K. Ekenseair, R.N. Seidel and N.A. Peppas. Polymer, 53(18): 4010-4017 (2012).
  • “Synthesis and Characterization of Thermally and Chemically Gelling Injectable Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering.” A.K. Ekenseair, K.W.M. Boere, S.N. Tzouanas, T.N. Vo, F.K. Kasper and A.G. Mikos. Biomacromolecules, 13: 1908-1915 (2012).
  • “Network Structure and Methanol Transport Dynamics in Poly(methyl methacrylate).” A.K. Ekenseair and N.A. Peppas. AIChE Journal, 58(5): 1600-1609 (2012).
  • “Visualization of Anomalous Penetrant Transport in Glassy Poly(methyl methacrylate) Utilizing High-Resolution X-ray Computed Tomography.” A.K. Ekenseair, R.A. Ketcham and N.A. Peppas. Polymer, 53(3): 776-781 (2011).
  • “Extraction of Hyperoside and Quercitrin from Mimosa (Albizia julibrissin) Foliage.” A.K. Ekenseair, L. Duan, D.J. Carrier, D.I. Bransby and E.C. Clausen. Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology, 129-132: 382-91 (2006).

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