Oct. 20, 2014 | Volume XXII, Issue 10

Professors Mashburn, Nunn, and Slobogin authors in AALS symposium issue

Published: June 5th, 2000

Category: News

In the past few years, the legal profession and legal academia have placed increasing emphasis on professional ethics. Representative of that trend, the American Association of Law Schools in January sponsored a special half-day panel discussion on criminal justice ethics involving more than 15 law professors, and Fordham Law Review devoted an entire volume to publication of the resulting papers. Three Levin College of Law faculty members were featured in the April 2000 volume of the Review. Professor Christopher Slobogin participated in the planning of the symposium and, with Professor Amy Mashburn, co-authored “The Criminal Defense Lawyer’s Fiduciary Duty to Clients with Mental Disability.” Using the Unabomber case and other recent cases as springboards, Professors Slobogin and Mashburn explored the difficult ethical dilemmas faced by defense attorneys with mentally ill clients, such as Ted Kaczynski, who refused to go along with his attorneys’ insanity defense strategy even though faced with capital charges stemming from bombs he sent through the mail. An authority on Civil Procedure, Professional Responsibility and Administrative Law, Professor Amy Mashburn joined the UF faculty in 1990. She was formerly an associate with Dean, Mead, Egerton, Bloodworth, Capouano & Bozarth in Orlando. Associate Dean for Law Center Affairs Kenneth Nunn wrote “The ‘Darden Dilemma’: Should African Americans Prosecute Crimes?” in the Review. Nunn is a published author and speaker on Criminal Law and Procedure, Race Relations, Civil Rights, Public Interest Law, Critical Race Theory, Legal Semiotics, Sociology of Law, and Law and Cultural Studies. He has served on the faculty of UF and Washington & Lee University; as an attorney with the D.C. Public Defender Service and the Southern Africa Project of the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law; and as a Deputy Public Defender, San Francisco. He is working on a chapter for a book on police brutality and an article on racism for the World Book Encyclopedia, and will teach a course this summer on international criminal law for the UF Study Abroad Program at the University of Cape Town, South Africa. Professor Christopher Slobogin, who holds the Stephen C. O’Connell Chair and is an Affiliate Professor of Psychiatry, is a prolific writer, frequent speaker at symposiums, universities and other prominent venues in this country and others in the areas of criminal and mental health law, and has been a visiting professor at USC, Virginia and other law schools. Since January, he has published the fourth edition of his treatise with Professor Charles Whitebread, Criminal Procedure, and articles in California Criminal Law Review, Mental and Physical Disability Law Reporter; and a symposium issue of Psychology, Public Policy and Law; and is now working on his book, Minding Justice: Depriving People with Mental Disability of Life and Liberty.

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