Oct. 20, 2014 | Volume XXII, Issue 10

News Briefs February 21, 2011

Published: February 21st, 2011

Category: News Briefs

UF Law Trial Team Exhibition takes place Thursday
In celebration of the Martin H. Levin Advocacy Center Courtroom Opening, the University of Florida Fredric G. Levin College of Law Trial Team will host an exhibition on Feb. 24 at 2 p.m. in the courtroom. Judge Paul Huck, U.S. Federal District Court Judge in Miami, will preside over the case of People v. Livingston, where the defendant is charged with one count of involuntary manslaughter and one count of assault with a dangerous weapon. The advocates making their case are Anita McNulty (2L), Dan Hogan (3L), Rhett Parker (3L) and Mike Quintero (3L). The witnesses in the case are played by Georgia Buckhalter (2L) and James Baley (3L). Special thanks to Daniella Chacoa (2L), Tiana Beaudouin (2L) and Gillian Sykes (2L), who helped the advocates prepare. The event is free and all are invited to attend.

All seven Florida Supreme Court justices to judge Maguire Appellate Advocacy Competition on Friday
The law school community is invited to watch as members of the Florida Moot Court Team, (pictured at right), showcase their oral advocacy skills to all seven members of the Florida Supreme Court on Friday. The 27th annual Maguire Appellate Advocacy Competition, formerly known as the Raymer F. Maguire Moot Court Final Four Competition, will be held at 10 a.m. in UF Law’s Martin H. Levin Advocacy Center Courtroom. The event is free and open to the public — the law school community is encouraged to attend. The exhibition allows moot court team members to receive useful critiques regarding their oral arguments as they prepare for the American Bar Association’s National Appellate Advocacy Competition. This year’s team consists of Wilbert Vancol (3L), Leah Edelman (3L), Katie Tinsley (3L), David Hughes (3L), David Evans (3L) and Monica Haddad (2L). During the exhibition, Vancol and Edelman will present arguments for Petitioner, and Haddad and Evans will argue for Respondent. The Maguire exhibition provides UF Law students a unique opportunity to observe these outstanding law students exhibit their oral advocacy skills. Providing critiques for the oral arguments will be the justices of the Florida Supreme Court: Chief Justice Charles T. Canady, Justice Barbara J. Pariente, Justice R. Fred Lewis, Justice Peggy A. Quince, Justice Ricky Polston, Justice Jorge Labarga (JD 79) and Justice James E.C. Perry. First-year law students interested in being a part of the Florida Moot Court Team are highly encouraged to attend the Maguire Competition to see the team in action. Additionally, the team will hold a question and answer session for all interested 1Ls Wednesday, March 2, at noon. Pizza will be provided at the session, and 1Ls will have the opportunity to ask questions about the Florida Moot Court Team, the try-out process and general appellate advocacy issues. For questions regarding the information session, please contact Jennifer Sharp.

Faculty scholarship & activities
Last week, Professor Mark Fenster discussed conspiracy theories in a radio interview; Professor Gugliuzza was a panelist in a recent Washington, D.C., panel looking at court decisions; Professor Amy Mashburn talked about a class action lawsuit; Professor McMahon was published in Tax Notes; Dean Emeritus Jon Mills was appointed to an ABA task force and the results of a CGR study are referenced in an article on Florida Main Street programs.
Faculty scholarship & activities »

UF Law’s Center on Children & Families co-hosts presentations on collaborative and therapeutic family law
Barry Law Review and UF Law Center on Children and Families will host “Collaborative and Therapeutic Family Law: Theory and Practice” Friday, March 11, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Orlando. Area and state experts will offer their expertise. To register, contact Debbie Willis willisd@law.ufl.edu or 352-273-0613 by Feb. 22 and fill out this form.

Submit art for Sixth Annual UF Law Student/Faculty Art Show by March 14
Mark your calendars for the upcoming UF Law Student/Faculty Art Show Wednesday, March 16, in the Legal Information Center at 7 p.m. The Art Law Society will have a silent auction for selected works and all proceeds will benefit Shands Arts in Medicine program. There also will be wine, food and live music. If you are interested in submitting your artwork, send the following information to f.c.tripp@gmail.com by March 14 at 5 p.m.: title, artist’s name, date created, dimensions of the work/length of video, medium (i.e., oil on canvas, photography, etc) and whether you would like to donate the work for the silent auction.

CSRRR hosts Harvard Professor Charles Ogletree Thursday, March 24
The Center for the Study of Race and Race Relations presents its spring lecture with Charles J. Ogletree, Jesse Climenko Professor of Law and director of the Charles Hamilton, Houston Institute for Race and Justice, Harvard University. The lecture takes place at noon, March 24, in Chesterfield Smith Ceremonial Classroom (HOL 180) with a reception and book signing at 1 p.m. Ogletree will discuss his book, The Presumption of Guilt: The Arrest of Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and Race, Class and Crime in America (Palgrave Macmillan 2010). This event is free and open to the public. For more information, visit http://www.law.ufl.edu/centers/csrrr/events.shtml.

‘Coffee with the Dean’ resumes Wednesday
Dean Robert Jerry will resume a program he has hosted for several years called “Coffee with the Dean” Wednesday, Feb. 23, at 9 a.m. Up to 15 students can sign up, first-come, first-served, to meet him in the Faculty Dining Room for coffee and doughnuts. He will have three sessions this semester and each will last about an hour. If you have concerns, questions, a compliment about a member of the faculty or staff, or topics you would like to discuss with the dean, please sign-up by sending an e-mail to Ellen Robinson at robinsone@law.ufl.edu. In addition, the John Marshall Bar Association will host another Town Hall meeting Wednesday, March 30, at noon in the Chesterfield Smith Ceremonial Classroom (HOL 180).

Law student to publish work in e-book, assume editorship of the Global Journal of Peer Review
After graduation, Eric N. Grosch (3L) will publish Clinical-Performance Peer-Review: The Triumph of Fallacy, a work unique in its scientific, logical, legal and philosophical treatment of its medical topic. It contains: (1) proof that clinical-performance peer-review, as practiced, cannot generate reliable findings and that it is counterproductive of its claimed purpose, to maintain and improve quality of clinical care. (2) Evidence that, for clinical-performance peer-review, courts disregard proper legal principles and logic to which they adhere in other cases. (3) Evidence that state legislatures and Congress have produced misguided laws, establishing clinical-performance peer-review-based on no evidence of its efficacy in maintaining or improving quality of clinical care or of its accuracy in identifying good or errant physicians or in distinguishing them. (4) Solutions to enable decision-makers to avoid pitfalls and to found the healthcare-system on principles that fulfill its clinical mission. (5) Defense tactics against bad-faith peer-review.

Princeton Review seeks input from law students
The Princeton Review has once again named the University of Florida Levin College of Law one of the best law schools in the nation. Distinguished schools will be profiled in the 2012 edition of Best Law Schools. In order to help them represent UF Law accurately, please fill out the following survey to author a new “Students Say” profile and update our ratings.

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