Nov. 17, 2014 | Volume XXII, Issue 14

Faculty Scholarship & Activities

Published: September 23rd, 2013

Category: News

Bob Dekle
Director, Criminal Prosecution Clinic; Assistant Director, Criminal Justice Center; Master Lecturer

“Vigilante case highlights debate over rights of crime victims” (Sept. 17, 2013, Sun-Sentinel)

Dekle commented in this article that raises the legal question of whether or not one can defend his or her property when they believe the wrong person is the culprit. A 17-year-old boy was mistakenly identified as a burglar, chased and threatened with a bat, then had his keys and wallet taken. The couple who chased the boy were originally charged with felonies which were later dropped because they were defending their property with non-deadly force – even though they had the wrong person.

From the article:
Bob Dekle, a University of Florida law professor, said the right to make a so-called citizen’s arrest exists across the country. However, such a move is fraught with peril and could result in a person being charged with battery or false imprisonment — or worse.

“The first risk I can think of is getting yourself killed,” Dekle said. “The second risk is that you might run up on an unsympathetic police officer and get arrested, then [be faced with] an unsympathetic prosecutor and finally an unsympathetic judge. And then you could really be in deep trouble.”

Dekle said that state laws surrounding defense of property are open to interpretation, which means each case is treated differently by prosecutors across the state.

Lyrissa Lidsky
Professor of Law; Stephen C. O’Connell Chair; Associate Dean for International Studies

UF Law School Officials Wary Of Two-Year Law Degree” (Sept. 10, 2013, WUFT.org)

President Obama argued that law school should be reduced to two years as a way to save students money. Many law school boards will not agree with eliminating the third year. UF Law professors are also unsure about these changes.

From the article:
Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky, professor of law at UF’s Levin College of Law, said she believes that all three years of law school are necessary as the practice of law continues to become more complex.

Lidsky suggests law school could be made more affordable by allowing students to earn a combined undergraduate and law degree in six years.

“Students would begin focusing on their legal studies earlier,” Lidsky said. “But they would still have three full years of legal training.”

Kenneth Nunn
Professor o­­f Law; Associate Director, Center on Children and Families; Assistant Director, Criminal Justice Center

UF Law School Officials Wary Of Two-Year Law Degree” (Sept. 10, 2013, WUFT.org)

President Obama argued that law school should be reduced to two years as a way to save students money. Many law school boards will not agree with eliminating the third year. UF Law professors are also unsure about these changes.

From the article:
Kenneth B. Nunn, professor of law at the University of Florida’s Levin College of Law, is not opposed to Obama’s idea, as long as students are still obtaining a quality education.

“This means that students must be taught the theory behind the law and not just how to practice it,” Nunn said.

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