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Good Dental Habits Emphasized During Children’s Oral Health Month

Tue, 02/02/2016 - 13:42

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 3, 2016) — Parents and caregivers are urged to take a moment to pause and talk to children about the importance of good oral health and make sure good dental habits are being formed during National Children’s Oral Health Month.

“More people are beginning to understand that good dental health is linked to good overall health," said Dr. Enrique Bimstein, chief of the Division of Oral Health Pediatric Dentistry  at the University of Kentucky College of Dentistry. "But we still have work to do around helping people understand that good habits need to be formed early in life.”

Some people believe primary, or “baby” teeth are not very important. However, primary teeth have significant jobs to do, including helping children chew and speak and holding space for permanent teeth, he said.

"A healthy mouth helps keep a child healthy overall," Bimstein said. "Dental pain, from something like a toothache, can be very distracting in a classroom setting and may require children to miss school time in order to receive necessary treatment. If left untreated, problems can sometimes lead to more serious infections, placing a child at risk for larger health problems."

Bimstein provides a few oral health reminders:

·         Brush two minutes, two times a day with fluoride toothpaste.

·         Floss daily to help reach where brushing misses.

·         Schedule a child’s first dental visit no later than age 1 year old, and schedule regular checkups following their first visit.

“With proper care, a balanced diet, and regular dental visits, children’s primary teeth can remain healthy and strong — helping to maintain their overall health,” said Bimstein.

To celebrate National Children’s Oral Health Month, UK Oral Health will be providing free children’s dental supplies, while supplies last, on Thursdays in February. More information is available at dentistry.uky.edu/pediatric. 

Media Contact: Ann Blackford at 859-323-6442 or ann.blackford@uky.edu 

A Day in the Life of a UK Student: Feb. 3, 1912

Tue, 02/02/2016 - 12:38

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 3, 2016) — In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 163rd diary entry from Feb. 3, 1912, recalls getting her picture taken for the university’s yearbook, The Kentuckian. Later that evening, McClure cheered on the women’s basketball team against Somerset and assisted in hosting a dance for the opposing team.

Feb. 3rd. Have my picture taken in the morning, and go to the game in the snow in the afternoon. Adeline feeds us cough drops while the girls beat Somerset 19-4. Have a dance for visitors after supper, and the referee comes into the dance hall! Addie and I take to the tall timber and fail to see the escape.

More on Virginia Clay McClure

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish. 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.

The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.

McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.

The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots.

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

UK Celebrates Black History Month

Tue, 02/02/2016 - 09:19

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 2, 2016) — The University of Kentucky celebrates African American History Month with at least 16 scheduled events, many sponsored and developed by the Martin Luther King Center.

The series features a visit with actress Tatyana Ali and music executive Amir Windom. They will discuss control of self image, women's empowerment, academic destiny and self-awareness Feb. 10. The campus will have the opportunity to converse with Provost Tim Tracy as well as open discussions about issues such as colorism, America’s racial climate, racial battle fatigue and health disparities. An evening of fun and fellowship is also included with the Underground Formal hosted by the Student Activities Board, Underground Perspective, the MLK Center and the Office of LGBTQ* on Feb. 19.

All events are free and open to the public. For more information contact the MLK Center at 257-4130.

Tuesday, Feb. 2

12:30 p.m.

VIP Center, Frazee Hall

VIP Talk Back Tuesdays: Cliff Huxtable vs. Bill Cosby

Wednesday, Feb.3

7 p.m.

White Hall Classroom Building, room 106

NPHC 101: The Divine 9 organizations will give an informational presentation on their organization, intake, how to join, etc. This meeting is mandatory for those wanting to join this semester.

Feb. 9

12:30 p.m.

VIP Center

VIP Talk-Back Tuesdays: Myth of the Magical Black Women

Feb. 10

Noon

Blazer Hall, room 313

Lunch & Learn: A Conversation with UK Provost Tim Tracy

Feb. 10

Noon

White Hall Classroom Building, 102

BSU general body meeting and discussion on colorism.

Feb. 10

7 p.m.

Memorial Hall

Progression Towards Success. Tatyana Ali and Amir Windom will speak about control of self image, women's empowerment, academic destiny and self-awareness.

Feb. 16

12:30 p.m.

VIP Center

VIP Talk-Back Tuesdays: What is Black Masculinity?

Feb. 17

Noon

King Center, 313 Blazer Hall

Food for Thought

Feb. 17

5:30 p.m.

Woodland Glen V Community Room

An inter-professional panel discussion about combating health disparities in diverse communities.

Feb. 19

8-11 p.m.

Commonwealth Stadium, Mezzanine Level

SAB Underground Formal: Join SAB and Underground Perspective along with the MLK Center and the Office of LGBTQ* Resources for a night of dancing, mingling and fun at the SAB Underground Formal.

Feb. 23

12: 30 p.m.

VIP Center

VIP Talk-Back Tuesdays: Racial Battle Fatigue

Feb. 23

Noon

King Center, 313 Blazer Hall

Food for Thought

Feb. 24

6 p.m.

White Hall Classroom Building, 118

BSU Progressive Dinner

A brief road of history, starting with Lyman T. Johnson

RSVP required. Contact MLK Center

Feb. 25

6 p.m.

White Hall Classroom Building, 334

Family Feud: Black History Edition, origins of Black History Month

Feb. 28

7 p.m.

Memorial Hall

Movie: “Do the Right Thing and School Daze”

Feb. 29

6:30 p.m.

Singletary Center Recital Hall

Town Hall Discussion on Racial Climate

UK Black Graduate and Professional Student Association in collaboration with Social Justice Advocacy Group

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

The Food Connection Now Accepting Proposals for Student Opportunity Grants

Tue, 02/02/2016 - 08:59

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 3, 2016) — The Food Connection, through an agreement with University of Kentucky Dining, has oversight of endowment income intended for the enrichment of student opportunities in the study of food and food systems. The endowment income — at the present, approximately $50,000 — will be awarded through a grant program for undergraduate and graduate students.

Last year, 12 proposals were selected that best fit the mission of The Food Connection. Each project showed strong potential impact on the community, developed solutions and creative strategies, and encompassed a vibrant, healthy and sustainable food economy.

Faculty, staff or students may submit projects in nutrition, food technology, food in culture and food production. Some funded projects in 2015 included New Roots in Lexington, a partnership between food desert communities and Kentucky farmers, and "Food Pathways in Ancient and Modern Times," a course about tracking plants and animals from ancient to modern day.

For proposals to be considered, a UK faculty or professional staff member must lead the project and guide the student(s). A maximum of $5,000 is offered per student and grants benefiting multiple students can receive up to $10,000.

With this opportunity, The Food Connection requests applications that will advance experimental education, community participation, student research and professional development. The program is open to all majors at UK and everyone with ideas visibly related to food or food systems is encouraged to apply.

Student Opportunity Grant proposals are due March 7. The grant application can be found here. Please email all proposals and questions to mssmith@uky.edu.

To keep up with the latest going on at The Food Connection, follow @UKyFood on Twitter.

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, 859-257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

UK Center Releases Report on Kentucky's Economy

Mon, 02/01/2016 - 16:12

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 2, 2016) — Highlighting the importance of education to Kentucky’s economy in both good and bad economic times, the Center for Business and Economic Research (CBER) — the applied economic research branch of the Gatton College of Business and Economics at the University of Kentucky — released its 44th Kentucky Annual Economic Report today.

The report is one of the many ways CBER fulfills its mandated mission as specified in the Kentucky Revised Statutes to examine various aspects of the Kentucky economy. CBER performs research projects for federal, state, and local government agencies, as well as for private-sector and nonprofit clients nationwide. 

“The annual economic report contains a vast amount of information about the state’s economy that can be used by business leaders, policymakers and citizens to become better informed on economic issues,” said Gatton College Dean David Blackwell.

The report covers a variety of issues ranging from an economic forecast for Kentucky in 2016 to a comprehensive presentation of agricultural, community, economic, economic security, education, energy, environment, health, infrastructure, innovation, population, and public finance factors affecting Kentucky’s future economic prosperity. As a result, Christopher Bollinger, Gatton Endowed Professor of Economics and CBER director, says, “The annual report will appeal to a broad spectrum of individuals — from business leaders to concerned citizens.”

Bollinger is the author of the report’s 2016 Kentucky economic forecast, and he is “guardedly optimistic” about Kentucky’s economic prospects this year due to the uncertainly surrounding several economic trends.

“It has been a long road to recovery,” Bollinger said. “The state lost 119,000 jobs from the peak of the last economic expansion in December 2007 to the darkest days of February 2010 when Kentucky’s unemployment rate peaked at nearly 11 percent,” he notes. Since then employment levels have improved and in November 2015 Kentucky’s unemployment rate was estimated to be 4.9 percent. Bollinger anticipates it will hold steady and is forecasting an unemployment rate for Kentucky in 2016 below 5 percent.

In addition to the economic forecast, there are more than 100 trends, forces and factors affecting Kentucky’s economy presented in the report. This includes a recently completed analysis looking at the benefits of education for both the individual and the broader community and society; new research results on Kentucky’s educational position relative to other states as well as an assessment of our educational return on investment; an update of the center’s county-level assessment of broadband utilization; and a comprehensive look at state finances and an estimate of Kentucky’s structural deficit. In short, the report provides new and important information, data, and analysis on Kentucky’s economic situation.

The breadth of the annual report reflects the diversity of the collaborators who worked with CBER to produce it — including the Innovation Network for Entrepreneurial Thinking or iNET, which is organized and staffed by the College of Communication and Information, and the Von Allmen Center for Entrepreneurship, which is part of the Gatton College.

According to CBER Director Bollinger, “We have produced an annual report that paints a diverse and complicated picture of our state’s economy, its communities, and its citizens. Despite the constant change confronting us, there are timeless and enduring lessons. Pursuing educational excellence as well as economic innovation — since ideas, innovation, and intellectual capital form the foundation of the knowledge economy — is essential for Kentucky to improve its per capita income and achieve broad prosperity.”

Digital copies of the Center for Business and Economic Research 2016 Annual Economic Report can be obtained at the CBER website at http://cber.uky.edu or by calling 859-257-2912 or sending an email to michael.childress@uky.edu.

MEDIA CONTACTS: Carl Nathe, 859-257-3200/carl.nathe@uky.edu;

Ann Mary Quarandillo, 859-257-0750/annmary.q@uky.edu.

UK Family Center Offers Free Relationship Checkups

Mon, 02/01/2016 - 15:45

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 2, 2016) — Relationships need the proper attention and care to function properly just like many other things in our lives. Visiting a doctor regularly is necessary to maintain a healthy body, just as routine maintenance is key to keep a car running.

As Valentine's Day approaches, the University of Kentucky Family Center is offering free relationship checkups to the Lexington community. These checkups are available for married couples, couples who are dating, engaged and/or living together, as well as gay and lesbian couples. The sessions take place Feb. 10-16 from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m and are free of charge.

A relationship checkup can be arranged by calling the UK Family Center at 859-257-7755, or by visiting the website at familycenter.uky.edu .The Family Center is located on the second floor of Scovell Hall on UK's campus.

“The relationship checkups seek to strengthen the relationship by finding out what you are doing right and helping the couple become even stronger by building on that instead of focusing on the negatives," said UK Family Center Director Tracey Werner-Wilson.

The UK Family Center suggests that everyone in a relationship should take advantage of these services, and not just couples who feel they are struggling in their relationship.

"Just like everyone needs a six-month checkup at the dentist to help keep their teeth healthy, so too everyone in a romantic relationship benefits from a relationship checkup," Werner-Wilson said.

Appointments usually last one hour. Couples fill out a questionnaire, which is reviewed by an intern therapist. The answers, in conjunction with conversation with the couple, allow the intern to coach the couple on what they are doing well and help them figure out areas of disagreement.

Intern therapists are master's students who are working to become licensed marriage and family therapists through UK's fully accredited Couple and Family Therapy Program. Within 16 months, these interns must log 500 hours of client contact. Interns are supervised and instructed three-four hours a week by a licensed marriage and family therapist.

To meet this demand for clients, the Family Center offers low-cost services to UK, Lexington, and surrounding communities. Utilizing a sliding scale fee, the Family Center works with clients to make therapy affordable for those who need it.

"Not only does it help our students attain the practice hours they need, but we see it as the service arm of UK's mission statement. This helps the students see the relationship as a client, and not an individual person. We are helping all Kentuckians create a better life for themselves. We are improving the lives of Kentuckians, which creates an attractive place for people to live," Werner-Wilson said.

The UK Family Center first opened its doors in 1988, serving families, couples, and individuals alike. Common needs addressed by the Family Center include stress, relationship issues, parent-child conflict, behavioral issues in children, anxiety, and depression. Additionally, play therapy is offered to families with young children.

The focus of family science is to help understand and improve the lives of individuals, working with the roles that family and interpersonal relationships perform in shaping one's experiences.

"We believe lasting change happens within relationships. As humans, we do not live in a vacuum. We are constantly in a relationship with someone, not always a romantic relationship. Sometimes these relationships try to sabotage us when we try to change. If we include those relationships within the therapy sessions, they can become a support for change instead of fighting against change," Werner-Wilson said.

MEDIA CONTACT: Terrance Wade, 859-257-8716; terrance.wade@uky.edu.

Staff Senate to Hold Information Session for Prospective Trustee Candidates

Mon, 02/01/2016 - 15:34

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 2, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Staff Senate will host an informational session from 11:30 a.m.-12:45 p.m. on Feb. 11 at the W.T. Young Gallery for those interested in running for the position of staff representative to the UK Board of Trustees.

The intent of this drop-in session is to provide potential candidates with information about the requirements to stand for election, campaign rules, expected time commitments, and professional obligations of a trustee.

During the information session, the president’s chief of staff, Bill Swinford, will be available to answer questions about the obligations of the position as well as how the service of a staff member on the UK Board is handled in terms of university policy.

The nomination period for the position runs from April 7-21, and campaigning takes place May 2-27. The voting period for staff will be May 13-27, with the announcement of election results on June 6.

All documents, including the official guidelines, nomination form and petition in support, and timeline may be accessed beginning Thursday, April 7, at http://www.uky.edu/staffsenate/ under “What’s Happening” by clicking on “2016 Election for Staff Representative to the Board of Trustees” for prospective candidates. 

Sheila Brothers, the current staff representative, said the position has been a rewarding experience for her, but it does require a solid time commitment to fulfill the obligations.

“Even though I’ve been employed here for 20 years, being staff trustee offers me opportunities to learn new things about UK on a regular basis," Brothers said. "Trustee-related activities can take up to about one-quarter of my 40-hour work week, and those activities run the gamut from formal business meetings to spontaneous conversations. It is important to give that role the time and attention it requires.”

The election of a staff representative to the UK Board is described in the Governing Regulations of UK and Kentucky Revised Statues, section 164.131. The staff representative is elected for a three-year term. Any full time UK staff member is eligible to run for the position with the exception of the president, vice presidents, academic deans, and academic department chairs.

As described by statute, the staff representative is elected for a 3-year term and represents all non-teaching university employees. Staff with an FTE greater than or equal to .75 at UK are eligible to vote in this election. 

For more information, contact Ann Eads ( aeads2@uky.edu) of the Staff Senate Elections Committee.

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

"see blue." #selfie: Austin Mullen

Mon, 02/01/2016 - 15:14

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 2, 2016) — Want to get to know the people behind some of the biggest student leadership positions on campus? We did, too! That's why we're excited to introduce "see blue." #selfie  a brand new series on UKNow that lets student leaders from across campus tell us a little bit more about themselves and their organizations. Today meet SGA President Austin Mullen.

Austin Mullen, a senior finance, marketing and business management major from La Grange, Kentucky, serves as the 2015-16 University of Kentucky Student Government Association president and the student representative to the Board of Trustees. We sat down with Mullen to get to know the true student leader behind the SGA title. This genuine, charming and driven leader relays his passion for the 'Cats, the student body and for the university in his "see blue." #selfie!

UKNow: When did you become involved with Student Government Association?

Austin Mullen: I learned about SGA my freshman year through the Leadership Development Program, and then I was elected as a freshman senator as well. I decided at summer advising before freshman year that I wanted to be involved with SGA when I spoke to the SGA president at the time, Stephen Bilas, and became interested in what the organization did.

UK: Why are you so passionate about the organization? 

AM: I am passionate about SGA because I think that it is part of the university that can connect students with administration in order to positively impact the university as a whole.

UK: What has been the most surprising issue you've heard repeatedly from students? 

AM: The issue of diversity and inclusion. I think that I have been able to see how so many students come from so many different walks of life. I think that our institution is at a good position with diversity and inclusion, but I still think we have room for improvement to ensure each student feels like UK is home.

UK: What is your most frequently used emoji?

AM: The crying tears laughing one … no, no, no … the 100 percent one … actually both.

UK: Are there any other organizations on campus that you're involved in?

AM: I've been involved in SGA, Sigma Chi, DanceBlue, Wrap Up America, Scholars in Engineering and Management, Honors Program and Campus Outreach.

UK: What's one word you're guilty of using too often? 

AM: The GOAT. Which means the "greatest of all time."

UK: Growing up, what did you want to be? 

AM: The director of Athletics for UK. I actually told my mom at the age of 8 that is what I wanted to be.

UK: What is your current Netflix series?

AM: I have watched Netflix two times in my life: "House of Cards" and "Making a Murderer." I still can't decide who made the murder.

UK: How dedicated are you to UK basketball?

AM: Well I've never taken part in the State Street scene because I have been to the 2014 Sweet Sixteen, Elite Eight, Final Four and the National Championship. Last year I went to the Round of 64, Round of 32, Elite 8 and the Final Four. Pretty dedicated.

UK: What is one thing you remember from your campus tour when you were in high school? 

AM: My mom would not let me submit my application to UK until I took a campus tour even though I knew I was going to UK. William T. Young Library was the most memorable part though because, as Dr. Mary Lynne Capilouto, would say it's a "sanctuary for learning."

UK: Since you've been at UK while we have undergone this major transformation, what new facility are you most impressed with?

AM: The renovation of Gatton because it turned an outdated building into a state-of-the-art educational facility with areas for community to be made. 

UK: Since you have the opportunity work one-on-one with a lot of UK administrators, what is one specific administrator you look up to? 

AM: I am very grateful for the opportunity to work with administration, and I sincerely believe that each of them has an interest of students as first priority. However, one I really admire is Eric Monday due to his ability to connect and serve students. All that he has done during his three years here he has done with honesty and integrity that upholds through his work.

UK: Which team are you rooting for in this year's SuperBowl on Sunday? 

AM: The Denver Broncos because of the UK alumnus Danni Trevathan and Peyton Manning because he's the GOAT.

UK: What would you tell an incoming freshman? 

AM: Get involved! I have learned just as much, if not more, through my involvement as I have in the classroom.

"see blue." #selfies will appear every other Tuesday on UKNow. Know a student leader we should feature? Contact Rebecca Stratton at rebecca.stratton@uky.edu to nominate someone.

David Horohov Leads UK's Renowned Gluck Center

Mon, 02/01/2016 - 14:36

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 2, 2015) — The University of Kentucky's   College of Agriculture, Food and Environment is home to the world-renowned Gluck Equine Research Center.

The director of the center is David Horohov, who also carries the titles of Jes E. and Clementine M. Schlaikjer Endowed Chair at Gluck, and chair of UK's Department of Veterinary Science.

In a recent interview appearance on 'UK at the Half,' Horohov spoke about his research interests past and present, and goals for the future of the Gluck Center.

'UK at the Half' airs during the live radio broadcasts of each UK basketball and football game on the UK Sports Network, which covers Kentucky and contiguous areas. The segments are hosted by Carl Nathe of UK Public Relations and Marketing.

Listen to the 'UK at the Half' featuring Horohov below, or click here.

MEDIA CONTACT: Carl Nathe, 859-257-3200; carl.nathe@uky.edu.

A Day in the Life of a UK Student: Feb. 2, 1912

Mon, 02/01/2016 - 14:07

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 2, 2016) — In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 162nd diary entry from Feb. 2, 1912, recalls the stress McClure felt while juggling her membership of the Cap and Gown Committee and a German course on top of day-to-day tasks of being a college student.

Feb. 2nd. I find great difficulty in being in Cap and Gown Committee meeting and German class at once. Dismiss German early and adjourn to Y.M.C.A room. We order caps and gowns. Mr. Cary, Mr. Kohn, and I talk over past, present, and future and decide to come back next year. Come back and clean the room, take a trip to Warren's, etc. While Addie goes to T.B.II and Preps have a party in the dance hall, I write "Much Ado About Nothing."

More on Virginia Clay McClure

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish. 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.

The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.

McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.

The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots.

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Opera Symposium Explores Representations of Race

Mon, 02/01/2016 - 13:53

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 2, 2016) — An upcoming symposium presented by the University of Kentucky Opera Research Alliance aims to explore African-American representations in opera. "Confronting America’s Racial Past through Opera" will be held 3:30–5:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 5, in the Niles Gallery of the Lucille C. Little Fine Arts Library and Learning Center on the UK campus. The symposium is free and open to the public.

Co-sponsored by the UK School of Music and the UK Division of Musicology and Ethnomusicology, the symposium will feature presentations by graduate students in musicology, ethnomusicology and vocal performance. The doctoral student speakers and their topics are:

· musicology student Kaylina Madison, of Murfreesboro, Tennessee, on Louis Gruenberg’s "The Emperor Jones," an adaptation of Eugene O’Neill’s 1920 play of the same title, at 3:30 p.m.;

· ethnomusicology student Nathaniel Lucy, of Toledo, Ohio, on "Many Thousand Gone," an opera that portrays the tragedy of a real-life Missouri lynching, at 4 p.m.;

· vocal performance student Iris Fordjour-Hankins, of Gross Pointe Woods, Michigan, on the story of Kentucky slave Margaret Garner in Richard Danielpour’s opera "Margaret Garner," set to a libretto by Toni Morrison, author of "Beloved," at 4:30 p.m.; and

· musicology student Kathryn Caton, of Lexington, on the representation of Martin Luther King Jr. in Philip Glass’s opera, "Satyagraha," at 5 p.m.

The following week, Bruce D. McClung, associate professor of musicology and division head of composition, musicology and theory at the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music, will present "From the Lower East Side to Catfish Row: 'Strawberries!' as Cultural Mediation in 'Porgy and Bess' Street Scene," which will begin 3:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 12. This talk is also free and open to the public.

Bruce McClung is a musicologist whose interests include American music, musical theater, mass entertainment, manuscript studies and critical editing. His research appears in Theater, The Kurt Weill Newsletter, "Reader’s Guide to Music: History, Theory, and Criticism," Pipers Enzklopädie des Musiktheaters: Oper, Operette, Musical, Ballet and The Grove Dictionary of American Music (2d ed.); the collections "A Stranger Here Myself: Kurt Weill Studien" and the "Cambridge Companion to the Musical"; and the New York Public Library’s iPad app "Biblion: The Boundless Library."

McClung is the author of the award-winning book "Lady in the Dark: Biography of a Musical" (Oxford University Press). He is also editor of the two-volume critical edition of "Lady in the Dark" for the Kurt Weill Edition, and served as the musical and text consultant for the Royal National Theatre’s production of that musical play. He has received an American Musicological Society Alvin H. Johnson AMS 50 Fellowship and a National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Stipend Award. McClung is currently writing a monograph titled "The World of Tomorrow: Music and the New York World’s Fair 1939/40."

For more information about the symposium or McClung's lecture, contact Diana Hallman, associate professor of musicology and coordinator of the UK Opera Research Alliance, by email to diana.hallman@uky.edu.

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Do You Know Your Numbers? Make Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Choices During American Heart Month

Mon, 02/01/2016 - 13:45

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 2, 2016) — It's National Heart Month — a good time to think more deeply about your health and how to make heart-healthy lifestyle choices.

“More people know about heart health now than they did 20 years ago," said Dr. Gretchen Wells, director of Women's Heart Health at the Gill Heart Institute. "But we still have a lot of work to do, especially with women, whose symptoms can be different than men's.”

Many believe that heart health involves strenuous tasks and countless hours at the gym. But just 30 minutes of exercise five out of seven days a week can reduce heart attack risk by up to 50 percent.

"You can kill two birds with one stone by doing a few simple tasks around the house," Wells said. "Even a little bit of physical activity can have a big benefit on your health. "

According to the Calorie Control Council, activities such as dusting or vacuuming can burn up to 216 calories in the comfort of your home.

Dr. Wells provides a few reminders to begin living heart-healthy:

·      Be active for at least 30 minutes a day

·      Choose foods that are low in sodium and saturated fat

·      Take steps to quit smoking

·      Know your numbers.  If your blood glucose (sugar), cholesterol, blood pressure, and/or BMI are abnormal, get treatment.

Wells cautions that you should always check with your doctor before beginning an exercise routine. "They know your health status and can help you tailor a program that fits into your needs and your schedule -- both of which are important factors for success."

Spring Break Ride Home Express Tickets Now Available

Mon, 02/01/2016 - 10:22

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 2, 2016) — University of Kentucky Parking and Transportation Services (PTS) is now selling tickets for the Spring Break edition of its Ride Home Express bus service. The PTS Ride Home Express is a bus service traveling to hometowns and other destinations during the major academic breaks. The service, which is in its sixth year of operation, provides an economical and efficient alternative as compared to other means of travel.

The Spring Break Ride Home Express will leave campus Friday, March 11, and return Sunday, March 20. For the 2016 Spring Break edition of the Ride Home Express, PTS will only operate the Chicago route, which serves five stops. Fares for the PTS Ride Home Express range from $55-$155 for round-trip rates; one-way fares begin at $30.

Ride Home Express is open to both students and employees. UK students and employees are able to register and pay for their trip via the Web by logging on to the Parking Account Manager with their Link Blue ID. BCTC students are also able to pay for trip registration online using their KCTCS login. Ride Home Express registration will be available as an option under the "Purchase Permits" section once logged in. All other riders must register and pay for their seats in person at the main PTS office, located in the Press Avenue Garage, at the corner of Press and Virginia Avenues. One-way fares may be purchased in person only. The office is open 7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.

PTS recommends registering for the trip as soon as possible. Space is limited, and seats will be sold on a first-come, first-served basis.

PTS can provide transportation for Ride Home Express riders to and from Commonwealth Stadium. Riders interested in this option simply need to submit the Ride Home Express Shuttle to Commonwealth Stadium request form at least two business days in advance of the shuttle’s departure.

For more information on the Ride Home Express, including a list of fares and route maps, visit the Ride Home Express page or the Ride Home Express Frequently Asked Questions.

UK Choristers Invites Bluegrass to Join Them for 'A Night on Broadway'

Fri, 01/29/2016 - 16:48

UK Choristers perform "Pandemonium" from "The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee" in 2013. 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 1, 2016) — The thrills and trills of New York's biggest musicals will light up the stage as the University of Kentucky Choristers step into the spotlight for "A Night on Broadway" this weekend. The popular annual musical revue, including show-stopping selections from "Les Miserables," "Wicked," "Ragtime" and more, will begin with five-star appetizers at 7 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 6, in the Singletary Center for the Arts lobby prior to the one-act performance at 8 p.m., in the Recital Hall. Dessert will be served in the lobby after the show.

The Choristers, conducted by Beth Wilson, is the oldest performing organization on campus. Filled with underclassmen and representing a wide variety of majors, the group frequently performs on and off campus. The 60-voice mixed choir specializes in choral repertoire of all periods and styles, both a cappella and accompanied, and also performs a major work each year with the UK Symphony Orchestra. Additionally, UK Choristers have been featured with the Lexington Philharmonic Orchestra in its "Unplugged and Untied" Concert Series.

Admission to UK Choristers' "Night on Broadway" is $10 for UK students with valid student ID, $15 for UK faculty and staff, $25 for general admission, and $35 for VIPs, which includes courtesy parking pass for early ticket purchases. Tickets are available at the Singletary Center ticket office at www.scfatickets.com, by phone at 859-257-4929 or in person at the venue.

For more information on the UK Choristers or other UK Choirs' events, contact Joseph Wrightson, administrative assistant to UK Choirs, at wrightson.joseph@gmail.com.

The UK Choristers are part of the UK School of Music at UK College of Fine Arts. The school has garnered a national reputation for high-caliber education in opera, choral and instrumental music performance, as well as music education, composition, and theory and music history.

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

PRSSA to Host First Meeting of Semester, Resume Workshop

Fri, 01/29/2016 - 14:52

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 1, 2016)  The University of Kentucky chapter of Public Relations Students Society of America (PRSSA) is hosting its first meeting of the spring semester at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 2, in the Grehan Journalism Building Student Services Center. The speaker for this meeting will be John Winn Miller. Miller will be assisting students in résumé building as well as answering questions about future internships and interviews.

Students are encouraged to bring résumés and come with any questions that they may have. This meeting is open to all students — all majors, members and non-members of PRSSA. However, the organization is mainly geared towards integrated strategic communication majors and communication majors.

PRSSA’s main goal is to offer resources for students to get engaged and to help enhance their knowledge of public relations.

PRSSA is an organization that can offer lifelong opportunities, professional growth as well as valuable networking. PRSSA is also a wonderful avenue that aids in the exposure of public relations and communications to its members. For more information follow @UKPRSSA on Twitter or email PRSSA President Jordan Mason at jordan.mason19@uky.edu.

MEDIA CONTACT: Katy Bennett or Rebecca Stratton, katy.bennett@uky.edu or rebecca.stratton@uky.edu, 859-257-1909/859-323-2395 

Phi Beta Kappa Accepting Nominations

Fri, 01/29/2016 - 14:40

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 1, 2016) — The University of Kentucky chapter of Phi Beta Kappa, the nation's oldest and most widely known academic honor society, is currently accepting nominations through Friday, Feb. 26.

Phi Beta Kappa elects more than 15,000 new members a year from 270 chapters across the United States. There are also more than 50 associations that foster friendship and learning in their members' communities and provide a means for members to continue their active affiliation with the society after graduation. The society celebrates excellence in the liberal arts and sciences.

The UK chapter is accepting self-nominations. For application information, visit www.uky.edu/academy/phi-beta-kappa.

UK's Phi Beta Kappa chapter is supported by the Chellgren Center for Undergraduate Excellence, which is part of the Academy for Undergraduate Excellence within the Division of Undergraduate Education.

MEDIA CONTACT: Jenny Wells, 859-257-5343; jenny.wells@uky.edu

UK CNP Students Attend National Nonprofit Conference

Fri, 01/29/2016 - 12:38

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 1, 2016) — Students with the University of Kentucky Certified Nonprofit Professional (CNP) program participated recently in the largest nonprofit conference in the country geared toward college students.

The Alliance Management Institute (AMI) conference was held Jan. 3-5, in Houston. Sponsored by the Nonprofit Leadership Alliance, the conference is held annually for students pursuing the CNP credential. The purpose of the conference is to expose future social sector leaders to a vibrant learning experience that promotes nonprofit best practices, innovative thinking, and awareness of the full scope of the sector. This year’s conference explored themes revolving around creating and sustaining social change.

"AMI (provides) the chance to participate with other like-minded individuals to both obtain and synthesize knowledge to actually form our own ideas on how nonprofits should work,” said Logan Hurley, a communication senior. "Plus, the networking is awesome."

This year's conference brought together 430 CNP undergraduate and graduate students from more than 40 colleges and universities. The conference included the participation of more than three dozen nonprofit partners, including Make-A-Wish and the Wounded Warrior Project. 

Students participated in workshops, networking expos with industry professionals, research presentations, plenary sessions, and intensive case studies focused on addressing real issues faced by nonprofit organizations in Houston. Workshops covered such areas as nonprofit communications and marketing, financial management, business ethics, fundraising, volunteer recruitment, and media relations. David Williams, president and CEO of Make-A-Wish America, provided the opening keynote address.

"The conference was great because it gave me the opportunity to both engage the theories and best practices I had learned in my nonprofit management classes and internships, but also to attend workshops and hear from industry leaders about exciting new trends within social enterprise that I wasn’t familiar with before attending," said Jacob Redwine, a mathematical economics sophomore.

Next year's AMI conference will take place in Denver in January. For more information about how to get involved with UK's CNP program, visit www.uky.edu/UGE/CNP. Early decision student applications for fall 2016 are due Feb. 28.

About UK CNP

The CNP certificate program is part of Transformative Learning, which also includes programs such as The Study and Presentation U!; providing a variety of academic support services for undergraduate students. The CNP program is designed to strengthen the leadership skills of undergraduate students interested in pursuing a career in the nonprofit sector as well as explore emerging new trends in social enterprise and innovation through a combination of core courses in nonprofit management, a series of workshops led by both academic and industry professionals, and practical skill-building activities through workshops and nonprofit internship experiences.

"UK’s CNP program has really challenged everything I thought I knew about nonprofits, so much so that I changed my major because of it. It’s allowed me to explore and learn about various career paths and has really reinforced the importance of having a career that affects positive and measurable change in the world," said Jacob Redwine.

Currently in its second year of development at UK, CNP brings together passionate and enterprising students from many diverse academic backgrounds including education, health care, science, business, communications and the humanities for a cohort-based educational experience that encourages the exchange of innovative ideas and dynamic perspectives. CNP students have worked with a wide variety of organizations in the Bluegrass region, including the American Red Cross Bluegrass Chapter, Refuge for Women, Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Bluegrass, Habitat for Humanity and more.

MEDIA CONTACT: Jenny Wells, 859-257-5343; jenny.wells@uky.edu

How Can Art Help Patients with Dementia?

Fri, 01/29/2016 - 09:48

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 1, 2016) — Dementia is a "family disease." The patient, their loved ones and their caregivers are all affected. 

Dementia refers to a decline of cognitive health that interferes with everyday life. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most recognizable form of dementia, but many other conditions can also affect cognitive health. There is no cure for AD, and almost all patients with dementia will eventually require constant care from a caregiver or loved one. In 2015, there were 5.3 million Americans suffering from this devastating disease.

In the creation of art, multiple aspects of learning take place and multiple domains related to learning are engaged, including focus and concentration, problem-solving skills, tolerance to ambiguity, image and concept formation, imagination, and visual-spatial thinking, just to name a few. On top of that, feelings and emotional sensitivities are involved in producing a work of art, as well as important motor skills like hand-eye coordination.

Researchers at the University of Kentucky are looking further into the notion that visual arts can have a positive effect on patients with mild to moderate dementia. This study will also explore the potential effects on the patient's caregiver.

By having participants create art — such as drawing, sculpture, and/or paper mache, we hope to enhance problem solving skills, focus/concentration, and hand-eye coordination. We also hope to see an improvement in mood and in overall thinking, all of which contribute significantly to quality of life.

This study will be eight weeks long and will meet once a week at the School of Arts and Visual Studies. Each session will last about an hour and a half.  Participation in the study, including all art materials, is free of charge. To be involved in this study the patient must live at home, have intact hearing/vision, and have mild to moderate dementia. The caregiver needs to have at least ten contact hours a week with the patient and be able to accompany and assist the patient during the study.

If you would like to know more about the study, contact Dr. Allan Richards, 859-361-1483 or Ann Christianson-Tietyen, 859-312-4553.

Ann Christianson-Tietyen is an Instructor of Art Education in the University of Kentucky School of Art and Visual Studies

This column appeared in the January 31, 2016 edition of the Lexington Herald-Leader.

Economic Outlook Conference Topic of WUKY's 'UK Perspectives'

Thu, 01/28/2016 - 19:10

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 1, 2016) — WUKY's "UK Perspectives" focuses on the people and programs of the University of Kentucky and is hosted by WUKY General Manager Tom Godell. WUKY News Director Alan Lytle sat in for Godell last Friday and talked to Chris Bollinger, director of the Center for Business and Economic Research in UK's Gatton College of Business and Economics. Bollinger provided a preview of the upcoming UK Economic Outlook Conference.

To listen to the Jan. 29 podcast interview from which "UK Perspectives" is produced, visit http://wuky.org/post/uk-perspectives-previewing-cbers-annual-economic-outlook-conference.

"UK Perspectives" airs at 8:45 a.m. and 5:45 p.m. each Friday on WUKY 91.3, UK's NPR station.

Community Transition Program Supports Stroke Survivors in Eastern Kentucky

Thu, 01/28/2016 - 17:51

Lexington, Ky. (Jan. 29, 2016) – Life after a stroke can be a big adjustment for both a patient and their family. Speech, walking, coordination — tasks once simple, nearly automatic— become difficult or impossible after a stroke. Meanwhile, health care after a stroke can get complicated, especially if someone also has conditions like diabetes or heart disease. In a rural setting, the distance from doctors and resources exacerbates these challenges.

“Stroke is a hard, hard thing to deal with,” said Lloyd Cornett, a stroke survivor from Slemp, Ky.  A retired coal miner and a week shy of his 61st birthday, he spent 36 years — more than half his life — working underground.

After his stroke, he couldn’t speak and the right side of his body was numb. But the hardest thing after his stroke was people saying he would have another one within a year, and it would be worse than the first.

“They were telling me things I just didn’t need to hear,” he said. “They had me downhearted so bad it was just unreal. And then Keisha came into the picture, and I found out there was just no proof to what people were telling me.”

Keisha Hudson is the patient navigator for the Community Transition Program, which provides education, resources and care coordination for individuals who are moving between care facilities and their homes in Perry and surrounding counties. As of July 2015, the program is jointly funded by the University of Kentucky Center for Excellence in Rural Health (where Hudson also serves as a research assistant) and Appalachian Regional Healthcare, a not-for-profit health system serving residents across Eastern Kentucky and Southern West Virginia. 

Through Hudson, Cornett learned that a second stroke was far from inevitable.  She also helped him obtain and understand his medications, learn to monitor his health, and connect with a monthly support group for stroke survivors. The group provides a supportive community and hosts speakers to address common comorbidities for stroke survivors (and often their caregivers), such as diabetes and blood pressure management.

“If I didn’t have this program, with all the talk that I’ve heard and the things that I’ve experienced, I’d say most likely I’d be kicking up daisies by now. I couldn’t have survived without them,” Cornett said. “Keisha and the doctor come and see me, and they’re just number one in my opinion, and they always will be. They sit you down and they’ll talk to you, tell you every little thing to look for, what to do, and how to do it. I’m a diabetic, and they have people come to the stroke meetings to talk about that, or blood pressure or health things we need to know. I just can’t say enough about how good they are.”

If Hudson did save Cornett’s life, it wouldn’t be the first time she’d prevented a death in the course of her work as the patient navigator. On one of her routine visits to check on a stroke survivor, she arrived to find the patient in a diabetic coma. With another patient, Hudson caught an infected surgical site that needed immediate attention. While on the phone with yet another patient, Hudson recognized heavy breathing and directed the patient to seek medical care immediately. The patient was hospitalized with dangerous levels of fluid on her lungs. While none of the patients in the transition program have been readmitted to the hospital for stroke complications, Hudson’s attentive care has led to life-saving interventions related to patients’ other health issues.

“A lot of people who have had a stroke get home and they feel like they’re lost. They don’t know what to do, they don’t know who to contact for questions, they don’t get all the education they need about stroke and comorbidities. They get lost in the system, and therefore some of them end up back in the hospital. Our goal is to keep them out,” she said.

According to Patrick Kitzman, director of the Community Transition Program and associate professor of physical therapy at UK, such close-call stories of stroke survivors show that the need for coordinated care is especially acute in Kentucky. In 2014, the state ranked 47th in the country for incidence of stroke; in the eastern Appalachian region, stroke is especially prevalent. Concordantly, some of the highest rates of stroke risk factors, such as diabetes, obesity, hypertension, and heart disease, are also found in the region. Kitzman explains that many stroke survivors in the area have some of the highest levels of both health care needs and financial burden, and need dedicated support to navigate the health care system.

“The more that we do this program, the more I’m so absolutely convinced that the only way we can have proper support for people whose conditions are so complex is to have programs like this,” Kitzman said. “They have the fewest resources available to them, and they’re the furthest away from specialized care and from what they need. Many of them don’t know what resources exist. They need someone to walk them through this change in their life. And you absolutely need someone from their community who knows where all the little pockets of support exist.”

The Community Transition Program began in 2014 as pilot study, in collaboration with Appalachian Regional Healthcare (ARH) and funded by the UK Center for Clinical and Translational Science, which aims to address health disparities in central Appalachia. The pilot program demonstrated that quality of life and health outcomes for stroke survivors improved with the support of a patient navigator.

Primary needs among stroke survivors included assistance communicating with health care providers, insurance support, follow-up education, and connecting with community resources.  As of July 2015, the program is now sustainably funded by both the UK Center for Excellence in Rural Health (CERH) and ARH, which are located beside one another in Hazard, Ky. Patient navigation services are not currently covered by health insurers as reimbursable service, so the program requires dedicated funding.

Fran Feltner, director of the CERH, sees Hudson’s role as the patient navigator as key to ensuring the best outcomes for stroke survivors.

“The patient navigator is the connector, the link, the person standing with the clients at the center of their care,” Feltner said.  “She makes sure that all aspects of care are met. From the community to the hospital and back to the community, her clients have education and are provided the services needed to support health and social outcomes that ultimately improve their care and satisfaction of the healthcare system."

The program has served 23 individuals since July 2015, with Hudson providing more than 200 follow-up interactions. None of the stroke survivors who participated in the program were readmitted to the hospital. While Kitzman and Hudson are still finalizing the most recent data, he says that their readmission rates are well below comparison groups.

Violet Sylvia, system director for rehabilitation at ARH, where many stroke survivors receive care and rehabilitation, sees that the collaboration between her organization and UK as reflection of their mutual commitment to sustainable efforts for improved health in the region.

“We all learn from each other. It’s really a true collaboration, where we all feel like we have equal trust, equal partnership, and we’re all committed to ensuring that we’re giving back to the community in a meaningful way. Not just coming in, collecting data and leaving, but really following through in a meaningful way,” she said.

Sylvia said that one lesson from the pilot program was the importance of connecting patients to the program while they’re still in the hospital, in order to establish a trusting relationship and reduce gaps in care. Hudson, as the patient navigator, therefore receives a daily list of patients with stroke or neurological diagnoses so that she can introduce herself and offer the program before patients and their families leave the hospital. She then follows the patients through their hospital stay and rehab, and participates in patients’ discharge planning. By the time she’s visiting patients in their homes, everyone knows one another. She checks on each patient weekly for the first month that they’re home, then transitions to biweekly or monthly checks as patients become more stable. Even though the program is designed to provide a year of support, she says she's been working with some patients for longer than that. 

"I’m not goin to say 'OK, your time is up,'" said Hudson. "A few people we’ve followed for more than year because they still need things, and I’m not going discharge them from the program just because it's been 12 months."

She intentionally holds the monthly stroke support group in the hospital so patients and their families can come down from their hospital rooms to get involved in the program before they’re even sent home.

Shannon Polly, a stroke survivor and participant in the Community Transition Program, says that just talking about your experiences after a stroke can be helpful. Trouble with speaking or other tasks can make you feel frustrated or depressed after a stroke, she said, but sharing with others is a way to learn coping strategies and keeps things in perspective.

“It just helps to talk to other people and see what they’re going through too. Sometimes they can give you little pointers on what you can do with your daily routine to kind of help yourself,” she said.

Hudson, who was born and raised in Eastern Kentucky, admits to feeling protective of the people she works with in the Community Transition Program.

“I consider them ‘my’ people,” she said. “And I feel very good about the people we can help and what all we can do for them – the education and resources we can provide to make their quality of life better in their communities.”

Kitzman hopes that in the future they can expand the program to other diagnoses and other geographic areas.

“Our work so far show us a couple of things,” he said. “It’s showing that our population is very involved and requires a lot of help. Standard of care is that you send them home and one week later you check on them, and then that’s it. But we’re showing that you need to be much more hands on. A lot of data now show that these folks require support for an extended period of time, and our data is bearing that out at as well. But we also had people who didn’t meet our program requirements because of their diagnosis or geographic area, which shows that that we need more people down here to help.  When you’re traveling in the region, you can have an hour driving time within one county, so there’s a need for more navigators. We’re providing a significant number of services for our individuals, and it looks like we’re keeping them out of the hospital.”

MEDIA CONTACT: Mallory Powell, mallory.powell@uky.edu

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