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Native Appalachian Strives to Improve Rural Health

Tue, 01/26/2016 - 15:42

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 27, 2016) — With picturesque mountains, moderate weather, a rich history and a culture filled with art and music, Appalachia is a region many are proud to call home.

Unfortunately, Appalachia is also home to the highest rates of smoking and smoking-related diseases – such as lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) – in the nation.

Brady Reynolds works in the University of Kentucky College of Medicine's Department of Behavioral Science. With a deep personal connection to Appalachia and a love for the region, Reynolds works in Eastern Kentucky to help find new strategies to reduce smoking rates and improve the health of the community.

Reynolds grew up on a farm in rural Virginia. The Appalachian influence in his family permeated his childhood, listening to his father play banjo in a bluegrass band and developing a deep appreciation for his roots.

When he graduated high school, he stayed in Appalachia to continue his education, earning a bachelor's degree in psychology from James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Va., and a doctorate in Lifespan Developmental Psychology from West Virginia University in Morgantown. After working in the field for several years, Reynolds joined the faculty at UK to invest himself in addressing Appalachian health issues.

“When I started doing smoking-related research, it was a natural evolution for me to focus my work in rural Appalachia,” Reynolds said.

Because of the myriad health issues smokers experience as they age and high rates of smoking, Appalachian communities face many health problems. For researchers looking for new strategies to reduce smoking rates and improve health in the community, the region is a fertile testing ground.

The reasons for the high smoking rates in Appalachian communities are well known but difficult to combat nonetheless. Rural Appalachian communities traditionally relied on tobacco production, had lower educational attainment and higher poverty rates. All of these factors associate with increased smoking rates.

“Working to reduce use of tobacco in Appalachia is complex for many of the same reasons,” Reynolds said. “Additionally, most of the people in this region are resistant to accepting strategies or interventions that originate from outside the Appalachian community. Also, limited access to information and services further complicates efforts to reduce smoking.”

Many of the rules that apply to community smoking rates simply do not apply in rural Appalachia.

Adolescents outside Appalachian communities have a higher risk to start smoking if they score higher for psychological measures of impulsive behavior. In rural Appalachia, Reynolds was surprised to find in a 2015 study this did not hold true for Appalachian adolescents. Instead, he found a more accurate predictor of adolescent smoking was how many friends and family members smoked.

In other words, Reynolds found the sheer number of significant others who smoke could override an adolescent’s better judgment.

Also, pregnant women living in Appalachia are more likely to smoke, with as many as one in four women smoking while pregnant. Children born to mothers who smoked while pregnant are themselves more likely to smoke in addition to being at greater risk for a litany of other health pitfalls like obesity, impaired reading, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

An end result is a cycle of health problems and poverty.

In order to help people in rural Appalachia quit smoking and take charge over their health, Reynolds began working with local communities in the countryside to experiment with new smoking cessation programs. Reynolds currently operates near Morehead, Ky., in the Appalachian Health Research Center, where he and his team are testing a new program to help residents quit smoking.

Current smoking cessation programs often rely on counseling, meaning participants travel to a health center for their regimen. This approach is unfortunately less successful in rural Appalachia because residents may live in isolated communities with limited access to health centers.

Reynolds believes another approach known as contingency management (CM) already utilized by mental health and substance abuse professionals could help people quit smoking. CM programs tested outside of Appalachia show promise, and Reynolds hopes a web-based program could work when other approaches have not.

CM programs use a reward-based system to achieve results. As participants modify their behavior by cutting back on the number of cigarettes they smoke, they receive monetary compensation or vouchers for rewards. The more progress the participants make, the more CM program rewards them for their effort. Such programs already have proven track records with other addictive drug, like opiates and cocaine.

Reynolds focuses most of his efforts with testing the CM program on adolescent and pregnant smokers, both of whom have difficulty traveling to health centers for counseling and could potentially benefit the most from the new strategy. Unfortunately, even the web-based CM program faces challenges. Because rural Appalachia has limited access to broadband internet, more than 95 percent of Reynolds’ participants needed loaner internet equipment for the studies.

Each day, participants would log on to the web-based program called Mōtiv8 and use a webcam to record videos of measuring carbon monoxide levels in their blood with a breath test. Participants would save their videos to the server along with their carbon monoxide data so Reynolds and his team could assess how well the program worked.

Each study was small, but the results showed promise.

Roughly one-third of pregnant mothers stopped smoking completely, and adolescent cigarette use halved. Furthermore, six weeks after the studies concluded, most participants did not relapse. Reynolds currently plans to increase the number of participants in future studies to see if the observed benefits of the CM program continue to hold. If the CM program still appears effective, then his team can focus on making the regimen economically feasible for the larger population.

“Smoking during pregnancy is the leading cause of low birth weight and preterm birth, and these infants often spend substantial time in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), which can be very costly for hospitals and insurers,” Reynolds said. “If we find our smoking cessation programs reduce preterm birth (and the associated NICU costs), then we can start making the argument to stakeholders for implementing the programs on a larger scale.”

Reynolds’ research is currently supported in part by the UK Markey Cancer Center, National Cancer Institute and Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky Endowed Chair in Rural Health Policy.

MEDIA CONTACT: Allison Perry, (859) 323-2399 or allison.perry@uky.edu

New ResearchMatch Kiosk at UK HealthCare at Turfland

Tue, 01/26/2016 - 14:20

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 27, 2016) – A new kiosk at UKHealthCare at Turfland allows patients and visitors to join ResearchMatch, a free, secure, national registry that connects interested individuals with a vast array of health research opportunities around the country. More than 89,000 volunteers and 3,000 researchers at 115 institutions create the ResearchMatch community that makes health discoveries possible.

Health research is essential to improving healthcare and wellbeing, but many studies end too early because there are too few participants. Even though there are many people who want to join research studies, it’s sometimes difficult to find the right match for them or their family.  ResearchMatch is an effort to address this problem by making it easier for volunteers and researchers to find one another.

Many studies are looking for healthy people of all ages, while some studies are looking for people with specific health conditions. This means that everyone can be the perfect research match. Participating in research is a way to make a difference in the future of health care and to engage more actively with your own health.

Joining ResearchMatch is quick, confidential, and open to everyone regardless of age or health status. Members of ResearchMatch are notified by email about studies that might interest them, ranging from surveys to clinical trials, and then they choose if they would like to learn more or participate.

Promoting access to ResearchMatch reflects UK’s commitment to improving lives through research and becoming one the nation’s best public research universities. The kiosk is hosted by the UK Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCTS), which is funded by the National Institutes of Health to accelerate the translation of discoveries into tangible advances for human health. The UK CCTS focuses especially on health concerns of Kentucky and Central Appalachia.  ResearchMatch was developed by our partners at Vanderbilt University.

To learn more and join ResearchMatch, visit the website or stop by the kiosk at UKHealthCare at Turfland. If you have questions about ResearchMatch or participating in research, please contact Roxane Poskin, CCTS Participant Recruitment Manager, at roxane.poskin@uky.edu or 859 257-7856.

MEDIA CONTACT: Mallory Powell, Mallory.powell@uky.edu

UK Scientist Profiles Get 324,000 Views on LabTV

Tue, 01/26/2016 - 11:49

Video courtesy of REVEAL Research Media, featured on LabTV

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 27, 2016) — Over the last six months, videos of 22 biomedical researchers from the University of Kentucky, featured on the national website LabTV, have garnered 324,000 views.

LabTV.com features thousands of researchers working at dozens of leading universities, corporations, and the National Institutes of Health. In these videos medical researchers tell where they came from, how they chose their career, what they do each day in the lab, and why they love it.

Video courtesy of REVEAL Research Media, featured on LabTV

Jay Walker of TEDMED, in partnership with the National Institutes of Health, started the site because if high school students or college undergrads can personally identify with a young medical researcher, they are far more likely to consider becoming one.

UK Vice President for Research Lisa Cassis, a professor of pharmacology and nutritional sciences, said, "We have a diverse group of talented young scientists in the labs of faculty across the depth of UK’s campus. Many of them are supported by the $95.4 million in NIH funding UK successfully secured last year. What better way to encourage young people interested in biomedical science to join us at UK than to introduce them to people who are actively engaged in health-related research?”

The most recent scientists profiled on LabTV’s UK Channel include:

  • Taylor Robinson, an Illinois native and freshman chemical engineering major, is studying muscle stem cells in Esther Dupont-Versteegden’s lab. He counts his uncles—an orthopedic physician and a physician’s assistant—and astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson as inspirations. 
  • Amanda Hayek, an Ohio native, has worked in Esther Dupont-Versteegden’s lab for two years. She is an American Physiological Society Stride Fellow. Hayek came to UK as a voice major, assuming Broadway was her destination, but switched her major freshman year once she got involved in research.
  • Ai-Ling Lin, a native of Taiwan who leads her own team in the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, was drawn to UK’s NIH-funded Alzheimer’s disease and translational research centers. She uses biomedical imaging to study brain aging and the impact of nutrition on cognition.

The first UK video was posted on LabTV in September 2015, and Research Communications is continuing to shoot videos for the site. Undergraduates, graduate students, postdoctoral students, and assistant professors—under the age of 40—conducting NIH-funded research are eligible to be featured on LabTV. Contact Alicia Gregory ( apgreg@uky.edu), director of Research Communications, to suggest a scientist.

UK Women & Philanthropy Network Awards Over $243,000 to Eight Academic Initiatives for 2015

Tue, 01/26/2016 - 10:23

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 20, 2016) — Eight academic initiatives at the University of Kentucky have been cumulatively awarded $243,035 by the UK Women & Philanthropy Network, an organization committed to bringing together women who “share the ambition of building a better UK” through philanthropy, announced Paula Pope, director of special projects in the UK Office of Philanthropy.

“The selected proposals for 2015 were excellent as the membership found them to demonstrate creativity, innovation and a commitment to student success,” Pope said. “2015 marked a record year for the Women & Philanthropy Network as it awarded nearly $244,000 for academic grants. We are most grateful to this organization’s leaders and members for their commitment to UK’s students and their academic excellence through philanthropic support.”

Grant funds were awarded to support the following programs:

·         “Supporting High Unmet Need for STEMCats Students in Fast Track,” College of Arts & Sciences, $9,750

·         “Preparing Behavior Analysts to Work with High-Needs Populations,” College of Education, $50,000

·         “UK Chorale Performance at New York City’s Carnegie Hall,” College of Fine Arts, $20,544

·         “Preparing Teachers for Work in Urban Schools,” College of Education, $29,000

·         “UK Symphony Outreach and Service,” College of Fine Arts, $30,000

·         “Workshop Production of Bounce: The Basketball Opera,” College of Fine Arts, $50,000

·         “Physical Therapy Scholarships for Women of Minority Backgrounds and Non-Traditional Students,” College of Health Sciences, $20,000

·         “Leading for Deeper Meaning Scholarships,” College of Education, $33,741

“The University of Kentucky is most appreciative of the Women & Philanthropy Network and co-chairs Marie Cull and Bonnie Mays for their support of this initiative,” said Mike Richey, vice president for philanthropy and chief philanthropy officer at UK. “Their steadfast commitment to and efforts in raising funds in support of our students’ academic pursuits is invaluable and we are most grateful.”

Since 2009, the UK Women & Philanthropy Network has awarded grants for scholarships, fellowships, travel abroad, research and special programs totaling nearly $1.3 million. The organization maintains a two-fold purpose: to raise philanthropic support for such academic initiatives and to recruit women across Kentucky and the nation committed to supporting a culture of philanthropy at the University of Kentucky.

A call for 2016 proposals will be announced in the spring with a deadline of June 15. For information concerning the University of Kentucky Women & Philanthropy Network or the 2016 funding cycle, please write or call Pope at the Office of Philanthropy, William B. Sturgill Building, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506-0015; (859) 257-3187; or email her at ppope@email.uky.edu. The network is online at www.uky.edu/womenandphilanthropy and www.facebook.com/UKWomenandPhilanthropy

MEDIA CONTACT: Marc C. Whitt, 859-257-7825, marc.whitt@uky.edu

RecycleMania: UK Aims to Recycle More Than Ever in 2016

Mon, 01/25/2016 - 16:39

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 26, 2016) — Folders, magazines, glass bottles, aluminum cans, office paper, and cardboard boxes that are brown or grey inside. What do all these items have in common? They're recyclable.

In 2014, UK recycled a total of 5,756,000 pounds. This amount includes recyclables from UK HealthCare, Athletics and off campus UK facilities. By sending some of its recyclables to the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government Recycling Center, UK, along with other entities, helps support more than 6,000 manufacturing jobs, including about 770 jobs in Kentucky, in companies that rely on recyclable materials.

While these numbers are impressive, UK aims to collect more recyclables than ever in 2016. In fact, UK will compete against hundreds of universities in RecycleMania, a national recycling competition among college and university recycling programs.

Throughout February and March, the UK Recycling Office, in collaboration with the UK Office of Sustainability, Greenthumb Environmental Club and UK Dining, will encourage UK students, faculty and staff to recycle more and waste less. Events across campus will highlight the importance of recycling at UK.

First up on the calendar is a Recycling Lunch and Learn from 12:15-12:45 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 16. The event will be held in the private dining room of Fresh Food Company at The 90. Anyone is welcome to attend and is encouraged to bring their own lunch.

As part of RecycleMania, UK recycling staff is also available to speak to any campus group, office or organization interested in learning more about recycling. Contact UK Recycling coordinator Esther Moberly at emoberly@uky.edu to schedule a talk.

To keep up with RecycleMania and to learn new information about recycling, follow UK Recycling on social media:

Facebook - UK Recycling

Twitter - UK Recycling

Snapchat - UK_Recycling

Instagram - universityofkentucky_recycling

Pinterest - UK Recycling 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

UK Alum Puts the 'Super' in Super Bowl Halftime Shows

Mon, 01/25/2016 - 16:14

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 26, 2016) — If you have a major production in the works and want to make it memorable, University of Kentucky mechanical engineering alumnus James Casalino can make it happen. Want a video wall to pop out of the stage? No problem. Want a three-story seating area for an audience? They’ve done it. Rising staircases, wrap-around stages, structures that seem to appear out of thin air? Why not? This is the outfit that has constructed the Super Bowl halftime show set for the past five years.

Casalino leads the drafting and design team at All Access Staging Productions located in Los Angeles. In addition to Super Bowl halftime shows, Casalino has designed sets for concerts, television shows, awards ceremonies, political conventions and more. It is not a job for the faint-hearted.

“Clients give us conceptual designs for ideas like ‘floating drum riser’ or ‘stair that appears out of the stage’ as well as other structures that at first glance would seem impossible to actually build,” describes Casalino. “Then it’s our job to turn those artistic ideas into reality.”

No matter how crazy the inspiration or imminent the deadline, he and his team fight the impulse to freak out and, instead, put their training and talent to work. After all, they can’t say no.

“I used to have a saying that I would only do the impossible once a day,” Casalino says laughing. “Then my boss asked, ‘Who told you it could only be once a day?'”

Do the impossible. That’s the job.

Perhaps Casalino isn’t averse to spontaneous requests because he has been known to make them himself. While visiting the University of Kentucky as a high school student from just outside Chicago, he showed up at the College of Engineering on a whim. He had no appointment and no contacts. Fortunately, electrical engineering Professor Bruce Walcott dropped what he was doing and gave the Casalino family a personal tour of the college.

“There was a friendliness at UK that I loved,” Casalino reminisces. “I felt like if I went to Kentucky, I would be more than just a name or a number, but rather part of a community.”

As with many engineers, Casalino grew up with an interest in how things work, taking apart plenty of remote control cars along the way; however, he also nurtured his artistic side through theatre — both on the stage and behind the scenes. Particularly, he loved building the scenery for the productions; however, when it came time to choose a major, he was concerned about the tenuous job security of professional theatre and opted for mechanical engineering.

“I went into mechanical engineering mainly out of curiosity. Just as many people see doctors, and say ‘I wish I could do that,’ I saw robotics and everyday products, and thought, ‘I wish I could design that,'” he remembers.

Drawn primarily to project-based classes that resemble the real world experience of working in teams, Casalino enjoyed his education and learned valuable skills; yet he discovered that he missed the energy of stage production. He wondered if he could apply what he was learning to find employment with Disney Imagineering or a cinematic special effects company. After conducting preliminary research, Casalino hand-wrote approximately 50 letters to every special effects company in the Los Angeles area, asking for an internship. Of the 50, only four responded. But two offered an interview and during the 2004 Spring Break, Casalino flew to L.A. to interview with All Access. After the interview, they offered him a summer internship.

The week before he arrived, one of the two principal drafters in the company left. Immediately, Casalino was thrust into the action, working directly with the principal designer and drafter on concert tours. Among the 25-30 projects he worked on that summer, his two biggest undertakings were the “American Idols Live” tour and Rascal Flatts' “Here’s to You” tour. Casalino excelled. Just before his internship ended, he divulged a secret to his co-workers: he had never before been to a live concert — at least not one at a venue larger than a county fair. Thrilled with his work, All Access asked him to stay. Although it had been an amazing internship, Casalino was determined to finish his degree and declined.

But seeds had been sown. Before graduating, Casalino sent letters once again to the same 50 or so special effects companies in Los Angeles. This time he interviewed with three companies, but it was All Access that gave him the best offer. In the summer of 2005, he moved to California for good.

All Access has been doing the Super Bowl Halftime Show set construction since 2011 and Casalino says each year poses unique challenges.

“We created the video wall that flipped up from the stage for Beyoncé’s Super Bowl XLVII halftime show, and we created lifts and a quick deployment slackline for Madonna’s Super Bowl XLVI halftime show," he said. "This past year for Katy Perry’s Super Bowl XLIX halftime show, almost the entire set was fabricated from scratch; but no matter what we do, everything is reviewed and calculated by an independent engineering team to confirm our structural design is adequate.”

The list of shows and events Casalino has contributed to is impressive, crammed with familiar names: The “Monster” tour featuring Eminem and Rihanna, tours by Van Halen and Rascal Flatts, "American Idol," "Dancing with the Stars," the World Poker Tour, the 2006 Grammy Awards, "Are You Smarter Than a Fifth Grader?" and more.

When he thinks about how an engineering degree helped him get into such an exhilarating field, Casalino speaks positively of his experience at UK.

“I believe the UK College of Engineering helped open doors for me," he said. "Even with all of the challenges I have had in my job, getting my engineering degree was the hardest thing I have ever done — and also one of the most rewarding. I am so thankful for the time I spent at UK and all of the great people who were a part of my education.”

When he isn’t conjuring the impossible, Casalino enjoys spending time with his wife, Meredith, daughter, Hannah, and dog, Rocket Toes. When time permits, he engages in photography as a hobby. While it hasn’t worked out to make it back to campus since he graduated, Casalino keeps in touch with friends and faithfully follows Kentucky basketball, even keeping a conspicuously out-of-place Kentucky flag in his office.

So what is next for James Casalino? There isn’t a whole lot in his industry that he hasn’t done. When asked, he admits that while he has done design work for almost every kind of major production possible, there is one event he would love to be a part of someday, a landmark show that would not only hold the rapt attention of the nation, but the entire world — the opening ceremonies of the Olympic Games.

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

Nursing Professor's Study of Anti-Tobacco Campaign Underscores Power of Community Action

Mon, 01/25/2016 - 15:14

Lexington, Ky. (Jan. 26, 2016) — An anti-smoking intervention implemented and studied by University of Kentucky College of Nursing assistant professor Amanda Fallin recently proved effective in counteracting pro-tobacco promotions and ending the presence of free or low-cost tobacco products in LGBT social venues.

In San Jose, California, where a statewide smoke-free law prohibits lighting up in bars, tobacco companies targeted members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community by infiltrating LBGT social venues from 2013 to 2015.   

A major tobacco company scheduled promotional visits to 10 San Jose bars during the two-year period, but more than a quarter of those visits occurred at the single LGBT bar on the list of participating venues. Studies show LGBT individuals are more likely to smoke than their counterparts and tobacco companies marketed to this vulnerable population.

Fallin, who completed a postdoctoral fellowship with the University of California-San Francisco Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education, tracked the progress of the “Butt Out of Our Bars” campaign to eliminate the influence of tobacco companies in San Jose’s LGBT bars and nightclubs. The intervention, led by 34 anti-smoking and LGBT organizations in the community, was successful in passing an ordinance prohibiting the distribution of free and low-cost tobacco products in all public spaces, including bars.

Started in July of 2013, the campaign developed educational materials about smoking and tracked the promotions of cigarettes and e-cigarettes in LGBT bars. In addition, the campaign obtained more than 1,800 petition signatures from residents concerned about the promotion of tobacco products in LGBT bars. The organizers also presented information regarding the disproportionate risk of tobacco use in LGBT individuals to members of the city council. In June 2015 the city council passed an ordinance prohibiting the distribution of free or low-cost tobacco products in bars.

“This campaign used simple and cost-effective actions to counteract the influence of tobacco companies on LGBT populations," Fallin said. "The case study stands as an example of the power of community organizing to impact policy change.“

To read the full article, click here

MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Adams, elizabethadams@uky.edu

A Day in the Life of a UK Student: Jan. 26, 1912

Mon, 01/25/2016 - 14:07

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 26, 2016) — In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 157th diary entry from Jan. 26, 1912, recalls a night of fun that included dinner with friends before going to the Leap Year Dance together.

Jan. 26th. The much talked of Leap year Dance. We have a Leap Year Feast — with programs too, heaps of fun! Games, etc. Where Annabel stars every time.

Next to her Jan. 26th diary entry, McClure inserted a list of friends with the items they were bringing to their Leap Year Feast.

More on Virginia Clay McClure

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish. 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.

The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.

McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.

The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots.

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Hollywood Blacklister Subject of New UPK Book, Award-Nominated Movie

Mon, 01/25/2016 - 12:08

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 26, 2016) — Now remembered as the Oscar-winning screenwriter of films like "Roman Holiday" (1953), "Spartacus" (1960) and "Exodus" (1960), during the Cold War, Dalton Trumbo was perhaps most famous, or infamous, after he was sentenced to a year in prison at the Federal Corrections Facility in Ashland, Kentucky, as a member of the Hollywood Ten who opposed the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC). Today, movie enthusiasts can learn more about this legend in the history of film at their nearest bookstore or movie theater.

Trumbo is the focus of a new University Press of Kentucky (UPK) biography, " Dalton Trumbo: Blacklisted Hollywood Radical," by Larry Ceplair and Christopher Trumbo, Dalton’s son. The book is a comprehensive biography of the screenwriter, playwright and author who sacrificed a successful career to stand up for his rights and defend political freedom.

TRUMBO: Official Trailer from Bleecker Street on Vimeo.

With the movie award season underway, Trumbo is also finding his place on the big screen again in a new biopic starring Bryan Cranston as the besieged writer. "Trumbo," directed by Jay Roach, received two Golden Globes nominations — Bryan Cranston for best performance by an actor and Helen Mirren for best actress in a motion picture: drama. Cranston has also received an Oscar nomination for best actor in a leading role. In addition, the movie garnered the most nominations of any film for the Screen Actors Guild Awards being presented this weekend.

When Dalton Trumbo was called to testify to HUAC in 1947, committee chairman J. Parnell Thomas denied Trumbo permission to read his opening statement, despite an earlier hearing where Thomas had allowed an opening statement by white supremacist Gerald L.K. Smith.

The testimony that followed, or rather, a lack of testimony, was a battle of wills between the leading member of the Hollywood Ten, refusing to answer questions about his membership in the Communist Party, and the chairman’s gavel, which continuously pounded away at any of Trumbo’s responses.

Trumbo was subsequently sent to Kentucky’s Ashland Federal Corrections Facility as prisoner number 7551 for his refusals, spending 11 months in incarceration from 1950 to 1951. Most of the citizens of Ashland did not realize they had subversives in their midst, but Trumbo was popular with the other inmates. Many were illiterate, and Trumbo wrote letters for them.

Yet, despite 13 years on the blacklist, spending a year at the Ashland Federal Correction Facility after being cited for contempt of Congress, and the financial hardships he endured while his name was on the blacklist, Trumbo built a legacy as one of the most versatile writers of the 20th century.

UPK is the scholarly publisher for the Commonwealth of Kentucky, representing a consortium that now includes all of the state universities, five private colleges and two historical societies. The editorial program of the press focuses on the humanities and the social sciences. Offices for the administrative, editorial, production and marketing departments of the press are found at UK, which provides financial support toward the operating expenses of the publishing operation.

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Kernel Photo Director Named Kentucky Student Photographer of the Year

Mon, 01/25/2016 - 09:48

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 26, 2016)  Michael Reaves, the Kentucky Kernel's photo director, has been named Kentucky Student Photographer of the Year.

Reaves won the award at the Kentucky News Photographers Association annual seminar and competition in Lexington Jan. 22-23. He will receive a Canon 70D camera and lens as the first place prize.

The student competition was open to currently enrolled students in Kentucky. Students from the University of Kentucky, Western Kentucky University, University of Louisville and Morehead State University competed. 

Taylor Pence, the Kernel’s photo editor, also placed in several categories in the competition.

This is the first time since the inception of the student KNPA contest more than a decade ago that the portfolio competition has been won by a University of Kentucky student. The portfolio was a selection of images representing the best of Reaves’ work from 2015.

Reaves’ and Pence’s winning images included photos from UK football games, the Breeder’s Cup, campus events and internships.

Judges for the competition were: 

  • Jack Gruber, staff photojournalist with USA Today
  • Amy Sancetta, staff photojournalist (retired) Associated Press
  • Grover Sanschagrin, co-founder of Photoshelter and SportsShooter.com

Below are the individual awards won by Reaves and Pence:

Michael Reaves

  • Student Photographer of the Year
  • 1st place Pictorial
  • 1st place Sports Action
  • 2nd place Spot News
  • 2nd place Sports Feature
  • 3rd place Sports Feature
  • 3rd place Illustration
  • Honorable Mention Feature Picture
  • Honorable Mention Sports Picture Story

Taylor Pence

  • 1st place Illustration
  • 2nd place Sports Action
  • 3rd place Sports Picture Story

Click here to see sportscaster Dick Vitale's special message to Reaves.

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, (859) 257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

UK Garners Strong Financial Ratings in Bond Issuance

Sun, 01/24/2016 - 23:01

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 25, 2016)  The University of Kentucky has garnered strong financial ratings from the country's leading ratings agencies, citing UK's enrollment growth, vibrant health care system and strong financial management.

The ratings — Aa2 from both Moody's and AA Standard & Poor's — were part of $160 million bond issuance last week on behalf of the $201 million new Student Center project. The Student Center will be completed in early 2018.

It's the second major rating in a row where the university garnered such strong marks for its financial health -- an important indication of the university's reputation as an institution regionally and nationally. The university received an upgrade by Standard & Poor’s in March of 2015, making the University one of only 10 institutions of higher education to receive a rating upgrade in 2015.

"These strong ratings underscore the momentum the University of Kentucky has and its continued transformation as the university for Kentucky," said Eric N. Monday, UK's executive vice president for finance and administration. "We have a campus that more and more is considered a regional and national institution of academic and research excellence as well as a growing, vibrant health system, increasingly renowned for the delivery of advanced specialty care. Moreover, philanthropic partnerships — as evidenced by the renovation and expansion of the Gatton College of Business and Economics — underscore the strong level of private support for our transformation and mission to be one of the best public, residential research institutions in the country.,"

In fact, the ratings agencies in analysis of the bond issuance cited:

--Strong financial management, marked by a low level of debt, only 3 percent of its annual expenses of  just over $2.7billion.

--Enrollment growth of nearly 10 percent over the last five years — to more than 30,000 students overall -- fueled in part by a campus transformation with nearly $2 billion in investment in classrooms, research spaces, residence halls and dining facilities

--Strong private support with gift receipts of $118 million and an endowment that has increased by 55 percent over the last 5 years to more than $1.2 billion

--A strong health-care system, now with a $1.3 billion budget and nearly 40,000 annual discharges

However, both agencies also noted as challenges declining state support. UK's state appropriations have been cut by $55 million on a recurring basis since 2008, from $335 million to $280 million this current fiscal year.

"We have tremendous momentum as the state's flagship, land-grant institution," Monday said. "It is important that we continue to prove to our stakeholders — from policymakers and ratings agencies to students families and alums — that we are good stewards of our finances and of their trust in us as their university."

UK Open and Operating on a Regular Schedule Monday, Jan. 25

Sun, 01/24/2016 - 22:15

The University of Kentucky will be open and operating on a regular schedule, Monday. Jan. 25. Classes will be in session, offices and UK HealthCare clinics will be open and operating on a normal schedule.

UK Dance Minors 'Shaping Space'

Fri, 01/22/2016 - 13:26

Trailer for "Shaping Space," running Jan. 29-31, at Guignol Theatre. Video by UK Department of Theatre and Dance.

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 25, 2016) — Once a year, the talents of the University of Kentucky's dance minors take center stage at Guignol Theatre. Don't miss your chance to catch this group of Department of Theatre and Dance students in one weekend of performances of "Shaping Space" Jan. 29-31.

Audiences stepping into the Guignol should prepare for the unexpected with "Shaping Space." UK Dance Program Director Susie Thiel has assembled a production of performances expected to energize, move, connect and fascinate audiences. "Prepare to experience a variety of worlds that celebrate the power of movement, grace and communication."

"Shaping Space" includes performances by UK dance minors performing works by guest choreographers Missy Lay Zimmer and Andrew Hubbard, artistic directors of Exhale Dance Tribe; Stephanie Harris, UK dance instructor; Laurie Fields, dance instructor at the School for the Performing Arts (SCAPA); and Susie Thiel.

Missy Lay Zimmer and Andrew Hubbard conceptualized and choreographed "Wohali," a contemporary dance piece. Wohali is the Cherokee word for "eagle" and the brain-child and inspiration of a future collaboration between Exhale Dance Tribe and Okareka Dance Company of New Zealand. "Wohali" is a meditation on a sacred messenger connecting the two continents by this majestic and elusive bird. Zimmer and Hubbard were artists-in-residence in November setting the dance, teaching master classes and giving lectures. Zimmer and Hubbard's career include credits on Broadway and in the commercial world.

What do we tell ourselves? What do we share with others? What is the crowd saying? Will our stories be the same tomorrow? "Conversations Change," choreographed by Lexington artist Laurie Fields, explores the many conversations in which we participate, both purposefully and subconsciously. The language of the body and the stories of the dancers enrich the movement. Set to music by the NOW Ensemble, this dance allows the audience member to eavesdrop, perhaps inspiring a personal reflective dialogue, or a friendly conversation of shared experiences with a stranger in the seat nearby.    

"Deluge," by Lexington artist Stephanie Harris, examines how we are often challenged by forces that are greater than ourselves and how those experiences alter our understanding of the human condition. These challenges provide us with a meaningful opportunity to embrace our vulnerabilities and develop a profound connection with ourselves and with others. Utilizing imagery of water, with help from video artist Valerie Fuchs, "Deluge" engages the audience visually on multiple levels with a piece that speaks to the fragility of life and the commonality of our life experiences.

Susie Thiel presents two dances in the concert. "Behind the Hair" created in collaboration with five dance minors, is an examination of the stages of gossip. The choreography acts as a catalyst for dialogues concerning why we gossip, how information gets disseminated and the harmful effects. The work, set in three sections, premiered at the Inner Mongolia University Arts College in China last October and will represent the UK Department of Theatre and Dance this March at the American College Dance Association Conference in Mississippi.

Thiel's second dance is loosely based on what we conceal and reveal, share and hide and what is seen and unseen. In this performance, six hanging panels on the stage help create an environment and acts as a metaphor of this human experience.

"Shaping Space" will take the Guignol stage 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Jan. 29 and 30, and 2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 31st. Tickets for the production are $15 for general admission and $10 for UK students with a valid ID through the Singletary Center box office. Processing fees will be added to ticket purchase. To purchase tickets, contact the box office at 859-257-4929, visit online at www.scfatickets.com or purchase in person during operating hours.

The UK Department of Theatre and Dance at UK College of Fine Arts has played an active role in the performance scene in Central Kentucky for more than 100 years. Students in the program get hands-on training and one-on-one mentorship from the renowned professional theatre faculty. The liberal arts focus of their bachelor's degree program is coupled with ongoing career counseling to ensure a successful transition from campus to professional life. 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

A Day in the Life of a UK Student: Jan. 25, 1912

Fri, 01/22/2016 - 11:02

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 25, 2016) — In celebration of the University of Kentucky sesquicentennial in 2015, UK Special Collections Research Center began releasing the diary entries of former student Virginia Clay McClure in fall of 2014. The diary chronicles the day-to-day activities of McClure's junior and senior years at the State University of Kentucky (now UK) from 1910-1912. McClure's 156th diary entry from Jan. 25, 1912, recalls a trip downtown with her friend Addie for a suit fitting and hot chocolate.  

Jan. 25th. Meet Addie downtown and go with her to try on her suit, which is too dear. Hot chocolate at Hughes!

More on Virginia Clay McClure

Virginia Clay McClure, a native of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, graduated in 1912 with an AB degree and received her master’s degree in 1928 from UK. After receiving her AB, she taught for a year at Middlesboro, Kentucky, another year at Paducah, Kentucky, and seven years in Cynthiana, Kentucky. After this, she returned to Lexington, where she taught for nine and a half years in the Fayette County schools. At this point, she took two and a half years off of work to complete her doctorate.

The first woman to receive a Ph.D. from UK, McClure said that her department chairman did not “want a woman to get a doctor’s degree.” In spite of those words, McClure received her doctoral degree in American history in 1934.

Her dissertation was “The Settlement of the Kentucky Appalachian Region,” about which “nothing had been done before.” McClure did significant original research for the dissertation and made several trips to Eastern Kentucky with Katherine Pettit, who had taught in settlement schools, including Pine Mountain School, which she helped to establish. 

McClure planned to teach at the college level but after finishing her dissertation in the midst of the depression, colleges were laying off faculty rather than hiring them. She then joined the Fayette County School system, then Lexington City Schools, and taught United States history and government at Henry Clay High School from 1934-1959. A position that she found quite rewarding.

The UK alumna and educator was very active in the community. McClure was a member of Central Christian Church and Kappa Delta Pi Honorary, Kentucky and National Retired Teachers associations, Salvation Army Auxiliary, Cardinal Hill Hospital Auxiliary and numerous historical societies. She was also a charter member of the Lexington Rose Society, twice serving as president, and was a member of the American Rose Society.

McClure passed away in 1980 at 91 years of age.

The Virginia Clay McClure papers are housed at the Special Collections Research Center and include a diary/scrapbook, a photograph album and other assorted photographs related to McClure's time as an undergraduate at State University, Lexington, Kentucky from 1910-1912. The scrapbook includes clippings, small artifacts, programs and invitations, but the bulk of the material is McClure's many personal writings. The photograph album and loose photographs also document this time period and include photographs of her UK classmates (many of whom are identified and also mentioned in her scrapbook); class trips and events (such as Arbor Day); and women playing basketball among other casual snapshots.

This story on UK's history is presented by UK Special Collections Research Center. UK Special Collections is home to UK Libraries' collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian collection and the digital library, ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

Diary transcriptions completed by senior Taylor Adams, Special Collections Learning Lab intern and history major from Ashland, Kentucky.

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Help Line Operating for UK Employees, Students and Visitors

Fri, 01/22/2016 - 08:39
LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 22, 2016)  University of Kentucky employees, students and visitors to our campus may call the university's help line for non-emergency related issues. Call either 855-682-4115 or 859-257-9253 for help. You also can report weather-releated issues on the university's LiveSafe app. Go to "report tips" and then to "winter weather" to report non-emergency related items.

Classes Canceled Friday, Jan. 22

Thu, 01/21/2016 - 17:11

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 21, 2016) — University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto announced Thursday that classes are canceled tomorrow (Friday), Jan. 22, and only Plan B (designated) employees are required to report to work. 

Updated information about scheduled events and what will be open or closed tomorrow and over the weekend can be found at www.uky.edu/alerts. The site will be updated as conditions or schedules change.

"The safety of our campus community is our top priority at the University of Kentucky," Capilouto said. "Given the high probability of a significant weather event tomorrow, we are making this decision now to ensure that students, faculty and staff can make appropriate decisions regarding their safety, travel and child care.

This decision also will allow our facilities and safety officials the time they need to ensure that the campus is appropriately prepared to be re-opened as early as possible."

UK Appreciation Day Commission Accepting T-shirt Designs from Employees

Thu, 01/21/2016 - 15:12

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 25, 2016) — Employees should mark their calendars for Thursday, May 26, as the University of Kentucky takes time out to say thank you to all those that make the university a thriving, collaborative academic community.

UK Appreciation Day returns to campus from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Seaton Center Gymnasium and Pieratt Field (corner of Cooper and University Drive), featuring some traditional activities that employees have enjoyed over the years as well as some new ways for employees to engage in the annual event.

As in past years, employees can enjoy food, live music, exhibits, a UK t-shirt giveaway, caricatures and more – all for free.

This year, the UK Appreciation Day Commission is offering employees a chance to design the t-shirt given away at the event. Those interested are encouraged to submit a t-shirt design to Trisha Clement at tclem2@uky.edu by Feb. 15 at 5 p.m.

Designs will need to be two colors maximum and be suitable for either a light or dark background. The winning design will have to be approved by UK Public Relations and Marketing (some minor modifications may be made by UKPR). The winner will receive a prize from the UKAD Commission.

The Appreciation Day Commission would love to hear from you. The commission is in the process of creating a frequently asked questions page. If you have any ideas or suggestions for future events, please do so at the following link: https://uky.az1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_cN14LOX2Utqggrr.

UK Appreciation Day is sponsored by the Office of the President, coordinated by the Staff Senate, and brought to you by the Appreciation Day Commission.

For more information, contact the Office of the Staff Senate Office Coordinator Holly Clark at hclark@uky.edu or UKAD Commission Chairs Misty Dotson at misty.dotson@uky.edu and Orvis Kean at Orvis.kean@uky.edu.

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

The Science Behind Snow's Serenity

Thu, 01/21/2016 - 14:36

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 21, 2016) — A thick blanket of snow covering streets, walkways and rooftops can cause some major stress, but it can also be sort of calming, right? Think about it — when it snows, the world gets quieter.

Is it because people dare not to venture outside? That could be part of it. But there's actually some science behind snow's serenity.  

"Snow is a pretty good sound absorber," said David Herrin, an associate professor in the UK College of Engineering who studies acoustics.

Herrin said snow absorbs sound a lot like many commercial sound absorbing materials  do, such as fibers and foams used in cars, HVAC systems and other equipment.

Sound absorption is measured on a scale between 0 and 1.

"In the audible range, a couple inches of snow is roughly around 0.6 or 60 percent absorbing on average," Herrin said. "Snow is porous, in some ways like a commercial sound absorbing foam."

Even during a snowfall, when flakes hit everything in their path, they barely make a sound, especially compared to rainfall. That's because snowflakes are not very dense and tend to drift to the ground.

"Rain drops, on the other hand, fall at higher velocities and strike the pavement. You are hearing impact noise," Herrin said. "With snow, the impact force is much less partly due to the reduced speed."

Of course, a winter storm with wind and sleet can cause many to forget snow's own serenity.

Listen to Herrin talk more about how snow makes the world quieter in an interview with WFPL at http://wfpl.org/why-is-it-so-quiet-after-it-snows/

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

Immunotherapy Research Leads to "Triple Play" for Sanders-Brown Researcher

Thu, 01/21/2016 - 14:23

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 25, 2016) — In the late 1990s, Donna Wilcock was exploring electrical activity in the epileptic brain as part of her undergraduate study in England, but her focus took an interesting turn as her studies into brain function deepened.  

"I began to wonder what, exactly, was going wrong in the brain as people developed dementia? What made them forget things?" said Wilcock. And that question bloomed into a career path focused on the triggers for a disease process that affects millions of people worldwide.

After stints in several university laboratories in the U.S., Wilcock was recruited to the University of Kentucky Sanders-Brown Center on Aging in 2011 and is now associate professor and the Sweeney-Nelms Professor in Alzheimer's Disease Research.

Wilcock's early graduate work in Alzheimer’s disease immunotherapy stimulated her interest in inflammation and vascular cognitive impairment. "I'm most curious about the role inflammation plays in the development of dementia, and about the vascular contribution to cognitive impairment," Wilcock said.

Her work in both areas has led to an interesting "triple play" that will help inform dementia research worldwide.

“It is a common misconception that dementia and Alzheimer’s disease are synonymous, however, just over half of all dementia (cases) are a result of Alzheimer’s disease. The second most common cause of dementia is vascular dementia,” Wilcock explained.  "Moreover, it is rare that we see pure Alzheimer’s disease without other issues."

Cerebrovascular disease and vascular dementia can be caused by anything from strokes and transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) to the more exotic sounding —  but more common —  white matter infarcts or chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. Wilcock shares the view of many of her colleagues that this mix of vascular dementia and Alzheimer’s disease might explain why many promising drugs to combat AD have failed in clinical trials.

"If you are testing a drug against a single disease, but a person has more than one disease with similar symptoms, the drug may appear to fail," she says. "It's the prevailing view that, for this reason, the best chance for beating AD and other dementias will be a cocktail of drugs."

But the research community's work has been hampered by the lack of a reliable animal model that mimicked co-morbid AD and vascular dementia.

Then, in 2010, Wilcock read about the Oxford University's VITACOG study, which looked into the role B vitamins play in brain shrinkage and cognition in the aging population. Other researchers had also found memory deficits in mice given a diet deficient in B vitamins.

Since B-vitamin deficiency leads to elevated levels of homocysteine in the blood, termed hyperhomocysteinemia, or Hhcy, Wilcock wondered whether HHcy might be a reliable model for vascular cognitive impairment. 

"The literature was suggesting a link between homocysteine and dementia incidence. Also, HHcy was already identified as a risk factor for stroke and cardiovascular disease,” said Wilcock.  "So I thought, perhaps if we induce HHcy in mice, and they subsequently showed signs of cognitive decline, this could model vascular cognitive impairment.'"

It worked.

"Our HHcy mice showed a markedly higher error rate completing spatial memory tasks, such as successfully navigating a radial arm water maze, compared to our control mice," said Wilcock. 

Wilcock describes the maze test as the human equivalent of remembering where you parked your car.  "The HHcy mice couldn't remember how to navigate the maze to find where their car was parked, so to speak, and also couldn't retain the information once they learned it, as evidenced by a reduced success rate on the second day of testing," she said.

Furthermore, since a mouse model for AD already existed, it was possible to create a model with both HHCy and AD by feeding mice with AD a diet deficient in B vitamins — in other words, a closer mimic to what happens in many humans with cognitive decline.

Developing this animal model was a double-whammy for Wilcock and her lab. First was the development of a reliable animal model for vascular dementia. But in doing so, "it appears that we might have found in homocysteine a modifiable biomarker for vascular dementia."

Why is that a big deal?

"It's currently possible to measure homocysteine levels with a simple blood draw," Wilcock said. "If we can demonstrate a causative connection between high homocysteine and cognitive decline, we could diagnose the second most common form of dementia with a blood test — and treat it with an inexpensive B vitamin supplement."

"Even better," she says, "we could perform relatively inexpensive routine screenings for hypohomocysteinemia and catch vascular dementia early, much like we do with mammography for breast cancer.

Wilcock is beginning to explore this possibility in collaboration with groups in the United Kingdom.

"Oxford University's OPTIMA study has collected annual homocysteine levels on many of their research participants, along with careful assessment of memory and ultimately tissue collection," she said.  "We hope we will be able to establish what, if any, brain pathologies are associated with a long-term HHcy, which is a logical next step in looking for treatments for people with both vascular cognitive impairment and AD."  

The third leg of Wilcock's "triple play" involves just that.

"We know that mixed dementias all have some form of immune influence, although the exact pathways aren't yet defined," Wilcock says.  She likens the idea to tuning a radio: as there are many types of inflammation — some good and some bad — the key is to find the exact "frequency" that maximizes the influence of good inflammation and minimizes the bad.

Wilcock points out that this is where the concept of personalized medicine can take shape. "If we can use simple biomarkers, like blood or imaging studies, to determine what specific processes are contributing to dementia, then we may be able to formulate a cocktail of agents that will modulate, or fine tune, these processes," she said. "This might be the Holy Grail of treatment for most types of cognitive impairment. Our mouse is an important first step in that direction."

UK Law Symposium Commemorating 50th Anniversary of Kentucky Civil Rights Act

Thu, 01/21/2016 - 14:04

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 25, 2015) — The Kentucky Civil Rights Act was signed into law on Jan. 27, 1966. Fifty years later, on Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016, the University of Kentucky College of Law and Kentucky Commission on Human Rights will commemorate the anniversary with a one-day law symposium.

The symposium, taking place at the Law Building, will consist of speakers and panelists including Kentucky’s lieutenant governor, judges, lawyers and activists prominent in the civil rights arena discussing general topics of interest. In addition, students and activists will be asked to participate by posing questions throughout the symposium.

"It is indeed a privilege for UK Law to serve as co-host of this momentous occasion celebrating a pivotal time in the history of the Commonwealth and nation," said UK College of Law Dean David A. Brennen. “This will be more than a day of reflection. Instead, we will engage in dialogue and a collaborative effort to keep our great state at the forefront in advancing equal rights for its vastly diverse citizenry.”

Registration begins at 8 a.m. and the symposium will conclude at 5:00 p.m. A full agenda is available here. Panel discussions will focus on life in Kentucky before the Kentucky Civil Rights Act, the promise of civil rights law and current civil rights issues.

Patricia Timmons-Goodson, vice chair of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights and nationally recognized scholar and jurist for civil rights, will deliver the keynote address at 11 a.m.

Prior to her appointment to the commission, Timmons-Goodson served as an associate justice on the Supreme Court of North Carolina from 2006 to 2012. She served as an associate judge on the North Carolina Court of Appeals from 1997 to 2005 and a district court judge of the Twelfth Judicial District of North Carolina from 1984 to 1997.

The presentation of the Georgia Davis Powers Legacy Award for Individuals and Agencies Devoted to the Cause of Furthering Human Rights Throughout the Commonwealth will conclude the symposium.

To register, visit http://law.uky.edu/academics/registration-civil-rights-act-symposium

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Harder, 859-323-2396, whitney.harder@uky.edu

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