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University Drive Traffic Impact to Start Jan. 18

Fri, 01/15/2016 - 15:32

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 15, 2016) — Starting on Monday, Jan. 18, traffic on University Drive on the University of Kentucky campus will be impacted by electrical infrastructure work taking place in the median. This project is scheduled to last until mid-May 2016.

Through traffic will be maintained at all times, with flagmen facilitating two-way vehicle traffic. Work will primarily take place between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m.

Both directions of University Drive traffic will be shifted to the right as needed between work hours and shifted back at the end of each day’s shift. The shift will include a dedicated bicycle lane. No daily lane closures will occur during inclement weather.

As many as five parking spaces may be temporarily unavailable during the project, on an as-needed basis.

The infrastructure work will not cause any planned deviations to campus or Lextran buses traveling on University Drive. However, riders should allow extra time in the event of traffic delays.

Members of the university community should allow extra time when traveling this section of campus.

UK Theatre to Present Dance Concert 'Shaping Space'

Fri, 01/15/2016 - 15:24
LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 19, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Department of Theatre and Dance's next production is sure to inspire and engage audiences. "Shaping Space," the UK Dance Program's annual production, will take center stage Jan. 29-31, at the Guignol Theatre.

Step into the theatre and prepare for the unexpected. Prepare to be energized. Prepare to be affected. Prepare to question. Prepare to connect. Prepare to experience a variety of works that celebrate the power of movement, grace and communication.

"Shaping Space" includes performances featuring the talents of UK dance minors presenting works by guest choreographers Missy Lay Zimmer and Andrew Hubbard; artistic directors of Exhale Dance Tribe; Stephanie Harris, UK dance instructor and director of Lexington Art League; Laurie Fields, dance instructor at the School for the Performing Arts (SCAPA); and Susie Thiel, director of the UK Dance Program.

"Shaping Space" dances onto the Guignol stage 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Jan. 29 and 30, and 2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 31. Tickets for the production are $15 for general admission and $10 for UK students with a valid ID through the Singletary Center box office. To purchase tickets, contact the box office at 859-257-4929, visit online at www.scfatickets.com or purchase in person during operating hours.

The UK Department of Theatre and Dance at UK College of Fine Arts has played an active role in the performance scene in Central Kentucky for more than 100 years. Students in the program get hands-on training and one-on-one mentorship from the renowned professional theatre faculty. The liberal arts focus of their bachelor's degree program is coupled with ongoing career counseling to ensure a successful transition from campus to professional life. 

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

"see blue." #selfie: Erica Shipley

Fri, 01/15/2016 - 15:23

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 19, 2016) — Want to get to know the people behind some of the biggest student leadership positions on campus? We did, too! That's why we're excited to introduce "see blue." #selfie  a brand new series on UKNow that lets student leaders from across campus tell us a little bit more about themselves and their organizations. Up first, the 2016 overall chair of DanceBlue, Erica Shipley.

Erica Shipley, a senior integrated strategic communication major from Washington D.C., serves as the 2015-16 DanceBlue overall chair. We sat down with Shipley to get to know the true student leader behind the DanceBlue title. This driven, passionate and spunky leader relays her passion "For the Kids" and for the university in her "see blue." #selfie! 

UKNow: What is your major and where are you from?

Erica Shipley: I'm a senior integrated strategic communication major with a minor in digital media and design and I'm from just outside of Washington D.C.

UK: When did you become involved with DanceBlue?

ES: September of freshman year. I started fundraising to be a dancer during that time for the 2013 marathon!

UK: Why are you so passionate about DanceBlue?

ES: I think it’s an amazing organization because it’s mutually beneficial. DanceBlue allows students to be involved in something bigger than themselves. Dancers get to partake in the celebration of life and watch the kids at the marathon forget about the worries of cancer. All parties involved are impacted. I also get to watch students grow into leaders and learn about themselves and how they can impact the world in other ways.

UK: What’s your most frequently used emoji? 

ES: The one with the big smile with eyes closed because it’s saying “eeee” and I do that a lot!  I also use the new thinking/pondering one. I use that instead of questions marks a lot.

UK: What are three things you consider essentials for any student on campus? 

ES: Your student I.D., an umbrella — with Kentucky weather you never know when it’s going to rain — and a phone charger because I find myself on campus very late.

UK: What is your favorite class you've ever taken at UK?

ES: I just finished it- ISC 497, which is a graphic design class. I loved learning about different ways to use the computer, and the professor gave us the flexibility to incorporate our own interests and ideas.  It made me excited to start doing work for the causes that I love! 

UK: Are there other organizations on campus that you’re involved in?

ES: I was vice president of Best Buddies for two years, which works to create friendships between students and adults in the community that have disabilities. I was chairman for Wrap Up America where I planned the fort building competition two years ago.

UK: When you’re studying late at Willy T., what Starbucks drink keeps you going? 

ES: Iced caramel macchiato with extra, extra, extra caramel!

UK: What’s one word you’re guilty of using too often? 

ES: Fabulous. Fab. Really any variation of fabulous. Maybe extra a’s added to the word or I say it high pitched. I definitely love that word.

UK: Growing up, what did you aspire to be?

ES: I always loved weddings. I wanted to be a professional wedding planner … ever since I was 13 that was all I wanted to be. I still might do it — we will see! I love weddings.  

UK: Favorite UK basketball player?

ES: Marcus Lee because he came to DanceBlue, and he is very supportive of the kids! He came and he didn’t want anything to be about him. He was in the talent show, and he really didn’t want anyone to know he was there. It was so cool! 

UK: Favorite thing you like to do off campus in the Lexington community? 

ES: I love to explore Lexington’s coffee shops! I have found some really good ones! While I love being on campus, sometimes finding a quiet spot off campus is good too. I just discovered Southland Perk on Southland Drive.

UK: Most memorable place you’ve joined in on a CATS cheer?

ES: So, sophomore year during DanceBlue the basketball team was playing against LSU. The game was really close and at the end everyone participating in DanceBlue did the CATS cheer and it was wonderful! 

UK: What is your favorite place on campus? 

ES: I love the area between White Hall, Lafferty and POT — the courtyard! We table there for DanceBlue all the time, and I love seeing students moving back and forth to classes. All of campus comes together at that one little spot at random times throughout the day. 

UK: What residence hall did you live in your freshman year? 

ES: Blanding IV (what, what?!). 

UK: What is one thing you know as a senior that you didn’t know as a freshman? 

ES: How many resources there are on campus for things other than education and classes. There are so many ways that you can learn about things that you wouldn’t normally, such as Leadership Exchange Ambassadors, the Center for Community Outreach and Student Activities Board. 

UK: What would you tell an incoming freshman? 

ES: Make as many friends as you can because they all bring something different to the college experience — whether it be about a new class you should take or having someone to go to a basketball game with. I have loved immersing myself in the culture of UK students. 

"see blue." #selfies will appear every other Tuesday on UKNow. Know a student leader we should feature? Contact Rebecca Stratton at rebecca.stratton@uky.edu to nominate someone.

Nunn Center Shares Collected 'Wisdom' Via Podcast Series

Fri, 01/15/2016 - 13:29

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 19, 2016) — The Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, a part of the University of Kentucky Libraries Special Collections Research Center, debuted a new podcast named "The Wisdom Project" in October 2015. This series of history related podcasts come from oral interviews and projects that have been carefully selected from the Nunn Center’s collection of nearly 10,000 interviews.

"With the surging popularity of podcasting, 'The Wisdom Project' seemed to be a natural progression for the Nunn Center," said Director Doug Boyd. Boyd and oral history archivist Kopana Terry have collaborated on this project in order to provide "a tremendous opportunity for people to truly listen to history in a way that is both educational as well as entertaining."

"The Wisdom Project" website will be updated frequently with changing podcast topics. There are currently three episodes published on the website, each with its own interesting story.

The first oral history interview of the series, titled "Episode #001: Interviewing Jackie O.," was conducted by current Dean of UK Libraries Terry Birdwhistell in 1981. Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis reminisces on her relationship with John Sherman Cooper, a long-time U.S. senator from Kentucky, and his wife, Lorraine. She also describes numerous social engagements she attended after the election of her husband John F. Kennedy as president of the United States in this personal interview.

"Episode #002: Original Recipe for a Kentucky Startup" of the podcast features a 1977 oral interview with the founder of Kentucky Fried Chicken, Kentucky native Colonel Harland Sanders, and explores the roots of the company’s humble beginnings. The colonel also gives advice on the importance of hard work and integrity in the business world. The podcast also discusses the purchase of the franchise in 1964 by John Y. Brown Jr. and its transition into the global marketplace.

In the two podcasts that make up "Episode #003: Veteran’s Stories: Remembering the D-Day Invasion," World War II veterans and Kentucky natives Louis Bowers and Jesse Beazley tell powerful accounts of the invasion of Normandy, France, in the summer of 1944. These interviews were conducted by William J. Marshall in 1985 and 1994, respectively. Louis Bowers, a member of the Fourth Infantry Division that spearheaded the invasion, talks about the misconceptions of D-Day alongside the impressive tact and skill of German soldiers. Jesse Beazley remembers his hopelessness of ever returning home and his intentional disconnection from fellow soldiers in light of their impending deaths. These interviews give life to the tragedy and chaos World War II soldiers faced every day.

The newest edition of the podcast features interviews with Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X. The two civil rights leaders spoke separately with writer Robert Penn Warren, but often referenced each other.

"Quite frankly, we’re having a great time producing 'The Wisdom Project,' so stay tuned for many more episodes to come," Boyd said. All of the podcasts are housed at the Louie B. Nunn Center in the Margaret I. King Library on the UK campus. The podcast can be found online at http://nunncenter.org/wisdomproject/ and is available on SoundCloud.

For more information regarding "The Wisdom Project," contact the Louie B. Nunn Center at 859-257-9672.

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

Stump Publishes New Linguistics Book

Fri, 01/15/2016 - 13:28

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 19, 2016) — Cambridge University Press recently published University of Kentucky linguistics Professor Gregory Stump’s new book, “Inflectional Paradigms: Content and Form at the Syntax-Morphology Interface.”

Stump examines mismatches between words' content and their form, drawing on evidence from a wide range of languages, including French, Hua, Hungarian, Kashmiri, Latin, Nepali, Noon, Old Norse, Sanskrit, Turkish, Twi and others.

Language students are often asked to memorize a word’s paradigm or its full inventory of inflected forms. Despite the educational usefulness of paradigms, linguists have sometimes dismissed them as having no real importance for understanding the structure of human languages. 

In his new book, however, Stump argues for the opposite conclusion, demonstrating that paradigms “serve indispensably to mediate between words’ grammatical function and their internal form.”

He draws particular attention to the variety of ways in which the form and function of inflected words can be “out of sync.”

“These mismatches between form and function provide crucial insights into the fundamental organization of human language,” he explained.

In his book, Stump proposes a theoretical architecture that provides a single, unified explanation for the range of apparent incongruities observable in these mismatches. He supports his conclusions with clear and precise analyses of morphological evidence from a number of languages, some of them relatively familiar, like French, Hungarian and Latin, and others quite unfamiliar, including the Hua language of New Guinea, the Sanskrit, Kashmiri and Nepali languages of South Asia, the Noon language of Senegal, and the Twi language of Ghana. 

The 22nd Breathitt Lecture to Explore Evolution of Pandora, and Woman, in Literature

Fri, 01/15/2016 - 12:37

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 19, 2016) — Claire K. Oldfather, a University of Kentucky classics and folklore and mythology senior from Madison, Alabama, has been selected to present the 22nd annual Edward T. Breathitt Undergraduate Lectureship in the Humanities at 7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 21, in the UK Athletics Auditorium at William T. Young Library. Oldfather's free public lecture focuses on the evolution of the Pandora motif and how woman has gone from being characterized as wondrous to a witch.

The Breathitt Lectureship was named for an outstanding UK alumnus who showed an exceptional interest in higher education and the humanities, Gov. Edward T. Breathitt. The lectureship is awarded to an undergraduate who has eloquently expressed the qualities of mind and spirit, including one or more of the basic concerns of the humanities. Each year all undergraduate students are invited to apply for the lectureship.

Oldfather's lecture, "How Pandora Traded Her Jar for a Cauldron: Tracing a Literary Motif from Hesiod to the Brothers Grimm" will explore a motif recurrent in Western literature that over time attributes the same constellation of characteristics to magic that it originally ascribes to women. Eventually, women’s magic nature came to be represented in literature not at a positive attribute, but as a dangerous and negative trait. Oldfather seeks to illustrate that calling women witches in the medieval period has natural roots in antiquity; the conception of woman from the classical world creates the witch of the modern one.

The research and lecture on the Pandora motif grew out of Oldfather's undergraduate research experience studying magic in antiquity.

"While researching conceptions of magic in antiquity with Dr. James Francis, I became fascinated with the recurrence of the same attributes associated with women," Oldfather said. "At the same time, I was taking a course with Dr. Linda Worley in which we studied the accusations against magic users in the Early Modern witch trials. The list of attributes and the list of accusations were the same. I was interested in the implications in an association between women and magic and chose to study it through my most familiar medium, literature."

The Breathitt Lectureship is presented by the Gaines Center for the Humanities, part of the Academy for Undergraduate Excellence within the UK Division of Undergraduate Education. As part of the lectureship, a student is given the opportunity to write and deliver a humanities-oriented public lecture on the topic of their choosing. The student speaker is chosen through an application process that includes a lecture proposal submitted by the student to an independent committee of readers.

In recognition of her selection to deliver the Breathitt Lectureship, Oldfather also will receive a commemorative award and a $500 honorarium.

Oldfather, the daughter of Dana and Duane Oldfather, is pursuing a double major of classics and the topical major folklore and mythology, as well as a minor in art history. She is also a member of the UK Honors Program. The Breathitt Scholar loves the breadth of topics she has been able to explore as part of her studies at UK.

"My freshman year of high school, a professor at a college I was visiting teasingly told me that I would have to choose something. I challenged that point and still do," Oldfather said. "The degrees I have chosen have allowed me rather interdisciplinary study. I have always loved history, literature, languages and art. It was the possibility of studying all of these together that drew me to the flexible and overarching classics degree. From that foundation, I branched out to study of the medieval world, especially its literature, through my folklore degree. Finally, as an archaeology student, I am interested in the visual and material culture of societies; thus the art history minor. Together my degrees enable me to study culture in multiple and nuanced ways."

Oldfather's studies have earned several honors, including membership in Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society and Eta Sigma Phi Classics Honor Society and the opportunity to present research at the Bluegrass Classics Undergraduate Conference at Transylvania University last fall. In addition, she has received a department excellence award for folklore and mythology studies from UK's Department of Modern and Classical Languages, Literatures and Cultures and three German Book Fest Awards.

Outside the classroom, Oldfather is a long-standing member and current president of Reformed University Fellowship. She has also worked as an intern and gallery attendant at the UK Art Museum. Additionally, she is a member of the service fraternity Alpha Phi Omega and has worked for UK's Office of Residence Life as a peer mentor for the iNET Living Learning Program. Over the summers, Oldfather has served as an area supervisor at archaeological field schools.

Upon completion of her undergraduate degree this May, Oldfather plans to pursue graduate studies in Celtic and medieval studies to prepare for a career as a professor.

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

MLK Day Celebration Speaker Danny Glover on WUKY's 'UK Perspectives'

Thu, 01/14/2016 - 21:38

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 15, 2015) — WUKY's "UK Perspectives" focuses on the people and programs of the University of Kentucky and is hosted by WUKY General Manager Tom Godell.  Sitting in for Godell today is Carl Nathe of UK Public Relations and Marketing.  He talks to actor and political activist Danny Glover, guest speaker at the Martin Luther King Jr. Day Celebration Monday, Jan. 18, sponsored by UK and Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government. 

"UK Perspectives" airs at 8:45 a.m. and 5:45 p.m. each Friday on WUKY 91.3, UK's NPR station.

27th Annual UK Economic Outlook Conference is Feb. 2

Thu, 01/14/2016 - 17:39

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan.  15, 2016)  Will Kentucky and the U.S. add jobs in 2016? What actions can we expect from the Federal Reserve in the coming months? What about the outlook for the stock market? These are just a few of the questions and topics that will be addressed Tuesday, Feb. 2, as the University of Kentucky hosts its 27th Annual Economic Outlook Conference in downtown Lexington.

The event is hosted by the Don and Cathy Jacobs Executive Education Center at UK's Gatton College of Business and Economics, along with the Center for Business and Economic Research (CBER). Commerce Lexington and The Lane Report again are serving as presenting sponsors, and the Lexington-Bluegrass Association of Realtors (lbar.com), Louisville Business First, and the Cincinnati Business Courier have signed on as partner sponsors this year.

The Lexington Convention Center is the event site with registration and continental breakfast from 8 to 8:30 a.m., and the conference itself from 8:30 to 12 noon. 

Expert speakers and presenters include:

·         Mark E. Schweitzer, senior vice president of external outreach and regional analytics for the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. Schweitzer's talk is titled "A View from the Federal Reserve."

·         Christopher R. Bollinger, director of UK's Center for Business and Economic Research (CBER) and Gatton Endowed Professor of Economics in the Gatton College. Bollinger will speak on the "Economic Outlook for 2016: National and Local Relationships."

·         Jenny A. Minier, director of graduate studies and professor of economics in the Gatton College. Minier will address "International Effects on the Kentucky Economy."

·         David O'Neill, property valuation administrator, Fayette County, will talk about "Real Estate in the Bluegrass and Kentucky."

"This annual conference is a wonderful opportunity for business leaders and other interested citizens to hear from experts on a range of issues impacting our economy," said David W. Blackwell, dean of the Gatton College. "The event always is compelling and extremely informative."

Audience participation will be an important part of the event in the form of question and answer sessions.  

Early registration is recommended for the 27th Annual Economic Outlook conference and can be done online. The registration fee of $115 includes continental breakfast and all materials.  For groups of five or more, a discounted registration fee of $100 per person is offered.

For more information, visit http://www.gatton.uky.edu/eec.

MEDIA CONTACTS: Carl Nathe, 859-257-3200; carl.nathe@uky.edu; Ann Mary Quarandillo, 859-257-0750; annmary.q@uky.edu.

UK Study Calls for Closer Examination of Transitional Care Management Program Effectiveness

Thu, 01/14/2016 - 17:31

Lexington, Ky. (Jan. 15, 2016) — Reducing excessive medical costs associated with high hospital readmission rates is a pillar of health care reform. From 2007 to 2011, as many as 19 percent of patients in the United States returned to hospitals less than a month after discharge, accounting for an estimated $15 million in preventable hospitalization costs.

In an effort to prevent adverse outcomes for chronically ill and aging patients and reduce the burden of cost on the government, Medicare providers have implemented transitional care management programs (TCMs) as a bundled component of Medicare payment plans. TCMs comprise a broad set of services and interventions designed to ease the transition from a hospital to community-based care and prevent the recurrence of hospital admission for patients with complex medical needs. Beginning in 2013, patients became eligible for Medicare reimbursement for TCM services, such as outpatient visits and adherence to treatment assessments. 

A systematic review conducted by faculty members in the University of Kentucky Division of Community Medicine of the Department of Family and Community Medicine found that the majority of TCM programs are ineffective in meeting criteria to serve the needs of the patients intended to receive transitional services. Led by first author Karen Roper and senior investigator Roberto Cardarelli, chief of the Division of Community Medicine, the research team culled peer-reviewed journal articles reporting the readmission rates of adults receiving the TCM bundle of services and published between 2004 and 2015. The purpose of the study was to assess the state of research monitoring the effectiveness of fully reimbursable TCM visits in reducing hospital readmission rates.

The research team identified 969 studies reporting readmission rates for TCM service recipients, but 77 of those studies met the inclusion criteria to be considered relevant for transitional care and appropriateness of population and setting. Only three articles incorporated all required elements of TCM service. Although two of the three TCM studies were improvement designs and none were randomized controlled studies, each reported success reducing readmission rates, contributing limited evidence that TCMs are effective in reducing hospital readmission. Based on these results, the researchers called for additional studies examining the implementation of TCMS.

“The few identified studies through our systematic review show promising efficacy data on the impact of TCM visits on hospital readmission rates. However, it also highlights that effectiveness studies are needed to further understand its impact in real-world settings and what attributes of the TCM process cause this impact,” Cardarelli said. 

The results were published in an article appearing in the January issue of the American Journal of Medical Quality.

MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Adams, elizabethadams@uky.edu

Two UK Performers Join Danny Glover at MLK Day Celebration

Thu, 01/14/2016 - 16:25

From Media Collaboratory on Vimeo.

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 15, 2016) — Two local performers will share the stage with actor, director, producer, humanitarian and political activist Danny Glover at Lexington's 2016 Martin Luther King Jr. Day celebration.

Two representatives of the University of Kentucky will be part of the day’s ceremonies. Miss Kentucky Clark J. Davis, a sophomore at UK, and Cliff Jackson, associate professor of vocal coaching at UK Opera Theatre, will inspire and entertain the locals commemorating the memory of America’s most honored human rights advocate.

This will not be the pageant winner’s first local King Day celebration, only her first time on that particular stage. A Lexington native, Davis, 18, is a graduate of the School for the Creative and Performing Arts at Lafayette High School. She studies vocal performance with Everett McCorvey, UK professor of voice and director and executive producer of the UK Opera Theatre.

Cited for his sensitive accompaniments and insightful musicianship, Jackson has been recognized as a leading pianist of his generation. He has been the pianist for many internationally renowned artists, including Kathleen Battle, Renato Scotto, Simon Estes, Edda Moser, Felicia Weathers and Gwendolyn Bradley. Classical Singer's 2009 Vocal Coach of the Year, Jackson has also gained a wide reputation as an outstanding coach of vocal repertoire ranging in scope from the baroque to 20-century opera. On UK’s School of Music faculty since 1992, he is currently associate professor of vocal coaching at UK Opera Theatre.

Presented by the University of Kentucky and the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government, Monday’s events begin at 10 a.m. with the traditional Freedom March through the streets of downtown Lexington, followed by the commemorative program at 11 a.m. in Heritage Hall, featuring Glover as the keynote speaker.

Many know Glover only in his roles in the entertainment industry. With a career spanning more than 30 years, he is indeed one of the most respected actors working today. He is arguably best known for his roles as Detective Sergeant Roger Murtaugh in the "Lethal Weapon" series, as Albert Johnson in "The Color Purple," as cowboy Mal Johnson in "Silverado," and Michael Herrigan in "Predator 2." He also had roles in "Witness," "Shooter," "Saw," "Places in the Heart" and "Angels in the Outfield" as well as dozens of other movies, television shows and theatrical productions.

But it’s the other face of Glover that Lexington will see Jan. 18.

“Every day of my life I walk with the idea I am black no matter how successful I am,” Glover has said.

Born to San Francisco postal workers active in the NAACP, Glover's activism first became apparent at San Francisco State University, where he joined the Black Students Union and led the longest student walkout in U.S. history, a five-month strike to establish a Department of Black Studies. The students succeeded when a department and a school of ethnic studies were created, the first of their kind at an American university.

Understandably, Glover inherited his parents’ convictions about union activism as well. He has supported the United Farm Workers, UNITE HERE and the American Postal Workers Union. Internationally, Glover has served as a Goodwill Ambassador for the United Nations Development Program, focusing on issues of poverty, disease and economic development in Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean. He currently serves as a UNICEF Ambassador and is the recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award from Amnesty International.

Martin Luther King Jr. Day Celebration activities continue later Monday afternoon with a free showing of “Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom” at the Kentucky Theatre at 2:30 p.m.

Meanwhile, the MLK Day of Service, coordinated by UK's Center for Community Outreach Martin Luther King Jr. Wildcats for Service, will take place from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 16. Students and employees should sign up through Volunteer Match to volunteer with the event. The official starting point for the day is Manchester Music Hall, located at 899 Manchester St., Lexington.

The MLK Wildcats for Service group has partnered with organizations around Lexington to provide volunteer sites for those participating in the MLK Day of Service.  There are 15 sites total, including the St. Agnes House, Lighthouse Ministries, the Catholic Action Center, Habitat for Humanity plus many others

Presented by the University of Kentucky, the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government and other community partners, all events are free and open to the public.

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

Wildcats for Service Host MLK Day of Service

Thu, 01/14/2016 - 16:17

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan 15, 2016)  Martin Luther King Jr. Day is a federal holiday held on the third Monday of January every year.  This holiday celebrates the legacy of the influential American civil rights leader. It is seen as a day to promote equal rights for all Americans, regardless of their background.

In celebration of King, people across the nation come together to participate in service activities that positively impact different aspects of their community — the Martin Luther King Day of Service.  For the fourth year, the University of Kentucky, presented by Center for Community Outreach Martin Luther King Jr. Wildcats for Service, is offering a service opportunity for students and employees, as part of the MLK Day celebration.

"I am so excited for MLK Day of Service this weekend,"  said Natalie Malone, Martin Luther King Jr. Wildcats for Service director. "My team has been working very hard with our community partners, the Center for Community Outreach, the MLK Center and our campus community to make sure Saturday is impactful and inspiring."

Wildcats for Service is a newly constructed student organization out of the Center for Community Outreach that came about this year.  The organization strives to promote Martin Luther King Jr.'s legacy by encouraging not only one national day of service, but 365 days of service.

The Wildcats for Service has partnered with organizations around Lexington to provide volunteer sites for those participating in the MLK Day of Service.  There are 15 sites total, including the St. Agnes House, Lighthouse Ministries, the Catholic Action Center, Habitat for Humanity plus many others.

"The program has grown immensely over the course of the semester through various service events and conversations," Malone said. "Our partnership with the MLK Center has also immensely strengthened, which proves beneficial to both parties as we have the same goal. I hope this year will serve as a catalyst for the years to come!"

MLK Day of Service will take place from 9 a.m. to 1 p.mSaturday, Jan. 16. Students and employees should sign up through Volunteer Match to volunteer with the event. The official starting point for the day is Manchester Music Hall, located at 899 Manchester St., Lexington.  

Parking will be available on site. For students living on campus, transportation will be provided via shuttle service. Morning and evening pick up and drop off locations will be at Bowman's statue and the William T. Young Library.

Free food and a T-shirt will be provided at the event.

MLK Jr. Wildcats for Service is a program housed in the UK Center for Community Outreach. The CCO seeks to serve, connect and unite the University of Kentucky with the surrounding community in collaborative efforts to promote life-long community service.

For more information, email mlkwildcatsforservice.ukcco@gmail.com or call 270-791-1463.

MEDIA CONTACT: Katy Bennett or Rebecca Stratton, katy.bennett@uky.edu or rebecca.stratton@uky.edu, (859) 257-1909/(859) 323-2395 

SCAPA Students Perform MLK Concert at UK Hospital Pavilion

Thu, 01/14/2016 - 16:10

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 15, 2016) — Students from the School of Creative and Performing Arts (SCAPA) will perform a free Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration concert in the Pavilion A Atrium of the UK Chandler Hospital on Friday, Jan. 15.

The celebration blends spiritual songs, such as "Oh Freedom," with Martin Luther King Jr. readings, choreographed movement and theatrical performance. This year marks the fifth year a group of SCAPA middle schoolers will perform a Martin Luther King Jr. memorial concert at the hospital atrium.

The SCAPA students have performed concerts with the Lexington Philharmonic and at Alltech's Annual Symposium. Coordinated by the UK Arts in HealthCare program, the celebration begins and 12 p.m. and is open to the public.

MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Adams, elizabethadams@uky.edu  

Faculty Input Sought for Proposed Center for Equality and Social Justice

Thu, 01/14/2016 - 13:45

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 15, 2016) — A team of faculty from across campus have developed an initial proposal to create a University of Kentucky Center for Equality and Social Justice. 

Inspired and led by psychology Associate Professor Chrisitia Spears Brown with Robert E. Harding Jr. Professor of Law Melynda J. Price, the goal of the center is to create a space on campus to explore issues of equality and social justice from multiple perspectives, disciplines and research traditions. 

The genesis of the center comes at a time when institutions across the country are debating issues of equality, diversity and inclusion.

At UK, those conversations are taking place across the campus among faculty, students and staff, allowing for real opportunities for greater change. Brown, Price and other involved faculty believe the creation of such a center -- from colleges across the campus -- will further allow the university to harness the collective expertise of its faculty in driving positive changes for a more inclusive culture and society.

Late last semester, Brown and Price posed their idea to Mark Kornbluh, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, who responded with enthusiastic support. Kornbluh presented the idea to Terry Allen, interim vice president for institutional diversity, who offered his endorsement for efforts to develop the Center for Equality and Social Justice that would involve members of the UK community, colleges and departments from across the campus.

UK faculty are now invited to review the collaborative efforts of Brown and Price at 2:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 19, in the Alumni Gallery of William T. Young Library. ( http://uknow.uky.edu/content/center-equality-and-social-justice-proposal-0). This initial proposal is a starting point for further discussions and as part of a process to reach out to faculty, staff and, ultimately, students across the campus to be involved in the potential center.

The center’s premise is the “urgent need for high quality scholarship from a diverse set of disciplines and viewpoints addressing the causes, consequences and possible solutions to continued social inequality.

“That scholarship then needs to be translated for policymakers and legal experts, so that research can more effectively shape how social justice is enacted,” wrote Brown and Price in the recommendation for a center.

"A multidisciplinary approach to issues of social justice and equality involving faculty, staff and students from every corner of the campus speaks to who we are and what is distinctive about UK as a flagship, land-grant institution," said Tim Tracy, UK provost. "Only a community like UK can examine these issues in all their complexities and dimensions and bring people together in a way that both discusses and upholds our values."

The proposal recognizes the need for improved dialogue with the campus at large and the local and state community to better improve how scholarship is conducted with the goal of greater social justice for community members. 

It also recognizes that UK is uniquely positioned in the Commonwealth with existing strengths to study and offer solutions addressing inequality and promoting social justice on the basis of race/ethnicity, immigration status, gender, sexual orientation and gender identity, religion, and class.

Consequently, a primary goal of the center will be to facilitate connections and foster dialogue between individual scholars, programs, centers and departments already established at UK.

"The concept of establishing a University of Kentucky Center for Equality and Social Justice supports our institution’s values and strategic objective to enhance diversity and inclusivity, and to become an institution that is welcoming and mutually respects the contribution of every member of our community," said Allen. "Ultimately, the benefit has far reaching potential for everyone, particularly populations often marginalized."

The proposal endorses collaboration with the Martin Luther King Center, the Center for Research on Violence Against Women, the Office of Policy Studies on Violence Against Women, the Center for Poverty Research, and Quantitative Initiative of Policy and Social Research as well as other programs and departments focusing on inequality and social justice throughout the university.

"There are so many outstanding faculty and students at UK doing critical work in the pursuit of equity and social justice for everyone. This center will recognize, support and encourage that innovative work, and will foster connections between faculty, students and the community," Brown said. "As a society, equal rights for all is still a dream deferred, and we need the brightest and most thoughtful minds working together, each bringing their own voice and perspective, to achieve true social justice. The goal of the center will be to facilitate that pursuit."

"This type of center would put UK at the forefront of both interdisciplinary research in this area and socially engaged scholarship," Price said. "Dr. Christia Brown’s past research and current leadership on this project is the first signal of the good work to come. As a university, we train students for various professions, but also as importantly, we produce strong citizens. This center’s aim to merge the research and service goals of the university will only benefit students and the Commonwealth in the long run."

The proposal outlines the future potential for colloquia, a speaker series, a scholar-in-residence, graduate and undergraduate student fellowships, graduate and undergraduate courses, mini-grants, workshops, and community engagement. The Center for Equality and Social Justice would be housed in the College of Arts and Sciences with a multi-disciplinary, diverse advisory board of faculty, researchers and directors of related centers, programs and departments.

The board would also include graduate and undergraduate student representatives. Thirty faculty have already expressed interest in affiliating with the center, but hopes are to include as many as 20 more.

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

Successful Indie Film Would Not Exist Without John Winn Miller

Thu, 01/14/2016 - 11:02

LEXINGTON, KY (Jan. 15, 2015)  John Winn Miller, journalist-in-residence for the University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information, appears in only one scene in the new indie film "Band of Robbers." However, Miller filled multiple roles behind-the-scenes that made him a valuable part of the film production.

Miller, a screenwriter and film enthusiast, wore many hats during the film's production. His title was executive producer, positioned just under producer John Will of Torn Sky Entertainment in the hierarchy. Often executive producers are must less involved than Miller was.

Not only did Miller fill the executive producer role, he was always present on set.  The production schedule had the cast and crew filming for six weeks, 12 hours a day, six days per week in September 2014. Miller never missed a moment.

“I hung around on the set whenever they were shooting and just did whatever I could to help,” Miller said. “And it was a magical experience.”

He helped with set maintenance, assisted actors, moved equipment to set and went above and beyond expectations to help ensure the film’s success.

“Whether that was doing a coffee run or driving actors around, he did it, and humbly,” director and lead actor Adam Nee said. “This is coming from a guy who put money in the movie! That's incredibly rare, and speaks volumes about his character and passion.”

Both Will and Nee responded similarly when asked about Miller’s contributions.  Simply put, the film would not exist without him.

“He volunteered help over and over and over, and even when we were on set, he was always the one doing the little things,” Nee said. “He was always the first to volunteer to help with absolutely any task.”

In addition to his position as executive producer, Miller and his wife invested financially when the film needed it most.

“He stepped up as a backer when we were at a crisis point of having a portion of the requisite budget but not enough to make the film,” Will said. “We were facing the grim prospect of pulling the plug on the project, and John came to the rescue allowing us to proceed."

Miller is devoted to this film because he loves it. "Band of Robbers" is the brainchild of his son-in-law Adam Nee and his brother Aaron Nee. Miller has witnessed its development first-hand since the initial idea was conceived 10 years ago.

“I read the script,” Miller said. “In fact, I watched him write it on vacation, and it was a brilliant script, just brilliant, so I said, ‘I want in.’ And I thought, ‘it will be one of the best things I’ve ever done.’”

Miller’s intuition about the script proved to be correct. "Band of Robbers" premiered at the Los Angeles Film Festival last year.

“We went to the LA Film Festival — that’s where we premiered — and got rave reviews and had a second showing at a much bigger theater,” Miller said.

All audiences enjoyed the film, which is what encouraged the unexpected second showing.

“The thing that I loved most about our LA Film Fest screenings was discovering how broad the audience for this film is — there were teens, twenty-somethings and senior citizens all enjoying the film and raving about it,” Will said.

"Band of Robbers" is a modern adaptation of Mark Twain’s novels.

“The concept is that it’s a modern re-telling of Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer as petty criminals looking for the big score, which is Murrel's treasure, the fabled treasure, that they’d always been searching for as kids,” Miller explained. “It’s a really sweet story, a friendship. Tom and Huck had been childhood friends who had been looking out after each other but they were always going out on these crazy adventures.”

Mark Twain enthusiasts and novices alike will enjoy this film.

“Anybody who likes Mark Twain or Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer, you’ll watch the movie and you’ll see all these subtle references to it,” Miller said. “We got a lot of giggles from people who recognized it. But, everybody who’s seen it has really loved it.”

Miller is not new to the film industry.  He’s written several scripts and screenplays and has produced two other films, "Hitting the Cycle" and "Armed Response."  "Band of Robbers", however, is the first to go to theaters.

"Band of Robbers" will premier in select theaters across the country and be released on video on demand services today, Jan. 15. Shortly after its January premier, the film will be available for streaming on Netflix.

"Band of Robbers" will also be shown at 7:30 p.m. Wedensday, Feb. 3, at the Kentucky Theater in Lexington.  Adam Nee and Miller will host a question and answer session after the film’s showing at the Kentucky Theater.  For more information and to purchase tickets, visit kybandofrobbers.com

The film's trailer can be found here.

To keep up with the film, visit bandofrobbers.com or check out the social media accounts listed below.

Facebook.com/bandofrobbersfilm

Instagram: @bandofrobbers

Twitter: @Band_of_Robbers

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, (859) 257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

UK Bookstore Introduces Price Matching Program

Thu, 01/14/2016 - 10:13

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 15, 2015)  As the new semester begins, students are searching and comparing prices of textbooks at various retail locations. The UK Bookstore is now offering a price matching program. The UK Bookstore will price match the exact textbook, in the same edition and format, including all accompanying materials, like workbooks and CDs.

"The price match program is just the latest initiative in our efforts to ensure UK students have access to the most affordable course materials to ensure academic success. If you find a lower price on your textbook within seven days of your purchase from the UK Bookstore, we will refund you the difference," said UK Bookstore General Manager Dave Lang.

Price matching includes used, new and rental textbooks. The rental term periods must be the same. Digital books and special orders are not eligible for price matching.

Online retailers such as Amazon, Chegg and BN.com are eligible for price match. Online marketplaces, however, like "Other Sellers" on Amazon and BN.com Marketplace, as well as peer-to-peer pricing, are not eligible.

A textbook is only eligible for price match if it is in stock on a competitor's website
at the time of the price match request.

Additional membership discounts and offers cannot be applied to your refund.

Lang said, "We believe our price matching program is a great complement to our extensive textbook rental program which enables students to rent new, used or digital textbooks."

MEDIA CONTACT: Blair Hoover, (859) 257-6398; blair.hoover@uky.edu

Faculty Input Sought for Proposed Center for Equality and Social Justice at UK

Wed, 01/13/2016 - 17:27

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 15, 2016) — A team of faculty from across campus have developed an initial proposal to create a University of Kentucky Center for Equality and Social Justice. 

Inspired and led by psychology Associate Professor Chrisitia Spears Brown with Robert E. Harding Jr. Professor of Law Melynda J. Price, the goal of the center is to create a space on campus to explore issues of equality and social justice from multiple perspectives, disciplines and research traditions. 

The genesis of the center comes at a time when institutions across the country are debating issues of equality, diversity and inclusion.

At UK, those conversations are taking place across the campus among faculty, students and staff, allowing for real opportunities for greater change. Brown, Price and other involved faculty believe the creation of such a center -- from colleges across the campus -- will further allow the university to harness the collective expertise of its faculty in driving positive changes for a more inclusive culture and society.

Late last semester, Brown and Price posed their idea to Mark Kornbluh, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, who responded with enthusiastic support. Kornbluh presented the idea to Terry Allen, interim vice president for institutional diversity, who offered his endorsement for efforts to develop the Center for Equality and Social Justice that would involve members of the UK community, colleges and departments from across the campus.

UK faculty are now invited to review the collaborative efforts of Brown and Price at 2:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 19, in the Alumni Gallery of William T. Young Library. See full proposal at http://uknow.uky.edu/content/center-equality-and-social-justice-proposal-0. This initial proposal is a starting point for further discussions and as part of a process to reach out to faculty, staff and, ultimately, students across the campus to be involved in the potential center.

The center’s premise is the “urgent need for high quality scholarship from a diverse set of disciplines and viewpoints addressing the causes, consequences and possible solutions to continued social inequality.

“That scholarship then needs to be translated for policymakers and legal experts, so that research can more effectively shape how social justice is enacted,” wrote Brown and Price in the recommendation for a center.

"A multidisciplinary approach to issues of social justice and equality involving faculty, staff and students from every corner of the campus speaks to who we are and what is distinctive about UK as a flagship, land-grant institution," said Tim Tracy, UK provost. "Only a community like UK can examine these issues in all their complexities and dimensions and bring people together in a way that both discusses and upholds our values."

The proposal recognizes the need for improved dialogue with the campus at large and the local and state community to better improve how scholarship is conducted with the goal of greater social justice for community members. 

It also recognizes that UK is uniquely positioned in the Commonwealth with existing strengths to study and offer solutions addressing inequality and promoting social justice on the basis of race/ethnicity, immigration status, gender, sexual orientation and gender identity, religion, and class.

Consequently, a primary goal of the center will be to facilitate connections and foster dialogue between individual scholars, programs, centers and departments already established at UK.

"The concept of establishing a University of Kentucky Center for Equality and Social Justice supports our institution’s values and strategic objective to enhance diversity and inclusivity, and to become an institution that is welcoming and mutually respects the contribution of every member of our community," said Allen. "Ultimately, the benefit has far reaching potential for everyone, particularly populations often marginalized."

The proposal endorses collaboration with the Martin Luther King Center, the Center for Research on Violence Against Women, the Office of Policy Studies on Violence Against Women, the Center for Poverty Research, and Quantitative Initiative of Policy and Social Research as well as other programs and departments focusing on inequality and social justice throughout the university.

"There are so many outstanding faculty and students at UK doing critical work in the pursuit of equity and social justice for everyone. This center will recognize, support and encourage that innovative work, and will foster connections between faculty, students and the community," Brown said. "As a society, equal rights for all is still a dream deferred, and we need the brightest and most thoughtful minds working together, each bringing their own voice and perspective, to achieve true social justice. The goal of the center will be to facilitate that pursuit."

"This type of center would put UK at the forefront of both interdisciplinary research in this area and socially engaged scholarship," Price said. "Dr. Christia Brown’s past research and current leadership on this project is the first signal of the good work to come. As a university, we train students for various professions, but also as importantly, we produce strong citizens. This center’s aim to merge the research and service goals of the university will only benefit students and the Commonwealth in the long run."

The proposal outlines the future potential for colloquia, a speaker series, a scholar-in-residence, graduate and undergraduate student fellowships, graduate and undergraduate courses, mini-grants, workshops, and community engagement. The Center for Equality and Social Justice would be housed in the College of Arts and Sciences with a multi-disciplinary, diverse advisory board of faculty, researchers and directors of related centers, programs and departments.

The board would also include graduate and undergraduate student representatives. Thirty faculty have already expressed interest in affiliating with the center, but hopes are to include as many as 20 more.

MEDIA CONTACT: Gail Hairston, 859-257-3302, gail.hairston@uky.edu

UK's Rachel Shane Named Editor-in-Chief of Arts Journal

Wed, 01/13/2016 - 16:24

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 14, 2016)Rachel Shane, director of the University of Kentucky's Arts Administration Program, has been named editor-in-chief of the Journal of Arts Management, Law, and Society.

The Journal of Arts Management, Law, and Society is the authoritative resource for arts policymakers and analysts, sociologists, arts and cultural administrators, educators, trustees, artists, lawyers and citizens concerned with the performing, visual and media arts, as well as cultural affairs. Articles, commentaries and reviews of publications address marketing, intellectual property, arts policy, arts law, governance, and cultural production and dissemination from a variety of philosophical, disciplinary, and national and international perspectives.

In addition to serving as director of the UK Arts Administration Program, Shane teaches courses on marketing, financial management, fundraising, nonprofit management and legal issues in the arts in both the bachelor's and master's degree programs. Prior to joining UK College of Fine Arts, she served as department head and professor of arts administration at the Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD), where she established the arts administration department and grew it to the fourth largest graduate program at the college. At SCAD, Shane led the design and creation of three degree programs and an undergraduate minor in arts and entertainment management.

Shane currently serves as a board member for the Association of Arts Administration Educators. In 2012, she served as the conference chair for the 37th annual international Social Theory, Politics and the Arts Conference. She is also the co-founder of MasterMinds Agency, a national consulting firm for nonprofit organizations.

As an arts administrator, Shane has also served in a variety of capacities in the field. She previously served as managing director of the Elm Shakespeare Company in New Haven, Connecticut; associate director of education at the Delaware Theatre Company; and as the theatre for young audiences tour director and theatre summer camp director for the Hippodrome State Theatre in Gainesville, Florida.

Shane holds an associate's degree from the American Academy of Dramatic Arts, a bachelor's degree in theatre from Northern Arizona University, a master' degree in arts administration from Drexel University, and doctoral degree in cultural policy and arts administration from Ohio State University

UK's Arts Administration Program, in the UK College of Fine Arts, is designed to prepare students for a future in the management of arts organizations. Students are provided with a strong liberal arts education, an understanding of the business world, and a comprehensive education in one of the four arts disciplines of art, music, dance and theatre.

MEDIA CONTACT: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716; whitney.hale@uky.edu

AHEC Summer Camp Applications Open to High School Sophomore, Juniors Interested in Health Careers

Wed, 01/13/2016 - 16:07

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 14, 2016) The University of Kentucky Area Health Education Center (AHEC) is now accepting applications for its 2016 Summer Health Career programs for high school-age students aspiring to enter the health profession. 

AHEC will host a four-week Summer Enrichment Program on the University of Kentucky campus from June 19 to July 15, 2016. Students accepted into the Summer Enrichment Program will observe and learn from UK faculty members, health professionals and health profession students. Students will attend classes in biology, chemistry and physics. The Summer Enrichment Program is open to current high school sophomores and is designed to provide students with insight into college life. 

The Health Researchers Youth Academy is a two-week program also held on the University of Kentucky campus beginning July 5 and ending July 15.  The Health Researchers Youth Academy provides students an opportunity to learn about health care research and to understand some of the requirements for majors leading to a career in those fields. Students accepted into the program will attend classes in physiology, observe research model presentations by UK faculty, and complete a literature review leading to the development and production of a health research poster presentation to be displayed at the closing ceremony.  The Health Researchers Youth Academy is open to current high school juniors.

Both the Summer Enrichment Program and the Health Researchers Youth Academy are residential camps designed to increase the number of disadvantaged and under-represented students who pursue educational programs and careers in the health professions. There is no cost to students to enroll and attend the summer programs. Housing and meals are provided. For more information contact Michael Witt, UK health careers coordinator, at 859-323-1378 or Michael.Witt@uky.edu

To complete the online application, click here. To be considered, applicants must be a resident of Kentucky and all applicant material must be completed and submitted by March 25, 2016.  

MEDIA CONTACT: Elizabeth Adams, elizabethadams@uky.edu

Williams Named to Editorial Advisory Board of Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety

Wed, 01/13/2016 - 14:55

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 14, 2016) – Dr. Mark V. Williams, professor and vice chair in the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Kentucky, has been named to the advisory board of The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety. The Joint Commission Journal is a monthly peer-reviewed journal that provides both empirical studies and practical instructions on how to understand and implement interventions to improve patient safety and quality.

At UK, Williams also serves as chief transformation and learning officer for the UK HealthCare and director of the Center for Health Services Research.

Williams graduated from Emory University School of Medicine and completed a residency in Internal Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital. He also completed a Faculty Development Fellowship in General Medicine at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, the Woodruff Leadership Academy at Emory, the Program in Palliative Care Education and Practice at Harvard and the Advance Training Program in Health Care Delivery Improvement sponsored by Intermountain Healthcare's Institute for Health Care Delivery Research.

Williams established the first hospitalist program for a public hospital in 1998 at Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta and built two of the largest academic hospitalist programs in the U.S. at Emory (1998-2007) and Northwestern (2007-2013) Universities. As chief of the Division of Hospital Medicine at UK HealthCare he has doubled the faculty of the unit since 2014 to 60 clinicians. A past president of the Society of Hospital Medicine (SMH) and the founding editor of the Journal of Hospital Medicine, he actively promotes the role of hospitalists as leaders in delivery of health care to hospitalized patients.

He has been quoted in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal and Consumer Reports. Notably, he also serves as principal investigator for SHM’s Project BOOST (Better Outcomes by Optimizing Safe Transitions). Grant funding from The John A. Hartford Foundation, BlueCross BlueShield of Illinois and other foundations, supported dissemination of Project BOOST to nearly 200 hospitals across the U.S. In 2015, he became principal investigator on Project ACHIEVE (Achieving Patient-Centered Care and Optimized Health In Care Transitions by Evaluating the Value of Evidence), funded with a $15 million contract from PCORI.

With a history of more than $29 million in grants and contracts as principal or co-principal investigator and more than 130 peer-reviewed publications including in journals such as JAMA, New England Journal of Medicine and Annals of Internal Medicine, Williams’ research focuses on quality improvement, care transitions, teamwork and the role of health literacy in the delivery of health care.  

Media Contact: Ann Blackford at 859-323-6442 or ann.blackford@uky.edu

World-class Artwork to Grace New Gatton College Building

Wed, 01/13/2016 - 10:43

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 14, 2016) — Through a juried selection process led by the University of Kentucky Gatton College of Business and Economics, in coordination with the UK College of Fine Arts, three major works of art by two faculty members and one graduate student in the School of Art and Visual Studies (SA/VS) have been selected to adorn the new Gatton College building on the west side of the UK campus.

Thanks to the Garry Knapp Endowment shared between the College of Fine Arts and the Gatton College of Business and Economics, a fund that is used primarily by Gatton College to make art purchases from SA/VS faculty and graduate students, the expansion of the Gatton College building provided an opportunity to commission three large works for the new atrium in the Gatton building. The requested artwork includes: a large mural-sized work, a suspended sculpture in the main atrium, and a design for a window arcade on the first floor of the atrium. 

A special jury was set up last spring to organize and jury a special competition for these commissions.  The jury consisted of Kenneth Troske, senior associate dean, Gatton College of Business and Economics; Stuart Horodner, director of the UK Art Museum; and Stephanie Harris, executive director of the Lexington Art League and instructor at UK Department of Theatre and Dance. They judged more than 30 project proposals by SA/VS faculty and graduate students for the three art works.

The winning window arcade design by graduate student Tianlan Deng was the first art to be selected. Tianlan, a student from Shanghai, drew on inspiration from his home country for his winning design, which will be featured in the building’s atrium on the first floor. "Since there is a global economic interrelation between China and the United States, I decided to approach my glass design on one type of Chinese accounting system." Tianlan’s art involves repeating the Chinese numbers one through five presented in a sequence used in the Qing dynasty for accounting. His design will be completely translucent at the top of the glass window, but will gradually become more opaque as it moves down the bottom of the glass. The pattern used on the window will also be used to create privacy screens for the offices.

The second artwork chosen was "Chromadynamics" by UK School of Art and Visual Studies lecturer in photography Robert Dickes. The mural will use 68,000 colored pencils pushed through black pegboard to create an array of colors that continually change as the viewer moves from one side of the piece to the other. "The pencil has been one of the most essential tools throughout the history of business," said Dickes. "It has been used in every form from accounting to the signing of contracts." It is Dickes’ hope that the large-scale work will captivate viewers by its peaceful tranquility of color and repetition. "As the viewer stands back to view the work at a distance they will see a color mosaic that appears to be a painting, similar to color field paintings of the 1940s and 50s."

The final artwork chosen for the new Gatton College building was the suspended sculpture to hang in the main atrium. Metal artist Garry Bibbs, associate professor of sculpture, was the winning applicant, with his piece "Humanity Roll – Left to Right." This dynamic sculpture, made of stainless steel and bronze plate, will present a strong conceptual reference in both meaning and scope. "I envisioned a sculptural composition that would capture the formal, environmental and spiritual essence of the Gatton College of Business and Economics building," said Bibbs. Made of three parts, the sculpture represents the travel of one’s life and the path through the world’s conflicting forces, such as technology, industry and societal disorder.

Due to the scale and scope of the artwork that the college chose for this new and innovative space, fabrication and structural engineering experts have been assembled to oversee the installation of all three art projects. All three pieces of art, along with the rest of $65 million renovation of the Gatton College building, are scheduled to be completed in fall of 2016. 

MEDIA CONTACTS: Whitney Hale, 859-257-8716 or whitney.hale@uky.edu; Carl Nathe, 859-257-3200 or carl.nathe@uky.edu

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