The Samuel Proctor Oral History Program Digital Collection includes the digital holdings of the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program (SPOHP) at the University of Florida. With over 5,000 interviews and more than 150,000 pages of transcribed material, the SPOHP collection is one of the largest oral history archives in the South and one of the top collections in the country. The largest collection contains more than 900 interviews with Native Americans including Seminoles, Cherokees, and Creeks. Other major holdings include projects on African Americans in Florida, Civil Rights action in St. Augustine (1964), and the University of Florida.

For ease of discovery, over 100 oral histories from the Matheson Museum are also included here.

SPOHP also houses sound archives, which include University of Florida-related speeches; videotapes of television interviews with Dean Rusk, William C. Westmoreland, and George McGovern; Native American slides and photographs; and 350 recordings of music, including concerts, folk music, and Native American chants.

Browse all items in the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program Digital Collections. >>

Using the Collections

The SPOHP archive is available for use by research scholars, students, journalists, genealogists, and other interested groups. Documents may be accessed through this digital collection, as well as the archive in Pugh Hall on UF's campus. When using any content, please make sure you reference it properly and make sure you are in compliance with the Copyright Notice.

Please use the following format to cite the material:

Transcript, (Name of interviewee) Oral History Interview with (Name of interviewer), (Date of interview), (page number), Samuel Proctor Oral History Program Collection, P.K. Yonge Library of Florida History, University of Florida.

More About the Collection

The digital collections cover only a small sample of the projects in our vast collection. For more, see the 2004 Catalog of Collections.

For more information on the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program (SPOHP), see:

SubCollections

  • The transcripts and podcasts for the Addiction Oral History Project are the result of a semester’s work by the Spring 2015 undergraduate internship class to explore historians’ understanding of the complex phenomenon of addiction. The transcripts of this product include interviews with former addicts, treatment providers, addiction researchers, drug historians, and representatives from the criminal justice system. Longtime drug users from a variety of backgrounds discussed their thoughts on what causes addiction and what it means to be “recovered,” and academics, clinicians, and others also offered their own perspectives on these questions based on years of professional observation. Several interviews feature the onset and maintenance of addiction, law enforcement protocol, demographic changes, and life in cities like Gainesville and Jacksonville since the 1960s. Addiction Oral History Project
  • The Mississippi Delta Freedom Project includes oral histories and related materials from the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program (SPOHP). Mississippi Delta Freedom Project
  • Florida Counties Oral History Collections Florida Counties Oral History Collections
  • Grouped among the Florida Topical Oral History Collections are interviews representing campus life and the history of the University of Florida. Florida Topical Oral History Collections
  • Miscellaneous Oral History Collections Miscellaneous Oral History Collections
  • Native Americans Oral History Collections Native Americans Oral History Collections
  • University of Florida Oral History Collections University of Florida Oral History Collections
  • The transcripts and podcasts for the Tidewater Main Street Development Project are the product of two years of fieldwork by Jessica Taylor, a former graduate coordinator of the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program. In October of 2014, she organized the inaugural Virginia Fieldwork in Folklore research trip, leading a research team of interns, SPOHP staff and graduate students to the Tidewater region of Virginia to record oral histories focusing on folklore, traditional crafts, and rural development. This ongoing fieldwork trip and collection has produced over 150 interviews with residents of Mathews, Middlesex, Gloucester, Lancaster, Northumberland, and Accomack Counties. Tidewater Main Street Development Project