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School Psychologist

School Psychology (PhD)

Northeastern University’s Doctoral Program in School Psychology is designed to prepare the next generation of leaders in school psychology. The ecological perspective and scientist-practitioner training model provide the foundation for the program’s educational goals. Students learn how to conduct research, to use research to inform practice, and to contribute to the scientific foundation of professional practice.

Program Overview

This program meets the “Guidelines for Defining ‘Doctoral Degree in Psychology’” as implemented by the ASPPB/National Register Designation Project. Therefore, a graduate of this designated program who decides to apply for licensure as a psychologist typically will meet the jurisdictional educational requirements for licensing. However, individual circumstances vary, and, there are additional requirements that must be satisfied prior to being licensed as a psychologist. Students should contact the state / provincial / territorial licensing board in the jurisdiction in which they plan to apply for exact information. Additional information including links to jurisdictions is available on the ASPPB’s web site: www.asppb.org.

Three Principal Themes
  1. Promotion of the educational and developmental success, and the mental and physical health, of children
  2. The reciprocal influence of science and practice in multicultural and urban contexts
  3. Development of leadership skills in research and practice
Five Major Training Goals
  1. To produce graduates with understanding of the basic areas of psychology.
  2. To produce graduates who are competent in research and scholarship.
  3. To produce graduates who uses a systematic, problem-solving approach in the practice of psychology.
  4. To produce graduates with awareness, sensitivity and skills in working with diverse individuals, groups and communities, who represent various cultural and personal backgrounds and characteristics defined broadly.
  5. To produce graduates with the knowledge and skills to engage in professional behavior that is ethically and legally appropriate.
Accreditation
Accreditation Info

Northeastern’s School Psychology PhD Program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of the American Psychological Association (APA). The next APA accreditation site visit will be held in 2020.

Questions related to the program’s accredited status should be directed to the Commission on Accreditation:

Office of Program Consultation and Accreditation
American Psychological Association
750 First Street, NE
Washington, DC 20002
Phone: (202) 336-5979/E-mail: apaaccred@apa.org

Web: www.apa.org/ed/accreditation

Application Due Date

December 1

Contact Information

Dr. Jessica Hoffman
Program Director
415 Int’l Village
Tel: 617.373.5257
j.hoffman@neu.edu

Core Faculty
Program Data

Highlights

The Ecological Framework

We prepare school psychologists who think systemically and who are aware of the profound effect culture and the environment have on the learning and emotional health of children.

Professional Identity and Social Conscience

Our students have a strong professional identity and social conscience. In addition, many of our alumni have assumed leadership roles in state and national organizations.

Practice-Oriented Education

Consistent with the mission of the university, real-world projects and work experiences are integrated into coursework throughout the program.

Interdisciplinary Collaboration

Our students learn how to work on teams in delivering services, and how to draw upon the rich resources of professionals from related disciplines.

Supportive Learning Environment

We view ongoing support and feedback as critical for students’ learning and professional development. Faculty members take pride in mentoring and advising students and incoming students receive peer mentorship from advanced students.

Sample Curriculum

Ph.D. students learn how to conduct research, use research to inform practice, and contribute to the scientific foundation of professional practice.

Our Ph.D. program is designed to train the next generation of leaders in school psychology

  • Fall Semester

    • CAEP 6202 Research, Eval. & Data Analysis (3)
    • CAEP 6206 Learning Principles (3)
    • CAEP 6218 Infant, Child and Adolescent Development (3)
    • CAEP 6365 Seminar in School Psychology (3)
  • Spring Semester

    • CAEP 7712 Intermediate Statistics (3)
    • CAEP 6203 Understanding Culture and Diversity (3)
    • CAEP 6347 Behavior Management (3)
    • CAEP 6350 Cognitive Assessment (3)
  • Summer Session I

    • CAEP 6400 Pre-Practicum (1)
    • CAEP 6240 Family, School, & Community Systems (3)
  • Summer Session II

    • CAEP 6399 Clinical Skills in Counseling Psychology (3)
  • Fall Semester

    • CAEP 6353 Curriculum Based Assessment (3)
    • CAEP 7711 Measurement: Advanced Psychometric Principles (3)
    • CAEP 8415 Practicum I (2)
    • CAEP 6352 Personality Assessment (3)
    • CAEP 7773 Res. Teams III (1)
  • Spring Semester

    • CAEP 7716 Adv. Research and Data Analyses (3)
    • CAEP 6345 Learning Prob. (3)
    • CAEP 6355 School Based Counseling (3)
    • CAEP 8416 Practicum II (2)
  • Fall Semester

    • CAEP 7756 Social Psych (3) or (alternating years)
    • CAEP 7750 Bio. Bases (3)
    • CAEP 7755 Cognitive & Affective Bases of Behavior (3)
    • CAEP 6390 History & Systems of Psychology (3) or (alternating years)
    • CAEP 6394 Advanced Multicultural (3)
    • CAEP 7741 Adv FW I (2)
  • Spring Semester

    • CAEP 6247 Child and Adolescent Psychopathology (3)
    • CAEP 6360 Consultation & Program Evaluation (3)
    • CAEP 7777 Doc. Seminar in Prog. Planning and Eval (3) or (alternating years)
    • CAEP 6722 Educational & Psychological Assessment & Intervention with Infants, Toddlers, & Children (3)
    • CAEP 7742 Adv FW II (2)
  • Fall Semester

    • CAEP 7756 Social Psych (3) or (in alternating years)
    • CAEP 7750 Bio. Bases (3)
    • CAEP 6390 History & Systems of Psychology (3) or (in alternating years)
    • CAEP 3694 Advanced Multicultural (3)
    • CAEP 7715 Philosophy of Science in Psychology (3)
    • CAEP 7743 Adv FW III (2)
    • CAEP 9990 (0) Dissertation
  • Spring Semester

    • CAEP 7732 Legal & Ethical Issues in Community & Educational Settings (3)
    • CAEP 7778 Doctoral Seminar: Leadership, Consultation, and Supervision (3)
    • CAEP 7777 Doc. Seminar in Prog. Planning and Eval (3) or (in alternating years)
    • CAEP 7722 Educational & Psychological Assessment & Intervention with Infants, Toddlers, & Children (3)
    • CAEP 7744 Adv. FW IV (2)

Students can apply for the CAGS in school psychology after successfully completing coursework, 1200 hours of AFW (600 in a school setting), and the comprehensive exam.

  • Fall Semester

    • CAEP 7798 Internship (2)
  • Spring Semester

    • CAEP 7799 Internship (2)

Admission Requirements

Candidates for admission are expected to meet the following requirements:

  • Strong undergraduate record
  • Strong graduate record, if applicable
  • GRE and TOEFL or IELTS
  • Personal statement of prior experience and professional goals
  • Three letters of recommendation
  • Personal interview with faculty and current students

It is preferable for prospective students to have an undergraduate major or minor in psychology. At a minimum prospective students should have taken the following undergraduate courses: (1) Introduction to Psychology; (2) Child Development; (3) Abnormal Psychology; and (4) Research Methods and Statistics. Prospective students should have prior experience working with children and conducting research.

The program faculty reviews your credentials to assess the likelihood of your successful completion of the program and your potential for contribution to the field of school psychology and the community at large.

Admission is based on the evaluation of demonstrated academic performance, quality of recommendations, previous relevant experience, and your fit within our program.

Students are accepted into the program based on undergraduate grades and GRE or MAT scores, which are reviewed by the program director. Applicants who do not hold an undergraduate degree from a U.S. institution and whose native language is not english must also take the TOEFL or IELTS.

Important Information

Prospective Student Information
Program Facts

Credit Hours

104 semester hours

Program Length

Typically 5 years from BA admission

Admission Requirements

  • Strong undergraduate record
  • Strong graduate record, if applicable
  • GRE and TOEFL or IELTS
  • Personal statement of prior experience and professional
  • Three letters of recommendation
  • Personal interview with faculty and current students

Graduation Requirements

  • GPA 3.00 or better;
  • Mentored research project;
  • Passing grades on all comprehensive exams;
  • Passing grades on all areas of portfolio;
  • Completed internship; and
  • Completed dissertation.

Measures of Satisfactory Progress

  • GPA 3.00 or better;
  • Satisfactory progress in field placements (Practicum, Advanced Field Work, Internship);
  • Satisfactory progress on portfolio;
  • Satisfactory progress in comprehensive exams;
  • Satisfactory completion of mentored research project;
  • Development/approval of dissertation proposal; and
  • Satisfactory completion/defense of dissertation.
Goals & Competencies

Goal #1: To produce graduates with understanding of the basic areas of psychology.

Competencies Expected for Goal 1:

1.1. Students will understand biological bases of behavior.

1.2. Students will understand cognitive and affective bases of behavior.

1.3. Students will understand theories and research that underlie the social aspects of behavior.

1.4. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the historical and philosophical influences on psychology, including school psychology

1.5. Students will demonstrate knowledge of typical and atypical human development with a focus on children and adolescents

Goal #2: To produce graduates who are competent in research and scholarship.

Competencies Expected for Goal 2:

2.1. Students will demonstrate the ability to formulate meaningful research questions based upon a broad critical review of the extant literature and relate their own findings to extant literature.

2.2. Students will demonstrate competence in research design (both group and single case) and program evaluation methods, taking into consideration threats to internal and external validity in addition to ethical considerations.

2.3. Students will demonstrate knowledge of a wide variety of statistical methods, including assumptions and limitations of each approach, and be able to select appropriate analyses given their research questions.

2.4. Students will demonstrate knowledge of traditional and modern test theory (e.g., reliability, validity, factor analysis, item response theory).

Goal #3: To produce graduates who use a systematic, problem-solving approach in the practice of psychology.

Competencies Expected for Goal 3:

3.1. Students will demonstrate the appropriate selection and administration of assessment procedures, taking into consideration contextual factors.

3.2. Students will demonstrate the ability to accurately integrate and interpret assessment findings from multiple sources and use these data to make recommendations that are evidence-based and culturally sensitive.

3.3. Students will demonstrate the ability to implement, monitor and evaluate evidence-based, culturally sensitive interventions.

3.4. Students will demonstrate the ability to provide consultation at the individual, and group, and systems levels.

3.5. Students will demonstrate the ability to provide prevention services.

Goal #4: To produce graduates with awareness, sensitivity and skills in working with diverse individuals, groups, and communities, who represent various cultural and personal backgrounds and characteristics defined broadly.

Competencies Expected for Goal 4:

4.1. Students will monitor and apply knowledge of themselves as cultural beings in assessment, intervention, consultation, and research.

4.2. Students will apply knowledge of others as cultural beings in assessment, intervention, consultation, and research.

4.3. Students will apply knowledge of the role of culture in their interactions with diverse others in assessment, intervention, consultation, and research.

Goal 5: To produce graduates with the knowledge and skills to engage in professional behavior that is ethically and legally appropriate.

Competencies Expected for Goal 5:

5.1. Students will demonstrate that they know and follow APA’s and NASP’s professional standards and ethical guidelines in their research and practice.

5.2. Students will demonstrate that they know and follow relevant federal and state laws and regulations in their research and practice.

5.3. Students will demonstrate knowledge of, purpose for, and roles in supervision.

Fieldwork at-a-Glance

Fieldwork training for the PhD Program in School Psychology consists of a 75-hour pre-practicum, a 200-hour practicum in a school, two years of advanced field work (600 hours each year, or approximately 20 hours/week) in a school and mental health/health care setting, and one year of an approved full-time, pre-doctoral internship, all with corresponding on-campus seminars where they receive university supervision and benefit from the experiences of their peers.

PRE-PRACTICUM

As its name denotes, the pre-practicum occurs prior to the practicum. Students complete the 75-hour pre-practicum in May and June in their first year of study. The purpose of the pre-practicum is for students to gain observational experiences and to learn about school ecology. In addition to school- based observational experiences, students participate in a one-semester hour pre-practicum seminar on campus, which is taught by one of the core school psychology faculty members.

PRACTICUM

Students complete 200 hours of field experience in school psychology during their second year in the program. Prior to beginning practicum, students must have a contract signed by their site and Northeastern University. Practicum begins in September and continues until the end of the public school year in June. Practicum supervision and mentoring must be provided by a state credentialed school psychologist with a minimum of three years of experience.

Students should receive at least one hour of face-to-face supervision per week during their practicum. Students should complete between 3-6 assessments during their practicum year with at least two comprehensive psycho-educational assessments. The comprehensive assessments should include multiple reliable and valid methods that assess multiple domains of functioning, and the choice of instruments should be derived from the presenting concerns / referral questions.

NB: the second-year practicum experience for doctoral students involves less than half of the hours completed by students in our C.A.G.S. program in their second year. Doctoral students should not exceed the 200-hour guideline as this will have a negative impact on their research development and the demands placed on them by their challenging coursework.

Course Work: Practicum students in the PhD program will have already taken the following courses:

  • Learning Principles
  • Infant, Child & Adolescent Development
  • Seminar in School Psychology
  • Understanding Culture and Diversity
  • Behavior Management
  • Research, Data Analsyis, and Evaluation
  • Research Teams
  • Intermediate Statistics
  • Family, School, and Community Systems
  • Cognitive Assessment
  • Clinical Skills in Counseling Psychology
  • Pre-practicum Seminar

During the practicum year students will take the following courses, some of which have associated fieldwork (see requirements below*) that must be completed in a school-based field site:

Fall Semester

  • Personality Assessment*
  • Curriculum Based Assessment*
  • Advanced Psychometric Principles
  • Practicum Seminar
  • Research Teams

*Fall Course-Based Requirements

Spring Semester

  • Advanced Research and Data Analysis
  • Learning Problems
  • School-based Counseling
  • Practicum Seminar

For the Personality Assessment course, students are required to complete a comprehensive assessment including (a) systematic direct observations (b) teacher, student, and parent interviews, and (c) broad and narrow band rating scales.

For the Curriculum Based Assessment course, students are required to (a) conduct a class-wide reading screening and, (b) based on the data, identify a student for a reading intervention, which they will then implement. They also need to identify and assess two students with academic difficulties (i.e., math, spelling, and writing).

*Spring Course-Based Requirements

For the School-Based Counseling course, students (a) are required to be counsel an individual or group for several weeks and (b) write a series of reports based on the case.

For the Learning Problems course, students are required to continue to evaluate interventions developed during the fall semester as part of the curriculum-based assessment course, and may need to modify interventions or change the intervention altogether based on student response to intervention.

ADVANCED FIELDWORK

Students complete 600 hours of Advanced Fieldwork during years 3 and 4 of the program. Students typically meet the requirement by completing 20 hours of fieldwork over the course of the academic year (September-June). Fieldwork sites typically offer the opportunity for several different types of psychological services including assessment, intervention and systems-level prevention. Sites may include schools, hospitals, and outpatient community mental health centers. At least 600 hours must occur in a K-12 school. School-based advanced fieldwork sites are required to provide at least one hour/week of individual supervision by a licensed (professional level) school psychologist. Non-school advanced fieldwork sites are required to provide at least one hour/week of individual supervision by a licensed doctoral-level supervisor, in addition to supervision by other staff, such as for group or family work, or psycho-diagnostic assessments.

During each year of advanced fieldwork a minimum of two face-to-face meetings will be conducted with the university supervisor, the field supervisor, and the graduate student to discuss the student’s progress. Advanced fieldwork sites are required to be within a 50-mile radius of the university. After each meeting, the university supervisor, the field supervisor, and the graduate student will sign the MA DOE Initial License as a School Psychology form that documents the occurrence of the meeting. In addition, university supervisors, field supervisors, and students will communicate via email and telephone on an ongoing basis to address needs as they arise.

Students participating in an Advanced Fieldwork placement are required to attend the Advanced Fieldwork Seminar, which is led by a faculty member who provides university-based group supervision. The seminar leader is the official liaison between the doctoral program and the field site. The seminar meets regularly during the fieldwork experience, and students are expected to present cases and participate in discussions. Fieldwork site supervisors will be asked to complete an evaluation of the student’s performance at the end of each semester. At the end of the year, students submit an evaluation of their site to the seminar leader.

The following table is provided to indicate student coursework during Advanced Fieldwork:

Year 3 Fall:

  • Social Psychology or
  • Biological Bases of Behavior
  • Cognitive & Affective Bases of Behavior
  • History & Systems of Psychology or
  • Advanced Multicultural
  • Advanced Fieldwork Seminar

Year 4 Fall :

  • -Social Psychology or
  • -Biological Bases of Behavior
  • -History & Systems of Psychology or
  • Advanced Multicultural
  • Philosophy of Science in Psychology
  • -Advanced Fieldwork Seminar

Year 3 Spring:

  • Child and Adolescent Psychopathology
  • Consultation & Program Evaluation
  • Doc. Sem. Program Planning & Evaluation or
  • Educational & Psychological Assessment & Intervention with Infants, Toddlers, & Child
  • Advanced Fieldwork Seminar

Year 4 Spring:

  • Doc. Sem: Leadership, Consultatopm, & Supervision
  • -Legal & Ethical Issues
  • -Doc. Sem. in Prog. Planning and Eval. or
  • -Educ. & Psych. Assessment & Intervention
  • with Infants, Toddlers, & Children  -Advanced Fieldwork Seminar

Field Supervision:

Field supervisors in school sites must have a Massachusetts educator’s license (certification) as a school psychologist and a minimum of three years of experience as a school psychologist. Practicum and Advanced Fieldwork supervision consists of a minimum of one hour per week, in a face-to-face format. In non-school sites, supervisors must be licensed health providers in the state of Massachusetts and a minimum of three years experience as a psychologist.

University Supervision:

Students are enrolled in a seminar course, instructed by a certified school psychologist during the practicum year. The university supervisor maintains contact with the field supervisor through two site visits and phone calls when necessary. At the end of the practicum year, the field and university supervisors determine if the student has progressed adequately in core areas and is ready for internship.
For more information please consult our website: http://www.schoolpsychology.neu.edu

Faculty Contact Information:

Director of Fieldwork:
Dr. Chieh Li
( c.li@neu.edu; 617-373-4683)

Program Director:
Dr. Jessica Hoffman
( j.hoffman@neu.edu; 617-373-5257)

Optional Concentration in Applied Behavior Analysis

Northeastern University’s School Psychology MS/CAGS and PhD Programs are now offering an optional concentration in Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA)

To improve school psychologists’ ability to address the learning and behavioral needs of children and adolescents with challenging behaviors in school, home and community settings, including children with autism spectrum disorders, Northeastern University has embedded an optional concentration in Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) into the school psychology MS/CAGS and PhD programs. This optional sequence of training is designed for graduate students who are already in the School Psychology MS/CAGS and PhD programs. Coursework from Northeastern’s Certificate Program in ABA is embedded into the existing school psychology curricula. The ABA course content is based on the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB) Fourth Edition Task List and prepares students to take the BACB exam. The optional concentration involves 6 courses, 3 of which are already part of the regular school psychology curriculum. The optional concentration adds a total of 6 semester hours to students’ programs of study.

  • CAEP 6327 Behavior Assessment
  • CAEP 6328 Research Design and Methods
  • CAEP 6336 Systematic Inquiry in Applied Research
  • CAEP 6206 Learning Principles*
  • CAEP 6347 Behavior Management*
  • CAEP 6365 Seminar in School Psychology*
  • CAEP 8417 Intensive Practicum in Applied Behavior Analysis I
  • CAEP 8418 Intensive Practicum in Applied Behavior Analysis II

*courses are part of the regular school psychology curriculum

Fieldwork requirements:

Students must complete 750 hours of intensive practicum (with 3 hours/week of supervision) after successful completion of coursework. Supervision must be provided by a Board Certified Behavior Analyst.

Current Student Information
Goals & Competencies

Goal #1: To produce graduates with understanding of the basic areas of psychology.

Competencies Expected for Goal 1:

1.1. Students will understand biological bases of behavior.

1.2. Students will understand cognitive and affective bases of behavior.

1.3. Students will understand theories and research that underlie the social aspects of behavior.

1.4. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the historical and philosophical influences on psychology, including school psychology

1.5. Students will demonstrate knowledge of typical and atypical human development with a focus on children and adolescents

Goal #2: To produce graduates who are competent in research and scholarship.

Competencies Expected for Goal 2:

2.1. Students will demonstrate the ability to formulate meaningful research questions based upon a broad critical review of the extant literature and relate their own findings to extant literature.

2.2. Students will demonstrate competence in research design (both group and single case) and program evaluation methods, taking into consideration threats to internal and external validity in addition to ethical considerations.

2.3. Students will demonstrate knowledge of a wide variety of statistical methods, including assumptions and limitations of each approach, and be able to select appropriate analyses given their research questions.

2.4. Students will demonstrate knowledge of traditional and modern test theory (e.g., reliability, validity, factor analysis, item response theory).

Goal #3: To produce graduates who use a systematic, problem-solving approach in the practice of psychology.

Competencies Expected for Goal 3:

3.1. Students will demonstrate the appropriate selection and administration of assessment procedures, taking into consideration contextual factors.

3.2. Students will demonstrate the ability to accurately integrate and interpret assessment findings from multiple sources and use these data to make recommendations that are evidence-based and culturally sensitive.

3.3. Students will demonstrate the ability to implement, monitor and evaluate evidence-based, culturally sensitive interventions.

3.4. Students will demonstrate the ability to provide consultation at the individual, and group, and systems levels.

3.5. Students will demonstrate the ability to provide prevention services.

Goal #4: To produce graduates with awareness, sensitivity and skills in working with diverse individuals, groups, and communities, who represent various cultural and personal backgrounds and characteristics defined broadly.

Competencies Expected for Goal 4:

4.1. Students will monitor and apply knowledge of themselves as cultural beings in assessment, intervention, consultation, and research.

4.2. Students will apply knowledge of others as cultural beings in assessment, intervention, consultation, and research.

4.3. Students will apply knowledge of the role of culture in their interactions with diverse others in assessment, intervention, consultation, and research.

Goal 5: To produce graduates with the knowledge and skills to engage in professional behavior that is ethically and legally appropriate.

Competencies Expected for Goal 5:

5.1. Students will demonstrate that they know and follow APA’s and NASP’s professional standards and ethical guidelines in their research and practice.

5.2. Students will demonstrate that they know and follow relevant federal and state laws and regulations in their research and practice.

5.3. Students will demonstrate knowledge of, purpose for, and roles in supervision.

Fieldwork at-a-Glance

Fieldwork training for the PhD Program in School Psychology consists of a 75-hour pre-practicum, a 200-hour practicum in a school, two years of advanced field work (600 hours each year, or approximately 20 hours/week) in a school and mental health/health care setting, and one year of an approved full-time, pre-doctoral internship, all with corresponding on-campus seminars where they receive university supervision and benefit from the experiences of their peers.

PRE-PRACTICUM

As its name denotes, the pre-practicum occurs prior to the practicum. Students complete the 75-hour pre-practicum in May and June in their first year of study. The purpose of the pre-practicum is for students to gain observational experiences and to learn about school ecology. In addition to school- based observational experiences, students participate in a one-semester hour pre-practicum seminar on campus, which is taught by one of the core school psychology faculty members.

PRACTICUM

Students complete 200 hours of field experience in school psychology during their second year in the program. Prior to beginning practicum, students must have a contract signed by their site and Northeastern University. Practicum begins in September and continues until the end of the public school year in June. Practicum supervision and mentoring must be provided by a state credentialed school psychologist with a minimum of three years of experience.

Students should receive at least one hour of face-to-face supervision per week during their practicum. Students should complete between 3-6 assessments during their practicum year with at least two comprehensive psycho-educational assessments. The comprehensive assessments should include multiple reliable and valid methods that assess multiple domains of functioning, and the choice of instruments should be derived from the presenting concerns / referral questions.

NB: the second-year practicum experience for doctoral students involves less than half of the hours completed by students in our C.A.G.S. program in their second year. Doctoral students should not exceed the 200-hour guideline as this will have a negative impact on their research development and the demands placed on them by their challenging coursework.

Course Work: Practicum students in the PhD program will have already taken the following courses:

  • Learning Principles
  • Infant, Child & Adolescent Development
  • Seminar in School Psychology
  • Understanding Culture and Diversity
  • Behavior Management
  • Research, Data Analsyis, and Evaluation
  • Research Teams
  • Intermediate Statistics
  • Family, School, and Community Systems
  • Cognitive Assessment
  • Clinical Skills in Counseling Psychology
  • Pre-practicum Seminar

During the practicum year students will take the following courses, some of which have associated fieldwork (see requirements below*) that must be completed in a school-based field site:

Fall Semester

  • Personality Assessment*
  • Curriculum Based Assessment*
  • Advanced Psychometric Principles
  • Practicum Seminar
  • Research Teams

*Fall Course-Based Requirements

Spring Semester

  • Advanced Research and Data Analysis
  • Learning Problems
  • School-based Counseling
  • Practicum Seminar

For the Personality Assessment course, students are required to complete a comprehensive assessment including (a) systematic direct observations (b) teacher, student, and parent interviews, and (c) broad and narrow band rating scales.

For the Curriculum Based Assessment course, students are required to (a) conduct a class-wide reading screening and, (b) based on the data, identify a student for a reading intervention, which they will then implement. They also need to identify and assess two students with academic difficulties (i.e., math, spelling, and writing).

*Spring Course-Based Requirements

For the School-Based Counseling course, students (a) are required to be counsel an individual or group for several weeks and (b) write a series of reports based on the case.

For the Learning Problems course, students are required to continue to evaluate interventions developed during the fall semester as part of the curriculum-based assessment course, and may need to modify interventions or change the intervention altogether based on student response to intervention.

ADVANCED FIELDWORK

Students complete 600 hours of Advanced Fieldwork during years 3 and 4 of the program. Students typically meet the requirement by completing 20 hours of fieldwork over the course of the academic year (September-June). Fieldwork sites typically offer the opportunity for several different types of psychological services including assessment, intervention and systems-level prevention. Sites may include schools, hospitals, and outpatient community mental health centers. At least 600 hours must occur in a K-12 school. School-based advanced fieldwork sites are required to provide at least one hour/week of individual supervision by a licensed (professional level) school psychologist. Non-school advanced fieldwork sites are required to provide at least one hour/week of individual supervision by a licensed doctoral-level supervisor, in addition to supervision by other staff, such as for group or family work, or psycho-diagnostic assessments.

During each year of advanced fieldwork a minimum of two face-to-face meetings will be conducted with the university supervisor, the field supervisor, and the graduate student to discuss the student’s progress. Advanced fieldwork sites are required to be within a 50-mile radius of the university. After each meeting, the university supervisor, the field supervisor, and the graduate student will sign the MA DOE Initial License as a School Psychology form that documents the occurrence of the meeting. In addition, university supervisors, field supervisors, and students will communicate via email and telephone on an ongoing basis to address needs as they arise.

Students participating in an Advanced Fieldwork placement are required to attend the Advanced Fieldwork Seminar, which is led by a faculty member who provides university-based group supervision. The seminar leader is the official liaison between the doctoral program and the field site. The seminar meets regularly during the fieldwork experience, and students are expected to present cases and participate in discussions. Fieldwork site supervisors will be asked to complete an evaluation of the student’s performance at the end of each semester. At the end of the year, students submit an evaluation of their site to the seminar leader.

The following table is provided to indicate student coursework during Advanced Fieldwork:

Year 3 Fall:

  • Social Psychology or
  • Biological Bases of Behavior
  • Cognitive & Affective Bases of Behavior
  • History & Systems of Psychology or
  • Advanced Multicultural
  • Advanced Fieldwork Seminar

Year 4 Fall :

  • -Social Psychology or
  • -Biological Bases of Behavior
  • -History & Systems of Psychology or
  • Advanced Multicultural
  • Philosophy of Science in Psychology
  • -Advanced Fieldwork Seminar

Year 3 Spring:

  • Child and Adolescent Psychopathology
  • Consultation & Program Evaluation
  • Doc. Sem. Program Planning & Evaluation or
  • Educational & Psychological Assessment & Intervention with Infants, Toddlers, & Child
  • Advanced Fieldwork Seminar

Year 4 Spring:

  • Doc. Sem: Leadership, Consultatopm, & Supervision
  • -Legal & Ethical Issues
  • -Doc. Sem. in Prog. Planning and Eval. or
  • -Educ. & Psych. Assessment & Intervention
  • with Infants, Toddlers, & Children  -Advanced Fieldwork Seminar

Field Supervision:

Field supervisors in school sites must have a Massachusetts educator’s license (certification) as a school psychologist and a minimum of three years of experience as a school psychologist. Practicum and Advanced Fieldwork supervision consists of a minimum of one hour per week, in a face-to-face format. In non-school sites, supervisors must be licensed health providers in the state of Massachusetts and a minimum of three years experience as a psychologist.

University Supervision:

Students are enrolled in a seminar course, instructed by a certified school psychologist during the practicum year. The university supervisor maintains contact with the field supervisor through two site visits and phone calls when necessary. At the end of the practicum year, the field and university supervisors determine if the student has progressed adequately in core areas and is ready for internship.
For more information please consult our website: http://www.schoolpsychology.neu.edu

Faculty Contact Information:

Director of Fieldwork:
Dr. Chieh Li
( c.li@neu.edu; 617-373-4683)

Program Director:
Dr. Jessica Hoffman
( j.hoffman@neu.edu; 617-373-5257)

Placement Contracts

Graduates:

If you are scheduled to attend your practicum, internship or advanced fieldwork this coming academic year, a “request for contract,” must be submitted to our department. The University requires a signed contract between the placement site and the University. You are not responsible for the signing or generating of the contract as there is a procedure already in place; however, we cannot generate a contract unless there is a request for one. Please use the link below to submit your request. Please allow up to 2 weeks to process your request.

DO NOT DISREGARD this message. Be advised, without a contract, legally you cannot start your fieldwork.

You may follow up on your request with Monique Clarke at (617) 373 -2485 or m.clarke@neu.edu.

Thank you for your attention to this matter.

Request a Contract

Apply to the School Psychology PhD Program.
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