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Undergraduate Information

Degrees
The college awards four undergraduate degrees: Bachelor of Arts in Communication Studies, Bachelor of Arts in Visual Communication Design, Bachelor of Fine Arts in Visual Communication Design and Bachelor of Science in Journalism and Mass Communication and in Photo-Illustration. Programs leading to the combined Bachelor of Science/Master of Fine Arts in Visual Communication Design, Master of Arts, Master of Fine Arts, Master of Library and Information Science, Master of Science in Information Architecture and Knowledge Management and Doctor of Philosophy degrees also are offered in the college.

Accreditation
Individual undergraduate programs are accredited or approved by:
• Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communication
• National Association of Schools of Art and Design

Admission
Selective admission criteria are used in some programs in the college. Students desiring to major in the School of Communication Studies are admitted as pre-majors, and later accepted into the appropriate program only after specific requirements have been met. It is imperative that the student contact the individual school for detailed information.

Students with an interest in a program for which they are not qualified are admitted into the communication and information general category until requirements are met. 

Academic Advising

Regular consultation with an academic advisor is an essential aspect of all students’ personal academic management and planning. Consultation at least once each semester for scheduling advice and assistance with registration procedures is the minimum expectation.

Academic advising for students in the College of Communication and Information is provided in each of the school offices (Communication Studies majors, 135 Taylor Hall; Journalism and Mass Communication majors, 328 Franklin Hall; Visual Communication Design and Photo Illustration majors, 231 Art Building). Students who are CCI General [CCIG] majors or those not sure which field in Communication to choose are advised in Communication Studies. The school offices provide advising for transfer students and intervention and referral programs for students on academic probation that include small group and individual counseling. Students may schedule an appointment with an academic advisor online through the website, http://cci.kent.edu/advising and/or individual school websites.

It is the student’s responsibility to seek out and use the advising resources available.

Requirement Audit
Upon completion of 60 semester hours, students are strongly advised to contact an academic advisor in their respective school to obtain a current evaluation of all progress toward completion of the chosen degree program. Requirement evaluations are not a substitute for meeting with an advisor. Questions about GPS degree audits can be answered in the school advising offices.

RESPONSIBILITY FOR MEETING ALL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS rests with students. The various advising services provided by the schools and the college are an effort to support and assist students in meeting this responsibility. Students’ failure to comply with all duly publicized academic requirements, however, is not the responsibility of the university.

Transfer Advising
Students transferring into the college from another university should make an appointment in their respective school advising office to determine applicability of transfer credits to their program before registering for classes. Those seeking admission to schools or programs with specialized admissions requirements should check the school’s section of this Catalog for special requirements.

Organization of the College

School of Communication Studies

The communication studies program involves the study and practice of human communication. Coursework examines intrapersonal, interpersonal, group and public communication in various organizations and professions. We study human communication processes through language, nonverbal, argumentation and persuasive interactions. The traditions of humanistic and social scientific communication theory are infused into the program.

Undergraduate communication studies majors will complete a 15-hour core and select one of four concentrations of 15 hours in the 45-credit major. The concentrations are applied communication, interpersonal communication, organizational communication and public communication.

Admission to the COMM Major
To be admitted to the COMM major, students must have a minimum 2.00 cumulative GPA. Transfer students with a minimum 2.00 cumulative GPA from their previous colleges and students who meet Kent State’s admission standards as entering freshmen also will be admitted to the COMM major

To be admitted to the communication studies major, students must earn a grade of C (2.00) or higher in COMM 20000, pass the grammar requirement and have a minimum 2.25 cumulative GPA. Students will remain as Pre-COMM majors until these standards are met.

Students must pass the grammar test with a score of 680 or higher or earn a minimum grade of C (2.00) in COMM 21000. If they fail to earn a minimum grade of C (2.00) or better in COMM 21000 after three attempts, they are not permitted to continue in the program.

The COMM Program
The program in communication studies is intended to enable students to lead meaningful and productive lives in interpersonal, organizational and public settings, and to prepare for a variety of careers in the professions of government, public or social service, business, industry and counseling. For those intending to continue with graduate study, the program leads to careers in college or university teaching and advanced positions in the public and private sectors.

Graduate programs leading to the Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees also are available.

Scholarships and Awards
Among scholarships and awards available to students in the School of Communication Studies are the Pierce Memorial Award, the Michael Dubetz Scholarship and the Rebecca and Alan Rubin Endowed Scholarship.

Activities and Organizations
The Kent Communication Society is an undergraduate association open to all. Students also may earn membership (by superior academic performance) in Lambda Pi Eta national communication honor society. Membership in Pi Kappa Delta, national forensics honor fraternity, may be awarded and academic credit can be earned for intercollegiate forensics participation. Information on any of these programs can be obtained in room 123 Taylor Hall or at the school homepage: http://www.kent.edu/comm/.

School of Journalism and Mass Communication

The School of Journalism and Mass Communication offers professionally oriented programs at both the undergraduate and graduate levels to prepare students for positions in mass communication.

The school’s responsibilities include training students for careers, providing leadership for persons currently working in the mass media and helping to increase public awareness of the role of the media.

The curriculum is designed to provide students with the benefits of both a strong liberal arts education and professional training. Journalism and mass communication requirements make up approximately 25 percent of the students’ program, with requirements in other areas and elective courses constituting the other 75 percent.

Faculty members have substantial professional experience in the mass media in addition to teaching and academic qualifications. Also, a number of area professionals teach as adjunct faculty.

The School of Journalism and Mass Communication provides professional service and leadership through seminars and professional workshops for journalists. Faculty members are active in a number of professional organizations and serve as consultants to groups in mass communication.

Journalism and mass communication majors supplement their coursework with an internship in their field of specialization. Other opportunities for practical experience include news, production, management, sales, performance and advertising positions on the campus newspaper, the Daily Kent Stater, and its online edition; the campus television station, TV-2; the campus radio station, Black Squirrel Radio; and the campus magazine, the Burr, and its online edition.

Students also may participate in student chapters of six national professional organizations: American Advertising Federation, Journalism and Mass Communication Honorary Kappa Tau Alpha, Public Relations Student Society of America, National Association of Black Journalists, Society of Professional Journalists and the Association of Women in Communications.

Programs leading to the Bachelor of Science degree are available for students interested in a variety of electronic media. The students may look to possible careers as radio-television performers, program production personnel, producers, broadcast sales promoters and advertisers, and broadcast copy and script writers. Other options include careers in nonbroadcast and new media utilization of audio and video communication in industrial training and in public communication. Careers are applicable to both commercial and public broadcasting operations.

B.S. degree programs also are available for majors in advertising, electronic media, news, public relations and visual journalism.

Students who major in the news sequence select one of three areas of study: newspaper journalism, magazine journalism or broadcast journalism.

Students in any journalism and mass communication major may elect a minor outside or within the School of Journalism and Mass Communication.

In each of the baccalaureate degree programs, students must satisfy the 36-hour minimum stipulated in the Kent Core.

The School of Journalism and Mass Communication is accredited nationally by the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communication. In addition, the school holds memberships in the Ohio Newspaper Association, the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Broadcast Education Association and the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication.

For more than 50 years, the school has sponsored the Northeastern Ohio Scholastic Press Association to encourage and guide the practice of journalism at the secondary school level.

Graduate programs leading to the Master of Arts degree also are available. These are described in the Graduate Information section of this college website.

Admissions Policy

Students first entering the university, whether from high school or transferring from another institution, are admitted directly into one of the nine JMC majors/concentrations. A Kent State GPA of 2.75 must be maintained to continue taking JMC courses.

Current Kent State students wishing to pursue a major in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication must have a GPA of 2.75 or higher to be admitted directly into one of the nine majors/concentrations.

Current Kent States students with a GPA lower than 2.75 (but 2.0 or higher) may be admitted as pre-journalism and mass communication majors.

Current and transfer students can declare a major or pre-major in 201 or 328 Franklin Hall. It is strongly recommended that student meet with a JMC academic advisor when declaring. To schedule an appointment go to jmc.kent.edu and follow the Make an Advising Appointment links.

School Requirements
Students must complete the following requirements for graduation in all journalism and mass communication programs.

Students must pass the school’s grammar usage and punctuation test before enrolling in any of the following JMC courses: 26001 Newswriting, 30004 Writing for Electronic Media, 30034 Programming for Electronic Media, 31002 Advertising Copywriting, 31003 Advertising Media Planning, 32001 Photojournalism I, 40006 Law of Mass Communication, 40010 Ethics and Issues in Mass Communication, 44040 Concept Psychographics and 46001 Information Graphics.

Within the 124 total hours required for graduation, 80 hours must be in coursework outside the School of Journalism and Mass Communication, with 65 of those 80 hours in liberal studies courses.

Students electing minors that are not liberal studies in nature may need to complete more than 124 hours.

A 2.75 overall GPA at Kent State and a 2.75 GPA in JMC courses are required for graduation for both JMC majors and minors. A 2.75 overall GPA is also required to enroll in JMC courses. Students who fall below a 2.75 overall will be allowed to remain in JMC courses for which they are already registered for one more semester. They will be given one semester to bring their overall GPA up to the school minimum. Failure to do so will result in not being permitted to enroll in JMC courses until their overall GPA reaches the school minimum. In addition, no grade lower than a C- (1.70) in a JMC course will be counted toward graduation or as a prerequisite for a subsequent class.

Students must earn a B- (2.70) or better in JMC 20004 Media Writing to move on in their major. If they fail to earn a B- (2.70) or better in JMC 20004 after two attempts, they are not permitted to continue in the journalism and mass communication program.

Writing-Intensive Course Requirement
Refer to this Catalog for specific information on the writing-intensive course requirement.

School of Library and Information Science

The School of Library and Information Science prepares students for positions of leadership in librarianship and the information professions. The school emphasizes the preparation of master’s students for professional library and information service in academic, public, special and school libraries as well as other types of information agencies.

Programs
Master of Library and Information Science
The school offers a graduate program, accredited by the American Library Association, which leads to a Master of Library and Information Science degree. The M.L.I.S. is offered on the Kent Campus as well as at The State Library of Ohio as part of Kent State’s Columbus program. Selected individual courses also are offered at sites in Cleveland and at other locations throughout Ohio. The master’s degree is accepted as the basic degree in librarianship and is necessary for professional employment. Dependent on the course of study chosen and on personal background, M.L.I.S. graduates have a wide range of job options open to them in traditional library settings as well as in less traditional areas in the information field. Career opportunities outside formal library settings can be in the profit as well as the nonprofit sector.

Dual Degree Option
A desirable credential for a number of positions, especially in large research institutions, is that of a master’s degree in a subject area in addition to the master’s degree in library/information science. It is possible to work on two master’s degrees concurrently at Kent State University. Up to 11 hours of credit may be shared between two programs.

Master of Library and Information Science and Master of Business Administration
The Master of Library and Information Science and Master of Business Administration (M.L.I.S.-M.B.A.) Dual Degree Program is designed for students planning careers in library or information center administration. Individuals in these positions need knowledge pertaining to planning, organizing, staffing, directing and controlling. Advanced education to obtain knowledge and learn skills related to these management functions enables students to take advantage of career opportunities in library settings and other information settings in the profit and nonprofit sectors.

Master of Library and Information Science and Master of Science in Information Architecture and Knowledge Management
Those students interested in a multidisciplinary approach to graduate studies in the information-related disciplines and professions may also consider pursuing the Master of Library and Information Science and Master of Science in Information Architecture and Knowledge Management multiple degrees option. For further information about the Master of Science in Information Architecture and Knowledge Management or the multiple degrees option, please consult the program Web site at http://iakm.kent.edu.

Master of Library and Information Science plus School Library Media Licensure
Those students intending to be licensed as school librarians by the state of Ohio must complete a required sequence of courses as established by the School of Library and Information Science and the information technology program within the College of Education, Health, and Human Services. In addition, they must successfully complete the Praxis II exam for Library Media Specialists, administered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS). Students who select this option must already hold a valid Ohio teaching license.

Advising
When students are accepted into the School of Library and Information Science, a faculty advisor is assigned. It is expected that students will work with the advisor to plan a program of study.

For more information about the School of Library and Information Science, the programs offered through the school or careers in the field of library and information science, please contact the school at:
Phone: 330-672-2782
Fax: 330-672-7965
e-mail Inform@slis.kent.edu
Web site: http://www.slis.kent.edu/.

School of Visual Communication Design

The mission of the School of Visual Communication Design (VCD) is to provide a comprehensive and superior professionally oriented education in the study and practice of visual communication design that will complement university studies in the liberal arts, humanities and sciences. The intention and emphasis of the visual communication design degree programs is the preparation of students for the graphic design and illustration professions; specifically, to develop technical proficiency, aesthetic sensibility and design expertise in the organization of imagery and typography to communicate information in two-dimensional form by graphics for print, video and interactive electronic multiple media, and in three-dimensional form through packaging, exhibition and environmental graphics. In support of this mission, a liberal education is a necessary foundation or catalyst to the development of perception, intellect, imagination, skill and knowledge of the history of the visual communication design field.

The School of Visual Communication Design offers three undergraduate degree programs: the Bachelor of Arts, the Bachelor of Fine Arts, Bachelor of Science and a combined Bachelor of Science/Master of Arts (or Master of Fine Arts). Stand-alone degrees of the Master of Arts and the Master of Fine Arts programs are also offered. See the Graduate Information section of this college.

The Admissions Office will process all applications with respect to the general qualifications for admission to the university for new freshmen and transfer students.

The School of Visual Communication Design recognizes that competence in visual design as well as intellectual capacity are necessary qualities in students who plan to prepare for a career in visual communication design. Therefore, the right is reserved to require evidence of achievement in design and related areas from all students endeavoring to enroll for the first time as majors in the school. Early admission is recommended. To receive a baccalaureate degree from the School of Visual Communication Design, a student must, in addition to other requirements, satisfy the 36-hour minimum stipulated in the Kent Corecourses.

Transfer Students

Students meeting the general requirements of the university for transfer admission will be admitted to the program. Transfer credits will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. In most situations, completion of the VCD basic coursework is a necessary prerequisite to further study. The director of the School of Visual Communication Design may impose additional requirements considered reasonable and necessary. Transfer credits are evaluated consistent with the university policy, although each student will be evaluated individually in terms of his or her ability to perform within the program. A transfer applicant’s strengths and deficiencies will be considered and his or her transfer credits will reflect that consideration.

Transfer students should make every effort to complete admission requirements before the deadlines listed under “Entering the University” at the front of the Catalog and see an advisor in the School of Visual Communication Design for schedule planning before registration.

The Kent State University School of Visual Communication Design is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Art and Design.

Writing-Intensive Course Requirement
Refer to this Catalog for specific information on the writing-intensive course requirement.

General Academic Requirements

Scholastic Requirements
All candidates for a degree in the College of Communication and Information must meet all requirements listed under the program of their major in this Catalog. In addition, students must meet the following scholastic qualifications:

  • A cumulative overall GPA of at least 2.00 (C) for all courses taken at Kent State University. (Some programs require a higher overall GPA.)
  • A cumulative GPA of at least 2.25 in the major and, where applicable, the minor. Certain programs require higher GPAs. Consult the degree requirements for the major as listed in this Catalog.
  • Successful completion of at least 39 upper-division hours of coursework. Upper-division courses are numbered 30000-49999.

Kent Core
To receive a baccalaureate degree from the College of Communication and Information, a student must, in addition to other requirements, satisfy the 36-37-hour minimum stipulated in the Kent Core courses.

Some majors have specific requirements within these areas. Please check the requirements for your major as listed in this Catalog.

Writing-Intensive Course Requirement
Refer to the course section this Catalog for specific information on the writing-intensive course requirement.

Pass/Fail Option
Courses used to meet the university’s Kent Core courses are excluded from the pass/fail option. Courses taken within the major, minor or in completion of certificate programs also are excluded. Only general electives—courses not used to satisfy any specific requirement—may be taken on a pass/fail basis. See Pass/Fail Policy.

Graduation Procedures
The application for graduation must be submitted to the respective school advising office according to the deadlines published in this Catalog. The deadline for application is generally two full semesters before graduation. Students who either change catalogs or change any major, minor, concentration, option or emphasis after their graduation audit has been completed will be moved to the next graduation date. See graduation for more information.

No-Credit Courses
Four of the courses that may be prescribed or recommended through placement testing, MATH 10021 and 10022, US 10003 and 10006, do not generate credit toward graduation. Although these courses will count toward the course load for financial aid and other purposes, hours taken in these courses will be subtracted from the students’ total before graduation.

Other prescribed courses, including ENG 11001, MATH 10023 do count, but toward general elective hours only. None of the prescribed courses may be taken pass/fail.

Course Substitutions
Students who desire to substitute a course for one required in their program must secure written approval from their school academic or faculty advisor prior to enrolling in the substitute course.

PEB—ROTC
No more than 4 credit hours of PEB activities courses or the first 16 credit hours of ROTC courses may apply to the 121 semester hours required for graduation.

Veterans who have completed a minimum of one year of active duty may receive PEB credit for military basic training according to branch of service, as follows: Army and Marine Corps, 3 credit hours; Navy and Coast Guard, 2 hours; Air Force, 1 hour.

Natural Sciences
Credit toward fulfilling the natural science requirement is not given for the following combinations:
• PHY 11660 and the CHEM 10050 series, the CHEM 10060 series and/or the PHY 13001 series;
• both the CHEM 10050 series and the CHEM 10060 series;
• both the PHY 13001 series and the PHY 23101 series.

Minors
Students who seek the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees in some programs may be required to complete a minor. In certain circumstances, an individually planned minor may be approved upon recommendation of the director of the school in which the students are enrolled and the chairperson of the department in which the minors are proposed. However, an individualized minor is not officially recognized. Consult the program descriptions listed by the schools to determine if a minor is required.

Students may elect a minor outside or within the College of Communication and Information. Where major and minor requirements overlap, students may apply courses in both areas.

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