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Pharmacology Program Faculty

Learn more about Kent State’s Pharmacology Program faculty today.  All of our faculty members have extensive educational backgrounds that make them exceptional sources of industry information and insights. Feel free to contact any of the Pharmacology Program faculty listed below by clicking on the link to their email address.

Once you’ve read about the Pharmacology Program faculty members, be sure to learn more about the Pharmacology Program itself. If you have any questions or would like additional information, please contact the School of Biomedical Sciences.

Soumitra Basu
sbasu@kent.edu
330-672-3906

Ph.D., Jefferson University. Molecular basis of RNA structure and function, drug design. More on Basu

Deepak Bhatia
dbhatia@neomed.edu
330-325-6482

Ph,D., genetic and epigenetic changes in human lung cancer, genotoxic stress, growth control genes. More on Bhatia

Richard Carroll
rcarroll@neomed.edu
330-325-6657

Ph.D., University of Toledo. Neurodevelopment, neurodegenerative dieseases, Autism, Alzheimers, inflammation and recovery. More on Carroll

Yeong-Renn Chen
ychen1@neomed.edu
330-325-6537

Ph.D., Oklahoma State University. Oxygen free radicals, Nitric oxide, oxidative postranslational modifications, mitochondrial biology in myocardial infarction. More on Chen

John Y.L. Chiang
jchiang@neomed.edu
330-325-6694

Ph.D., SUNY Albany. Molecular cloning, expression and regulation of cytochrome P-450 genes; regulation of bile acid synthesis and cholesterol metabolism in the human liver. More on Chiang

William Chilian
wchilian@neomed.edu
330-325-6426

Ph.D., University of Missouri. Angiogenesis, arteriogenesis, regulation of coronary blood flow, heart failure, stem cells, regenerative medicine. More on Chilian

Altaf Darvesh
adarvesh@neomed.edu
330-325-6658

Ph.D., University of Cincinnati, Development of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory strategies for neoplastic an neurodegenerative diseases, as well as psychiatric disorders.  More on Darvesh

Werner J. Geldenhuys
wgelden@neomed.edu
330-325-6474

Ph.D., North-West University, Potchefstroom. Drug discovery and neurodegenerative disorders, proteomics, bioinformatics. More on Geldenhuys

Yoon-Kwang Lee
ylee3@neomed.edu
330-325-6415

Ph.D., Rutgers University. Structure and regulation of nuclear hormone receptors. More on Lee

Alexander Mdzinarishvili
amdzinarishvili@neomed.edu
330-325-6545

Ph.D., Russian Academy of Medical Sciences. Neurodegeneration in brain stroke (ischemia, edema), neural stem cells (regeneration and self-repair). More on Mdzinarishvili

J. Gary Meszaros
jgmeszar@neomed.edu
330-325-2565

Ph.D., Univ. Texas Health Sciences Ctr., Houston. G-proteins in cardiac fibroblasts and myocytes; second messengers; receptor desensitization, cardiac fibrosis and failure. More on Meszaros

Priya Raman
praman@neomed.edu
330-325-6425

Ph.D., University of Louisiana at Monroe. Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying cardiovascular complications associated with diabetes and obesity; atherosclerosis; leptin; Thrombospondin-1. More on Raman

Prabodh Sadana
psadana@neomed.edu
330-325-6676

Ph.D., University of Tennessee. Hormonal regulation of lipid metabolism. More on Sadana

Charles Thodeti
cthodeti@neomed.edu
330-325-6423

Ph.D., S.V. University. Mechanical control of integrin activation in capillary endothelial cells, signal transduction. More on Thodeti

June Yun
jyun@neomed.edu
330-325-6638

Ph.D., George Washington University. Signaling via adrenergic receptors, cardiac contractility and growth. More on Yun

Yanqiao Zhang
yzhang@neomed.edu
330-325-6693

Ph.D., Wuhan University. Regulation of lipid and glucose metabolism under normal and disease conditions.  More on Zhang

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