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Population Health PhD

Program Overview

The PhD Program in Population Health at Northeastern University integrates interdisciplinary education and experiential learning opportunities to train students to become public health leaders who understand the complex factors that affect the health and well-being of populations.

Close mentoring by distinguished faculty

Focus on solution-based, innovative research

Specialized training in critical population health topics

Curriculum

Our Population Health doctoral students conduct research that addresses five key determinants of health:

Social and Community Context

Environment and Neighborhoods

Health and Health Care Delivery

Education

Economic Stability

All Population Health PhD candidates must earn at least 33 credits by completing core research courses, selecting a concentration, and taking additional electives and directed study courses, as needed and in consultation with their faculty advisors. They must complete a dissertation in order to earn their degree.

Students investigate the underlying causes of adverse health, including disease, disparities, and disability, through training in core population health disciplines.

  • Biostatistics in Public Health (3 credits)
  • Epidemiology (3 credits)
  • Principals of Population Health 1 (3 credits)
  • Principals of Population Health 2 (3 credits)
  • Economic Perspectives on Health Policy (3 credits)
  • Applied Regression Analysis (3 credits)
  • Intermediate Epidemiology (3 credits)
  • Research Skills and Ethics (1 credit)

Students are trained to conduct research examining the social and environmental determinants of health through a cohesive, transdisciplinary program that integrates topics that include the five pillars of public health, including epidemiology, biostatistics, health program evaluation, environmental health, and social determinants of health.

  • Social Epidemiology (3 credits)
  • Advanced Methods in Biostatistics (3 credits)
  • Dissertation preparation classes (exact credits determined in conjunction with faculty advisor)
  • Directed Study (3 credits, can be repeated as needed)
  • Various electives (exact number of courses determined in conjunction with faculty advisor)
    Sample Electives (3 credits)
    • Theoretical Foundations of Personal Health Informatics
    • Health Organization Management
    • Public Health Policy and Administration
    • Strategic Management and Leadership in Health Care
    • Global Health
    • Health Education and Program Planning
    • Advances in Measuring Behavior
    • Social Movements in Health
    • Qualitative Methods in Health and Illness
    • Causal Inference in Public Health
    • Data Mining
    • Statistics for Big Data Sets

Students are trained to conduct highly rigorous research examining the financing, organization, and delivery of health care services through the use of quantitative and qualitative research methods.

  • Microeconomic Theory (4 credits)
  • Evaluating Health Care Quality (3 credits)
  • Dissertation preparation classes (exact credits determined in conjunction with faculty advisor)
  • Directed Study (3 credits, can be repeated as needed)
  • Various electives (exact number of courses determined in conjunction with faculty advisor)
    Sample Electives (3 credits)
    • Theoretical Foundations of Personal Health Informatics
    • Health Organization Management
    • Public Health Policy and Administration
    • Strategic Management and Leadership in Health Care
    • Global Health
    • Health Education and Program Planning
    • Advances in Measuring Behavior
    • Social Movements in Health
    • Qualitative Methods in Health and Illness
    • Causal Inference in Public Health
    • Data Mining
    • Statistics for Big Data Sets

Admissions

The Population Health PhD Program accepts applications through 2/1 for Fall entry only.

Applicants accepted:    Domestic and International   
Delivery:    On campus with some options to take classes online   
Student status:    Choice of part-time or full-time   
Term Start:    Fall only*   
Application deadline:    2/1   

*Requests for a Spring start are considered on a case by case basis by the Program Director and require the submission of a completed application by 10/15.

Admissions Checklist

Click each required application item for more information.

Completed application

Completed application via Northeastern’s “Apply Yourself”

All applications must be submitted through Northeastern’s “Apply Yourself” application system. A fee of $75 by credit card or check is required for each submitted application. Current NU students and alumni do not need to pay this application fee.

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Official transcripts

Official transcripts

For information on sending official transcripts, please review the instructions on the Bouve Graduate Application website.

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Official test scores

Official test scores

GRE scores from the past five years are required. Use code #3629. The GRE requirement cannot be waived under any circumstances. While the PhD Program does not have GRE score cut-offs, we encourage you to submit the best scores you can.

TOEFL scores are required from international applicants who possess degrees from institutions outside the United States. Use code #3629. The PhD Program requires a minimum score of 100 on the TOEFL (official test scores from similar English-language tests may not be substituted in place of the TOEFL).

Requests to be waived from the TOEFL requirement are determined on a case by case basis by the Program Director. Email Dr. Helen Suh at suh@neu.edu with your request and relevant materials (eg, CV/resume, transcripts).

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3 letters of recommendation

Three letters of recommendation

Only academic and professional letters of recommendation will be accepted.

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Personal statement

Personal statement

Your personal statement should discuss how your background informs your research interests. It should demonstrate how your training and experience motivates you to pursue a type of research. The type of research doesn’t have to be specific, but it should also not be too general (eg, population health is too general.

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Student Profiles

Click on each student’s photo to read about their research interests and experiences in the doctoral program.

Meredith Milstein

Meredith Milstein

Why did you choose to apply to this program?
I chose to apply to the Population Health program because it is unique in that it combines multiple facets necessary to understand how to approach improving the health outcomes and behaviors of an entire population. This includes statistical and epidemiological methods, social theory and determinants, and how to translate health outcomes into policy recommendations.

What kind of research are you doing?

I am currently evaluating biases associated with different survival analysis methods and censoring techniques, particularly during their use when analyzing multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment cohorts. I aim to identify more efficient means to analyze these data under differing scenarios, resulting in less bias outcomes and more accurate effect measures to inform treatment recommendations.

What kind of research or professional experiences have you had?

I have over 6 years experience implementing clinical trials, including drug trials for asthma treatment and international research assessing tuberculosis treatments. My most current research, evaluating multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment outcomes in adolescents, was presented at the 46th UNION World Conference on Lung Health in December 2015.

What are your professional aspirations?

I aspire to be a member of an academic institution, teaching epidemiology and/or research methods courses, to mentor students early in their research careers, and to conduct personal research related to identifying more efficient processes for the diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of tuberculosis patients worldwide.

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Meredith Milstein

Renee Wurth

Renee Wurth
Why did you choose to apply to this program?

I chose this program due to its multidisciplinary take on health research.  It lets me merge together my interests and think of translational research.

What kind of research are you doing?

I am focusing primarily on nutrition research, but have been able to work with a wide array of projects that incorporate this component, such as air pollution and the human gut microbiome.

What kind of research or professional experiences have you had?

I have gone to several conferences and also traveled to San Diego to do a research fellowship.

What are your professional aspirations?

I like this program because I do not feel limited in my future career and plan to keep the options open.

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Renee Wurth

Stephen Flaherty

Stephen Flaherty
Why did you choose to apply to this program?

I actually started in the Personal Health Informatics program but realized that I was doing most of the course work for Population Health and I switch programs last year. The Population Health program fit my interests in healthcare delivery and quality better, and I am glad I made the change.

What kind of research are you doing?

My research is centered on healthcare delivery, utilization, and quality. I am interested in exploring the challenges in our healthcare system that lead to waste, low efficiency, and poor outcomes. I working on two projects at the moment: one on hospitals in accountable care organizations and how hospitals performed on a variety of measures including quality, community spending, and community benefits; the other is going to explore patterns of diagnostic imaging across Massachusetts with data from a massive claims dataset collected by the state.

What kind of research or professional experiences have you had?

I have worked in healthcare for many years in clinical, managerial, and research settings. I have presented at radiology conferences and quality symposiums on several occasions, and have worked extensively with faculty in research and clinical settings.

What are your professional aspirations?

My goal is to work in an academic setting where I can do healthcare services research and teach.

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Stephen Flaherty

Brianne Mui

Brianne Mui
Why did you choose to apply to this program?

A mentor of mine and faculty member at NYU advised me to apply here.

What kind of research are you doing?

I am working with Becky Briesacher, an amazing new faculty member.  We are researching nursing home prescribing practices. With a novel dataset she has acquired I hope to be able to investigate prescribing practices among HIV/AIDS nursing home patients.

What kind of research or professional experiences have you had?

The majority of the last 10 years of my professional career were spent in clinical laboratories in NYC, clinical chemistry and genetics specifically. During my MPH, worked at CHIBPS NYU on a study of young men who have sex with men in NYC and their HIV outcomes. After finishing my MPH, I took a data management and analysis position working with the New York City Fire Department studying health outcomes of 9/11 first responders.

What are your professional aspirations?

After completing my PhD here at NEU, my hope is to go on to broaden the scope of literature on HIV/AIDS among under represented populations such as the different sub populations within the LGBT community and the elderly. Teaching is a challenge I would like to take on, but research is my real passion.

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Brianne Mui

Students in the News

Cassidy Griffin

Frequently Asked Questions

Does your program have course prerequisites?

No, our program does not have specific requirements with regard to classes applicants must take or have taken prior to applying.

Do I need to possess an advanced degree to apply?

While competitive applicants typically already possess an advanced degree, we will consider exceptionally qualified applicants with a bachelor’s degree, as well.

Does your program accept transfer credits?

A maximum of 9 semester/12 quarter hours of credit obtained at another institution may be accepted towards the degree, provided the credits consist of work taken at the graduate level for graduate credit, carry grades of 3.000 (B) or better,, and have not been used toward any other degree. These courses must have been taken within 5 years prior to the transfer.

Can I be waived from submitting official test scores?

Admission to the Population Health PhD program is contingent on receiving GRE scores (taken within the past five years) from all applicants, and this requirement cannot be waived. In addition, TOEFL scores are required from all international applicants who have received degrees from institutions outside the United States. Guidelines for submitting a request to waiver the TOEFL requirement are outlined in the Admissions section.

Can I be waived from any classes?

Certain required classes (for example, introductory classes in Biostatistics and Epidemiology) can be waived if you’ve taken equivalent classes in previous graduate programs. Course waivers will be determined on a case by case basis once a student is accepted and officially matriculates into the PhD Program.

How much does the program cost?

Doctoral students in the Population Health PhD program pay per credit taken. The latest cost per credit for Bouve College of Health Sciences programs can be found on Northeastern’s Student Financial Services webpage.

What kind of funding does the PhD Program offer?

Our program offers a select number of graduate assistantships for doctoral students, which covers tuition and includes a yearly stipend in exchange for 20 hours of work each week. You do not need to do anything further than submitting an application to the Program to be considered for a graduate assistantship.

Does your program offer online courses?

Some required courses have online course equivalents that doctoral students may choose to take, but it is not required.

Can I work full time and attend the PhD Program on a part-time basis?

Many courses in the PhD Program meet in the early evenings, and some meet during the day. Most courses meet once a week or twice a week. With enough work flexibility, it is possible to work full time and attend school part-time.

Can I apply to the PhD Program and the MPH Program at the same time?

Yes, you can apply to both programs and be considered for both. Please note the application process is separate for the two programs. Please see the MPH Program page for more information about applying to that program.

Can I speak with faculty in the PhD Program that may share my research interests?

Yes, we would be happy to put you in touch with our faculty. Please send your query to Rebecca Stouff, Population Heath PhD Program Manager, at PopHealth@northeastern.edu along with a description of your research interests so you can be appropriately matched.

Contact Information

We welcome any questions you might have about our program. Please feel free to send general program inquiries and admissions-related questions to Dr. Beth E. Molnar.

Beth E. Molnar

Professor Molnar is a social and psychiatric epidemiologist affiliated with the Department of Health Sciences and the Institute for Urban Health Research (IUHR) at Northeastern University.  She is a member of the core faculty of the MPH program in Urban Health in Health Sciences, and an Associate Director at the IUHR.  Dr. Molnar’s research is grounded in three public health domains: social epidemiology, prevention science, and psychiatric epidemiology.  Studies focus on two major areas: (1) violent, traumatic experiences (such as child maltreatment, sexual violence, community violence) and the ways that they affect children and youth, and (2) the social context of high-risk behaviors among adolescents (the latter often being sequelae of the first.) One main area of Dr. Molnar’s expertise is multilevel methods, where she utilizes neighborhood-level analyses for insight into both etiology and prevention strategies.  Another main area of expertise is community-based participatory research methodology, from systematic needs assessments to multilevel research designs, to survey/measures development, to evaluation research, to implementation, to analyses and dissemination.  Using both quantitative and qualitative methods, Dr. Molnar’s most recent work, strongly influenced by Bronfenbrenner’s Bioecological Theory of Human Development, has focused on identifying neighborhood-level resources that can be mobilized to decrease levels of violence both in families and in communities.  She is also a co-investigator on the ongoing Boston Data Project at the Harvard Youth Violence Prevention Center, where ongoing surveillance of youth violence and its risk and protective factors has been done since 2004. This work has led to active collaborations with the Boston Public Health Commission, the Boston Public Schools, and the Boston Police Department, among others, to develop coordinated responses to traumatized youth. Prior to joining Northeastern, Dr. Molnar was an Associate Professor of Society, Human Development and Health at the Harvard School of Public Health.  She maintains a Visiting Scientist appointment with the Harvard Youth Violence Prevention Center.

Education/degrees: 
Doctor of Science (ScD) & Masters of Science (SM), Harvard School of Public Health
Bachelor’s of Science (BS), University of California, Los Angeles

Specializations: 
Child abuse and neglect, community-level prevention, Social and psychiatric epidemiology

Research Interests: 
Etiology and sequelae of child maltreatment; community-level prevention of child maltreatment; multi-level prevention of youth violence; effects of exposure to complex trauma; prevention of sexual violence

Selected Research Projects:

  • Project LAUNCH – Evaluation of the SAMHSA-funded Boston site of Project LAUNCH (Linking Actions for Unmet Needs in Children’s Health) an effort to integrate behavioral health services for young children (birth to 8) from high risk families into community-based pediatric medical homes. The initiative is being conducted by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health and the Boston Public Health Commission, in conjunction with providers at two community health centers and one hospital-based pediatric primary care clinic.
  • Boston Data Project, Harvard Youth Violence Prevention Center – Biannual surveys of high school-aged youth in Boston Public Schools, as well as adults in Boston neighborhoods, have been conducted since 2004.  The goal is to provide surveillance data on youth violence and its associated risk and protective factors for both research purposes as well as to share with the Boston Public Health Commission, the Boston Police Department, and community-based organizations for planning and policy purposes.

Public Service (Current):

  • Officer and Member of Board of Directors, Boston Area Rape Crisis Center,
  • Member of the Editorial Board for the journal Child Maltreatment, American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children (APSAC)
  • Ad-hoc Reviewer, National Institutes for Health, Psychosocial Development, Risk and Prevention (PDRP) study section
  • Member of Collaborative, Defending Childhood Initiative, Boston Public Health Commission
  • Member, Working Group on Child Maltreatment Data Collection (WGCMDC), International Society for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect (ISPCAN)

Affiliations:

  • Harvard Youth Violence Prevention Center, Harvard School of Public Health / Visiting Scientist
  • Boston Area Rape Crisis Center / Member of Board of Directors

Courses:

  • PHTH 2350 – Community and Public Health
  • PHTH 5540 – Health Education and Program Planning

Publications:
Peer-reviewed Publications
*Denotes Senior Author

Molnar BE. Juveniles and psychiatric institutionalization: Toward a better system of due process and treatment review in the U.S.  Health and Human Rights 1997; Vol. 2(2): 99-116.

Kral AH, Molnar BE, Booth RE, Watters JK.  Prevalence of sexual risk behavior among runaway and homeless adolescents in San Francisco, Denver and New York City. International Journal of STD & AIDS 1997; Vol. 8: 109-117.

Molnar BE, Shade SB, Kral AH, Booth RE, Watters JK.  Suicidal behavior and sexual/physical abuse among street youth. Child Abuse & Neglect 1998; Vol. 22(3): 213-222.

Merikangas KR, Mehta RL, Molnar BE, Walters EE, Swendsen JD, Auilar-Gaziola S, Bijl R, Borges G, Caraveo-Anduaga JJ, DeWit DJ, Kolody B, Vega WA, Wittchen HU, Kessler RC.  Comorbidity of substance use disorders with mood and anxiety disorders: Results of the International Consortium in Psychiatric Epidemiology (ICPE). Addictive Behaviors 1998; Vol. 23(6): 893-907.

Wechsler H, Molnar BE, Davenport AE, Baer JS.  College alcohol use: A full or empty glass?  The Journal of American College Health 1999; Vol. 47 (6): 247-252.

Kessler RC, Aguilar-Gaxiola S, Andrade L, Bijl R, Borges G, Caraveo-Anduaga JJ, DeWit DJ, Kolody B, Merikangas KR, Molnar BE, Vega WA, Walters EE, Wittchen HU, Ustun TB. Mental-substance comorbidities in the ICPE surveys.  Psychiatria Fennica 2001; Vol. 32 (suppl 2): 62-79.

Kessler RC, Molnar BE, Feurer ID, Appelbaum M. Patterns and mental health predictors of domestic violence in the United States: Results from the National Comorbidity Survey.  International Journal of Law and Psychiatry 2001; Vol. 24 (4-5): 487-508.

Molnar BE, Berkman LF, Buka SL. Psychopathology, child sexual abuse, and other childhood adversities: Relative links to subsequent suicidal behavior in the U.S. Psychological Medicine 2001; Vol. 31: 965-977.

Molnar BE, Buka SL, Kessler RC.  Child sexual abuse and subsequent psychopathology: Results from the National Comorbidity Survey. American Journal of Public Health 2001; Vol. 91(5): 753-760.

Vega WA, Aguilar-Gaxiola S, Andrade L, Bijl R, Borges G, Caraveo-Anduaga JJ, DeWit DJ, Heeringa SG, Kessler RC, Kolody B, Merikangas KR, Molnar BE, Walters EE, Warner LA, Wittchen HU. Prevalence and age of onset for drug use in seven international sites: results from the international consortium of psychiatric epidemiology. Drug & Alcohol Dependence 2002; Vol. 68:  285-297.

Molnar BE, Buka SL, Brennan RT, Holton JK, Earls F. A multi-level study of parent-to-child physical aggression: results from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods. Child Maltreatment 2003; Vol. 8(2): 84-97.

Molnar BE, Gortmaker SL, Bull FC, Buka SL.  Unsafe to play?  Neighborhood disorder and lack of safety predict reduced physical activity among urban children and adolescents.   American Journal of Health Promotion 2004; Vol. 18(5): 378-386.

Molnar BE, Miller MJ, Azrael D, Buka SL. Neighborhood predictors of concealed firearm carrying among children and adolescents: Results from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods.  Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine 2004; Vol. 158: 657-664.

Molnar BE, Roberts A, Browne A, Gardener H, Buka SL.  What girls need: Recommendations for preventing violence among urban girls in the U.S.  Social Science & Medicine 2005; Vol. 60(10): 2191-2204.

Molnar BE, Browne A, Cerda M, Buka SL.  Violent behavior by girls reporting violent victimization: A prospective study.  Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine 2005; Vol. 159: 731-739.

Brennan RT, Molnar BE, Earls F.   Refining the measurement of exposure to violence (ETV) in urban youth.  Journal of Community Psychology 2007; Vol. 35(5): 603-618.

Borges G, Benjet C, Medina-Mora ME, Orozco R, Molnar BE, Nock MK. Negative life events and suicide-related outcomes among Mexico City adolescents.  Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 2008; 49(6): 654-666.

Austin SB, Roberts AL, Corliss, H, Molnar BE.* Sexual violence victimization history and sexual risk indicators in a community-based urban cohort of “mostly heterosexual” and heterosexual young women. American Journal of Public Health 2008; Vol. 98(6):  1015-1020.

Almeida J, Cohen AP, Subramanian SV, Molnar BE.* Increased worker caseloads in state child protective service agencies as a potential explanation for the decline in child sexual abuse: A multilevel analysis.  Child Abuse & Neglect 2008; Vol. 32(3): 367-375.

Molnar BE, Cerda M, Roberts AL, Buka SL.  Neighborhood resources: Effects on aggressive and delinquent behaviors among urban youth.  American Journal of Public Health 2008; Vol. 98(6): 1086-1093.

Reed E, Silverman JG, Raj A, Rothman EF, Decker MR, Gottlieb BR, Molnar BE, & Miller E. Social and environmental contexts of adolescent and young adult male perpetrators of intimate partner violence: A qualitative study. American Journal of Men’s Health 2008; Vol. 2(3): 260-271.

Almeida J, Kawachi I, Subramanian SV, Molnar BE.* Ethnicity and nativity status as determinants of perceived social support: Testing the concept of familism.  Social Science & Medicine 2009; Vol. 68(10): 1852-8.

Miller MJ, Barber C, Azrael D, Hemenway D, Molnar BE.* Recent psychopathology, suicidal thoughts and suicide attempts in households with vs. without firearms: findings from the National Comorbidity Study Replication. Injury Prevention 2009; Vol. 15(3):  183-7.

Almeida J, Johnson RM, Corliss HL, Molnar BE, Azrael D. Emotional distress Among LGBT youth: The influence of perceived discrimination based on sexual orientation. Journal of Youth and Adolescence 2009; Vol. 38(7): 1001-1014.

LeWinn KZ, Stroud LR, Molnar BE, Ware JH, Koenen KC, Buka SL. Elevated maternal cortisol levels during pregnancy are associated with reduced childhood IQ. International Journal of Epidemiology 2009; Vol. 38(6): 1700-1710.

Almeida J, Kawachi I, Molnar BE, Subramanian SV. A multilevel analysis of social ties and social cohesion among Latino immigrants and their neighborhoods: Results from Chicago.  Journal of Urban Health 2009; Vol. 86(5): 745-759.

Reed E, Raj A, Falbo G, Caminha F, Decker MR, Kaliel DC, Missmer SA, Molnar BE, Silverman JG.  The prevalence of violence and relation to depression and illicit drug use among incarcerated women in Recife, Brazil.  International Journal of Law and Psychiatry 2009; Vol. 32(5): 323-328.

Duncan DT, Johnson RM, Molnar BE, Azrael D. Association between neighborhood safety and overweight status among urban adolescents.  BioMed Central Public Health 2009; Vol. 9, Article 289.

Azrael D, Johnson RM, Molnar BE, Vriniotis M, Dunn E, Duncan DT, Hemenway D.  Creating a youth violence data system for Boston, Massachusetts.  Australia and New Zealand Journal of Criminology 2009; Vol. 42(3): 406-421.

Corliss HL, Austin SB, Roberts AL, Molnar BE.* Sexual risk in “mostly heterosexual” young women: Influence of social support and caregiver mental health.  Journal of Women’s Health 2009; Vol. 18(12): 2005-1010.

Jain S, Buka SL, Subramanian SV, Molnar BE.* Neighborhood predictors of dating violence victimization and perpetration in young adulthood:  A multi-level study.  American Journal of Public Health 2010; Vol. 100(9): 1737-1744.

Almeida J, Subramanian SV, Kawachi I, Molnar BE.* Is blood thicker than water? Social support, depression and the modifying role of ethnicity/nativity status. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health 2011; Vol. 65: 51-56.

Borges G, Azrael D, Almeida J, Johnson RM, Molnar BE, Hemenway D, Miller MJ. Immigration, suicide ideation and deliberate self-injury in the Boston Youth Survey.  Suicide and Life Threatening Behavior 2011; Vol. 41(2): 193-202.

Green JG, Dunn EC, Johnson RM, Molnar BE.* A multilevel investigation of the association between school context and adolescent non-physical bullying.  Journal of School Violence 2011; Vol. 10(2):  133-149.

Rothman E, Johnson RM, Young R, Weinberg J, Azrael D, Molnar BE.* Neighborhood factors predict physical teen dating violence perpetration:  Results from a representative survey of Boston public high school-attending youth.  Journal of Urban Health 2011; Vol. 88(2): 201-213.

Dunn EC, Gilman SE, Willett JB, Slopen NB, Molnar BE.*  The impact of exposure to interpersonal violence on gender differences in adolescent-onset major depression:  Results from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication (NCS-R).  Depression and Anxiety 2012; Vol. 29(5): 392-399.

Hepburn L, Azrael D, Molnar BE, Miller M.  Bullying and suicidal behaviors among urban high school youth.  Journal of Adolescent Health 2012; Vol. 51: 93-95.

Jain S, Buka SL, Subramanian SV, Molnar BE.* Protective factors for youth exposed to violence: Role of developmental assets for building emotional resilience. Journal of Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice (in press).

Books and Monographs

Molnar BE.  Child abuse, neglect and health (2004).  Encyclopedia of Health and Behavior, Editor: Anderson N.  Sage Publications Inc: Thousand Oaks, CA.  Pgs. 167-170.

Kessler RC, Aguilar-Gaxiola S, Andrade L, Bijl R, Borges G, Caraveo-Anduaga JJ, DeWit DJ, Kolody B, Merikangas KR, Molnar BE, Vega WA, Walters EE, Wittchen HU.  Cross-national comparisons of comorbidities between substance use disorders and mental disorders: Results from the International Consortium in Psychiatric Epidemiology (2003). Handbook for Drug Abuse Prevention, Theory, Science, and Practice.  Bukoski WJ and Sloboda Z (eds.), Plenum Publishing Corporation: New York. Pgs. 447-472.

Molnar BE.  Community-level prevention of child abuse and neglect.  Handbook of Child Maltreatment, Editors: Korbin J, Krugman R.  Springer Scientific. (Forthcoming)

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Beth E. Molnar
Program Director
323 INV
Tel: 617.373.8936
b.molnar@northeastern.edu

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